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Bundy, Elroy Lorraine (1920–1975), professor of classics, was born in Fergus Falls, Minnesota, the son of Arthur C. Bundy, a farmer, and Sybil F. Tarkett, a seamstress. His family soon after moved to Duluth, where Bundy’s father found intermittent employment as a security guard and county sheriff while also serving as a lay minister of the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. Bundy always attributed his intellect to his father, his artistic skills to his mother. In 1942 military service took him to California, where he returned four years later to enroll at the University of California at Berkeley. There he soon changed his major from English, which he had chosen as the best preparation for a career as a poet, to classics, finding the ancient poets particularly challenging and stimulating. He received his B.A. in 1948 and then spent a year at Princeton on a Woodrow Wilson Fellowship. He taught briefly at the University of Washington (1952–1953) before being appointed to the Department of Classics at Berkeley in 1953. He received his Ph.D. in classics there in 1954 and remained on the faculty until his death....

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Carter, Jesse Benedict (16 June 1872–20 July 1917), educator and classical scholar, was born in New York City, the son of Peter Carter, a publisher, and Mary Louise Benedict. He entered New York University in 1889 but after a year transferred to Princeton, where his studies gravitated toward literature and the arts but especially classical studies. He graduated at the top of his class in 1893. He then went to Germany, where the best training for a career as a classicist was to be found, and studied for a year at Leipzig (1893–1894) and a year at Berlin and Göttingen (1894–1895). He then returned to Princeton, where he was an instructor in Latin for two years (1895–1897), and then returned to Germany for a year to take his Ph.D. at Halle in 1898. At Halle he was a pupil of the great German student of Roman religion, Georg Wissowa, whose influence permeated his work for the rest of his life. His dissertation ...

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Goodwin, William Watson (09 May 1831–15 June 1912), Eliot professor of Greek at Harvard, was born in Concord, Massachusetts, the son of Hersey Bradford Goodwin, a Unitarian minister, and Lucretia Ann Watson, both of old and prominent families. His parents died when he was an infant, and he was raised in Plymouth by his grandmother, Lucretia Burr Sturges Watson. He credited his uncle, Benjamin Marston Watson, with teaching him Greek. He graduated from Harvard in 1851, received his Ph.D. from Göttingen in 1855 (where three of the first five Eliot professors of Greek studied), returned to become tutor in Greek and Latin (1856–1857), tutor in Greek (1857–1860), Eliot professor until his retirement, and emeritus (1901–1912)....

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Hadas, Moses (25 June 1900–17 August 1966), scholar and educator, was born in Atlanta, Georgia, the son of David Hadas and Gertrude Draizen, Russian-Jewish immigrants. His father was a shopkeeper, a scholar, and a writer in Hebrew and Latin on the rabbinical exegesis of the Pentateuch. After studying Greek and Latin at Boys High School in Atlanta, Hadas earned his B.A. at Emory University in 1922 and his M.A. in classics at Columbia University in 1925. For scholarly, not theological, reasons, he began study in 1922 at the Jewish Theological Seminary in New York and received a rabbinical degree in 1926. He taught for two years at the University of Cincinnati (1926–1928), after which he returned to Columbia and earned his Ph.D. in 1930. His dissertation, ...

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Hamilton, Edith (12 August 1867–31 May 1963), author, educator, and classicist, was born in Dresden, Germany, the daughter of Montgomery Hamilton and Gertrude Pond. Her father’s wealthy and cultured family, prominent citizens of Fort Wayne, Indiana, had sent him to study in Europe in 1863 after he left Princeton University and served briefly in the Union army. There Montgomery Hamilton met and married Gertrude Pond, daughter of a New York sugar importer and Confederate sympathizer who had relocated his family abroad during the Civil War....

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Johnson, Allan Chester (11 August 1881–02 March 1955), university teacher, was born in Loch Broom, Nova Scotia, Canada, the son of Leander Johnson and Hannah Creelman. His parents’ occupations are unknown. Johnson took his A.B. in classics at Dalhousie University in Halifax in 1904, and his Ph.D. at the Johns Hopkins University in 1909, under the supervision of ...

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Rand, Edward Kennard (20 December 1871–28 October 1945), educator and scholar, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the son of Edward Augustus Rand, a Congregational minister who turned Episcopalian in 1880, and Mary Frances Abbot. After graduating with an A.B. summa cum laude from Harvard University in 1894, he was drawn toward two different fields of professional activity, the clergy and college teaching. He divided the next four years between studying at the Harvard Divinity School and at the Episcopal Theological School in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and serving as instructor in Latin at the University of Chicago. He opted in the end for an academic career but never departed from the patterns of thinking that had drawn him toward the church. Rand’s lifelong concern was with the relationship between classical Greek and Roman culture and Christianity as it took shape during the Middle Ages, and to his Harvard classmates on the occasion of their fiftieth reunion he described himself as a “student of Christian humanism” and a “teacher at Harvard.” He pursued advanced study in the classics at the University of Munich, by which he was granted a Ph.D. in 1900. At a time when scientific attention to the subject was very new, he developed an interest in Latin paleography under the particular influence of Ludwig Traube. In 1901 he married Belle Brent Palmer of Louisville, Kentucky, whom he is said first to have courted on the hillsides around Munich by reading her the poetry of ...

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Short, Charles (28 May 1821–24 December 1886), classical scholar and professor, was born in Haverhill, Massachusetts, the son of Charles Short and Rebecca George (information on the occupation of Short’s parents has not been found). He pursued classical studies at Harvard College, which he entered after two years of teaching. He graduated in 1846 and did postgraduate work under ...