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Alberty, Harold Bernard (06 October 1890–02 February 1971), professor of curriculum design and development, was born in Lockport, New York, the son of Willard K. Alberty and Carrie L. Post. Alberty attended rural schools in northeastern Ohio and was graduated from Liverpool Township High School in Medina County, Ohio, in 1908. In 1912 Alberty was graduated from Baldwin University (now Baldwin-Wallace College) in Berea, Ohio, where he studied liberal arts and pre-law subjects. He taught eighth grade in the Berea schools during his final year of college in an effort to underwrite his tuition and continued to hold this position until 1913, when he was graduated from Cleveland Law School and was admitted to the Ohio bar. Because no law positions were then available, Alberty continued to teach, an activity that fascinated him, and he rose quickly in the county school administration, serving as assistant principal of Berea High School from 1913 to 1915; superintendent of Berea schools from 1915 to 1917; district superintendent of Cuyahoga County schools from 1917 to 1920; and assistant Cuyahoga County superintendent from 1920 to 1924. He received an A.M. in school administration from Ohio State University in 1923. Throughout this period Alberty planned to return to the practice of law. In 1916 he married Anna Hower; they had one child. Their marriage ended with her death in the latter 1940s....

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Bardin, Shlomo ( December 1898–16 May 1976), Jewish educator, was born Shlomo Bardinstein in Zhitomir, Ukraine, the son of Haim Israel Bardinstein and Menia Weissburd, members of Zhitomir’s Jewish bourgeoisie. After completing his secondary education at the Zhitomir School of Commerce in 1918, he left Russia for Palestine, which was probably when he shortened his name to “Bardin.” From 1920 he worked as an administrative assistant at the Hebrew Secondary School in Haifa before leaving in 1923 for the University of Berlin, where he studied history and economics. Two years later he entered University College in London for a year’s study of English. Bardin returned to Haifa in 1926 and spent two years teaching at the Hebrew Boarding School. He went to New York City in 1928 and was accepted as a graduate student at Columbia University’s Teachers College. At Columbia he studied comparative education with progressive educators who urged him to research the Danish Folk High School to examine its creative use of music to reach disaffected youth. He received his M.A. in 1930. In 1931 Bardin married a sculptor, Ruth Jonas, daughter of a wealthy Brooklyn lawyer; the couple would have two children....

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Barnard, Henry (24 January 1811–05 July 1900), educator and editor, was born in Hartford, Connecticut, the son of Chauncey Barnard, a sea captain and farmer, and Betsey Andrews. Barnard spent his formative years in Connecticut and graduated from Yale in 1830. Immediately after college he taught school in Pennsylvania for a year and loathed it. He then read law and was admitted to the Connecticut bar in 1834; however, he never practiced. During the winter of 1832–1833 he spent three months in Washington, D.C., where he met many of the leading political figures of the day, and then traveled in the South. Still lacking direction, he embarked on a grand tour of Europe in March 1835; the impetus for the trip was his selection as one of the Connecticut delegates to the London international peace congress. While in England he was introduced to a number of the foremost Whig intellectuals, politicians, and reformers; at the time he seemed to be primarily interested in the cause of prison reform. After touring England he spent six months on the Continent before returning home to attend his ailing father....

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Barnes, Mary Downing Sheldon (15 September 1850–27 August 1898), educator, was born in Oswego, New York, the daughter of Edward Austin Sheldon, an educator, and Frances Anna Bradford Stiles. After completing her early education in the public schools of Oswego, she entered the Oswego Normal and Training School, where she finished the classical course in 1868 and the advanced course the following year. While at Oswego, Sheldon was greatly influenced by her father, who as principal of the school had molded the institution into a leading center of Pestalozzian-based education. Following graduation, she taught at the Normal and Training School in Oswego for two years before entering the sophomore class at the University of Michigan in September 1871. One of the first female students to attend the university, Sheldon was originally interested in the natural sciences. Having taken two history courses under Professor C. K. Adams, however, she was invited to teach Greek, Latin, and botany as well as history at the Normal and Training School upon her graduation in 1874. Denied the chance to teach her first love, physics, she “revenge[d] herself by applying scientific methods to history” (Barnes, quoted in Keohane, p. 68)....

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Berkson, Isaac Baer (23 December 1881–10 March 1975), educational philosopher, was born Isadore Berkson in Brooklyn, New York, the son of Henry Berkson, a merchant, and Jennie Berkman. He attended the City College of New York (1908–1912), where he received a B.A. in liberal arts, Greek, and Latin; and Columbia University and Teachers College (1912–1919), where he earned a master of arts in history of philosophy and sociology of education and a Ph.D. in philosophy and education. In 1919 he married Libbie Suchoff; the couple had three children....

