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Angell, James Burrill (07 January 1829–01 April 1916), educator and diplomat, was born near Scituate, Rhode Island, the son of Andrew Aldrich Angell and Amy Aldrich, farmers and tavernkeepers. He was educated in local schools and at Brown University, where he received an A.B. in 1849 and was significantly influenced by President ...

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Richard T. Greener. Courtesy of the National Afro-American Museum.

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Greener, Richard Theodore (30 January 1844–02 May 1922), African-American educator, lawyer, and diplomat, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of Richard Wesley Greener, a seaman who was wounded during the Mexican War while serving aboard the USS Princeton, and Mary Ann Le Brune. When he was nine, Greener and his parents moved to Boston but soon left for Cambridge, where he could attend “an unproscriptive school.” Greener’s father, as chief steward of the ...

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Messersmith, George Strausser (03 October 1883–29 January 1960), educator and diplomat, was born in Fleetwood, Pennsylvania, the son of Charles Messersmith, an entrepreneur, and Sarah Strausser. George Messersmith was raised in Berks County, Pennsylvania, and was educated at home by his mother until he was eleven years old. He then went to public schools, graduated from high school, and continued on with a two-year course of study at the normal school in Kutztown in 1900. There he received sufficient training to allow him to teach school. According to the Department of State ...

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Reinsch, Paul Samuel (10 June 1869–24 January 1923), educator and diplomat, was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, the son of George J. Reinsch, a clergyman, and Clara Witte. Reinsch was raised in a strict, Lutheran, German-speaking household and obtained a rigorous, gymnasium-style education at Concordia College. He received a B.A. in 1892 and an LL.B in 1894 from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Disenchanted with the practice of law in Gilded Age Milwaukee and lured by the emergence of the University of Wisconsin at Madison as a major graduate institution in the social sciences and history, Reinsch decided on an academic career. Working under ...

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Reischauer, Edwin Oldfather (15 October 1910–01 September 1990), educator and diplomat, was born in Tokyo, Japan, the son of August Karl Reischauer, a missionary of long residence in Japan, and Helen Sidwell. He lived in Japan until his graduation from the American School in Tokyo in 1927. That year, Reischauer entered Oberlin College, where he earned an A.B. degree, and from there went to Harvard University for graduate study. By the time he entered Harvard, in 1931, he knew that he wanted to become an expert in East Asian studies; in order to receive further specialized training, which was not then available in the United States, he went in 1933 to the University of Paris, where he continued his study of Japanese and Chinese. Two years later he returned to Japan to conduct research for his dissertation. The contrast between the more open, cosmopolitan Japan he remembered from the 1920s and the militaristic and chauvinistic Japan he experienced in the 1930s made a deep impression on Reischauer and provided the point of departure for his thinking about modern Japanese history. For the time being, however, he concentrated on his studies, working on a translation of the diary of Ennin, a ninth-century Buddhist monk who traveled and studied in China. While in Japan, Reischauer married Adrienne Danton, an alumna of Oberlin, in 1935. They were to have three children....

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Tenney, Charles Daniel (29 June 1857–14 March 1930), missionary, educator, and diplomat in China, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the son of Rev. Daniel Tenney, a Congregational minister, and Mary Adams Parker. He received his B.A. from Dartmouth College in 1878 and his M.A. in 1879; in 1900 his alma mater awarded him an honorary doctor of laws. Reared in a religious household and educated during a time of growing interest in missions among college students, he decided to enter divinity school after a year of teaching at an academy in New Hampshire. Immediately upon graduation from Oberlin Theological Seminary in Oberlin, Ohio, in 1882, Tenney was assigned by the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions to Shanxi, China. He thereby joined what became known as the “Oberlin Band,” dedicated to educational and evangelistic work in this poverty-stricken province. His wife, Anne Runcie Jerrell of Bridgeton, New Jersey, whom he had married in March of that year, accompanied him. The couple would have five children, two daughters and three sons. While at Taigu, Shanxi, Tenney founded a primary school where Kong Xiangxi, banker and Guomindang official, learned English and became acquainted with Christianity....

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Turner, James Milton (22 August 1839?–01 November 1915), educator and diplomat, was born a slave in St. Louis County, Missouri, the son of John Turner, a free black farrier, and Hannah Turner, the slave of Aaron and Theodosia Young, formerly of Kentucky. Mother and son were freed by Theodosia Young on 12 March 1844. Educated in clandestinely operated schools in St. Louis, in defiance of Missouri law, Turner was sent by his parents to preparatory school at Oberlin College in Ohio during the mid-1850s. He remained there for no more than two years and returned to St. Louis during the late 1850s. He worked as a porter until the outbreak of the Civil War, when he joined the war effort as a body servant to Colonel Madison Miller, a Union officer....

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Yung Wing (17 November 1828–21 April 1912), educator and diplomat, was born near Macao, China, the son of Yung Ming-kun and Lin Lien-tai. He was educated in schools that had been established by western missionaries in Macao and Hong Kong. In 1847 Yung’s teacher ...