1-8 of 8 results  for:

  • teachers by subject x
  • university or college teacher x
Clear all

Article

Bacon, Alice Mabel (06 February 1858–01 May 1918), writer, educator, and lecturer, was born in New Haven, Connecticut, the daughter of Leonard Bacon, a minister, and Catherine Terry. Her father served as the pastor of the Center Church in New Haven for nearly sixty years; he was also a teacher at Yale University and a local civic leader. Bacon was educated at private schools in New Haven and later took the Harvard “examinations for women” in 1880 and 1881....

Image

Hallie Q. Brown. With two nieces, c. 1913. Courtesy of the National Afro-American Museum.

Article

Brown, Hallie Quinn (10 March 1849–16 September 1949), educator, elocutionist, and entertainer, was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, the daughter of Thomas Arthur Brown, a steward and express agent on riverboats, and Frances Jane Scroggins. Both her parents were former slaves. When Hallie was fourteen years old she moved with her parents and five siblings to Chatham, Ontario, where her father earned his living farming, and the children attended the local school. There Brown’s talents as a speaker became evident. Returning to the United States around 1870, the family settled in Wilberforce, Ohio, so that Hallie and her younger brother could attend Wilberforce College, a primarily black African Methodist Episcopal (AME) institution....

Article

de Cleyre, Voltairine (17 November 1866–20 June 1912), teacher and anarchist lecturer and writer, was born in Leslie, Michigan, the daughter of Hector De Claire, a tailor, and Harriet Elizabeth Billings, a seamstress. Despite being raised in poverty, de Cleyre received formal schooling in a Catholic convent until age seventeen. Her experience in the convent influenced her turn to free thought and anarchism. In her speech “The Making of an Anarchist” she noted that “there are white scars on my soul yet” as a result of the convent life ( ...

Article

Engle, Paul (12 Oct. 1908–22 March 1991), poet, literary critic, and educator, was born in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, the son of Thomas Allen, a horse trader, and Evelyn (Reinheimer) Engle. He was educated at local schools, helped his father in the livery stable, and worked as a newsboy selling papers on the streets, a carrier boy, a chauffeur, a gardener, and, for many years, a drugstore clerk. He began writing poetry at Washington High School and was elected class poet. At Coe College in Cedar Rapids, he studied English literature, American history, and languages, and was awarded a B.A. in ...

Article

Kinnersley, Ebenezer (30 November 1711–04 July 1778), scientific lecturer and teacher, was born in Gloucester, England, the son of William Kinnersley and Sarah Turner. The family emigrated to America in 1714, and William Kinnersley became assistant minister to the Pennepeck Baptist Church, Lower Dublin, near Philadelphia. Nothing is known of Ebenezer Kinnersley’s education. He was baptized on 6 September 1735, married Sarah Duffield in 1739, and moved to Philadelphia about that time, working as a shopkeeper and occasionally preaching at the Philadelphia Baptist Church....

Image

Maria Louise Sanford Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-112745).

Article

Sanford, Maria Louise (19 December 1836–21 April 1920), professor and public lecturer, was born in Saybrook, Connecticut, the daughter of Henry E. Sanford, a shoemaker, and Mary Clark. Early indebtedness that her father repaid over many years taught Sanford the importance of responsibility and kept the family close to poverty. Her own account nonetheless, was of a happy and secure childhood in a Congregational household that read the Bible and worked for community betterment. An unusually able student, she completed local schooling at the Meriden Academy and then asked her father to provide, instead of a marriage portion, the money to attend the New Britain Normal School. She graduated with honors in 1855 and began teaching in Gilead, Connecticut....