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Blum, Virgil Clarence (27 March 1913–05 April 1993), educator, author, activist, and clergyman, was born in Defiance, Iowa, one of twelve children of John Peter and Elizabeth (Rushenberg) Blum, both farmers. His grade school and high school years were spent at St. Peter's school in Defiance. In 1932 he began college at Dowling College, Des Moines, Iowa, and the next year transferred to Creighton University in Omaha, Nebraska. On 31 Aug. 1934 he entered the Society of Jesus at St. Stanislaus Seminary at Florissant, Missouri, where he earned a bachelor's degree in Latin and English in 1938. (A brother, Victor Joseph, also became a Jesuit and became a professor of geophysics and seismology at St. Louis University). Virgil studied philosophy at St. Louis University in St. Louis, Missouri, continuing studies in the summer until he earned a master's degree in history and political science in 1945....

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Brameld, Theodore Burghard Hurt (20 January 1904–18 October 1987), professor of philosophy and philosophy of education, was born in Neillsville, Wisconsin, the son of Theodore E. Brameld, a real estate agent, and Minnie Dangers, a crafts teacher. Brameld was graduated in 1922 from Neillsville High School and attended Ripon College, from which he was graduated in 1926. He then held an administrative position at the college and in 1928 enrolled at the University of Chicago to study philosophy. He received a Ph.D. in 1931, having studied the works of ...

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Bulkley, John Williams (03 November 1802–19 June 1888), teacher, administrator, and educational reformer, was born in Fairfield, Connecticut. The identities of his parents are unknown. Bulkley’s father arranged for his son’s common school education with an eye to mechanical pursuits, but young Bulkley’s inclinations gravitated toward more intellectual endeavors. About 1820 he moved to Clinton, New York, to prepare himself for Hamilton College. Focusing on the study of mathematics and the classics, he hoped to enter Hamilton as a sophomore. His health failed, however, and he was compelled to disrupt his educational ambitions and embark on a recuperative sea voyage. Bulkley never did return to college, but he had the satisfaction in 1853 of receiving an honorary master of arts from his intended alma mater....

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Clapp, Elsie Ripley (16 November 1879–28 July 1965), progressive educator and community school leader, was born in Brooklyn, New York, the daughter of William Clapp and Sarah Ripley. Her well-off family, then living in New York City’s fashionable Washington Square, sent her to Vassar College, 1899–1903. She transferred to Barnard College, Columbia University, where she received the B.A. degree in English in 1908. She also earned the M.A. degree in philosophy from Columbia University in 1909. She enrolled in a philosophy of education course under ...

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Cobb, Lyman (18 September 1800–26 October 1864), educator and author, was born in Lenox, Massachusetts, the son of Elijah William Cobb and Sally Whitney. His early years are shrouded in obscurity, but he most likely obtained an education in local country schools before entering the teaching profession at the age of sixteen. Cobb made his greatest contribution to the field of primary education as the author of numerous school textbooks, the first of which— ...

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Cubberley, Ellwood Patterson (06 June 1868–14 September 1941), educator and historian, was born in Andrews (then called Antioch), Indiana, the son of Edwin Blanchard Cubberley, a pharmacist, and Catherine Biles. His father owned a small drugstore where Cubberley, by the age of twelve, worked long hours. His father assumed that he would eventually take over the family business and prepared him accordingly. He attended public school in Andrews and in 1885 entered nearby Purdue University to study pharmacology. In the summer of 1886 he attended a lecture by ...

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Luther Gulick. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-91615).

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Gulick, Luther Halsey (04 December 1865–13 August 1918), physical educator and sports administrator, was born in Honolulu, Hawaii, the son of Luther Halsey Gulick and Louisa Lewis, missionaries. His father’s supervisory work for Presbyterian missions took Gulick as a child to Spain, Italy, Switzerland, and Japan as well as to Hawaii. In each place he stored up experiences that compensated for uneven schooling. His higher education, too, was irregular. From 1880 to 1885 he studied in a college preparatory program at Oberlin College, interrupted for a year by his parents’ furlough; in 1886 he briefly attended the Sargent Normal School of Physical Training in Cambridge, Massachusetts, before enrolling as a part-time student in New York University’s school of medicine. He paid his way at NYU by engaging in an unlikely array of activities: providing medical services to a YMCA branch, teaching in a Harlem school, serving as physical director of the YMCA in Jackson, Michigan, and organizing the physical education department at the new YMCA training school in Springfield, Massachusetts....

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Inglis, Alexander James (24 November 1879–12 April 1924), professor, educational surveyor, and author, was born in Middletown, Connecticut, the son of William Grey Inglis and Susan Byers. While attending Wesleyan University in Middletown, Inglis earned distinction both as a scholar and athlete by taking all the school’s Latin prizes, attaining membership in Phi Beta Kappa, excelling in track, and playing varsity football and baseball. After receiving an A.B. in 1902, he was awarded a one-year Wesleyan fellowship that allowed him to study at the American School of Classical Studies in Rome. This overseas study afforded opportunity for broadening his educational views and later influenced his educational opinions and philosophy....

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Lord, Asa Dearborn (17 June 1816–07 March 1875), teacher, education reformer, and editor, was born in Madrid, New York, the son of Asa Lord, occupation unknown, and Lucretia Dearborn, a teacher. Unlike many men of his era, Lord received formal education in several areas. His early education was provided by his mother. He then attended the local district school and an academy, probably the St. Lawrence Academy in Potsdam, New York. In 1837, while teaching in Willoughby, Ohio, Lord returned to his studies at Western Reserve College in Hudson, Ohio. In 1838 he entered Oberlin as a sophomore and stayed for one year. Lord resumed his teaching duties at Willoughby, remaining in that position until 1839. He later studied medicine there, receiving a medical diploma in 1846. He also studied theology privately and was licensed to preach by the Presbytery of Franklin, Ohio. He married Elizabeth W. Russell in 1842; they had no children. She served as an assistant dean at Oberlin and worked with her husband in his many positions....

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McAndrew, William (20 August 1863–28 June 1937), educator and editor, was born in Ypsilanti, Michigan, the son of William McAndrew, a furniture manufacturer, and Helen Walker, an obstetrician and the first female physician in the state of Michigan. His parents, both Scottish immigrants, were active in local reform causes, supporting forums where they hosted such activists as ...

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Mitchell, Lucy Sprague (02 July 1878–15 October 1967), educator, was born in Chicago, Illinois, the daughter of Otho Sprague and Lucia Atwood. Migrating from Vermont to Chicago with his young bride shortly after the Civil War, Otho Sprague and an older brother had opened a dry goods business that soon became the largest wholesale grocery in the world. Members of Chicago’s merchant elite, the Sprague brothers helped established many of Chicago’s leading cultural institutions; they were among the benefactors of Hull-House, the settlement led by ...

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Parkhurst, Helen (07 March 1887–01 June 1973), educator and founder of the Dalton School, was born in Durand, Wisconsin, the daughter of James Henry Parkhurst, an innkeeper and civic leader, and Ida Smallet Underwood, a teacher. Educated in primary and secondary schools in Durand, Parkhurst received her B.S. degree from the River Falls Normal School at Wisconsin State College, graduating in 1907 with the highest professional honors awarded up to that time. She had begun her teaching career three years before in a rural one-room school house in Pepin County, Wisconsin. It was there, faced with the task of teaching forty farm boys of all ages, that Parkhurst began to formulate the system of education that would develop into the Dalton Laboratory Plan. After graduation, she taught, from 1909 to 1910, at the Edison School in Tacoma, Washington, where she continued to develop the outlines of her progressive educational method....

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Partridge, Alden (12 February 1785–17 January 1854), soldier and educator, was born in Norwich, Vermont, the son of Samuel Alden and Elizabeth Wright, farmers. He attended Dartmouth College between 1802 and 1805 but, instead of graduating, enrolled in the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. Partridge was commissioned first lieutenant, Corps of Engineers, on 30 October 1806 and spent the next twelve years as part of the faculty. He became captain on 23 July 1810, professor of mathematics in April 1813, and five months later was appointed the first professor of engineering. In January 1815 Partridge functioned as acting superintendent. His tenure proved unpopular, however, and marred by acrimonious feuding with staff members. Partridge vigorously contested his ouster as superintendent and refused to obey his replacement, Major ...

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Patri, Angelo (27 November 1876–13 September 1965), progressive educator and writer, was born in Piaginne, Italy, the son of Nicola Petraglia, a farmer, and Carmela Conte. The family name was at some point changed to Patri. In 1881 the family emigrated to New York City, where Patri’s father worked as a construction laborer. Patri learned to read and write Italian from an uncle, but did not begin school until he was ten years old. In the next ten years he completed grade school, high school, and the City College of New York, graduating in 1897....