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Allen, Young John William (03 January 1836–30 May 1907), missionary, educator, and journalist in China, was born in Burke County, Georgia, the son of Andrew Young John Allen and Jane Wooten. Because of the early death of both parents, Allen was raised by an aunt and uncle, Wiley and Nancy (Wooten) Hutchins, who lived in Meriwether County, Georgia. He received a sizable inheritance from his father, which financed his education at several small private schools near his home in Starrsville, Georgia, including the Baptist-run Brownwood Institute in LaGrange, Georgia, and the Morgan H. Looney schools in Palmetto, Georgia. His inheritance also allowed him to collect a personal library, which made him the envy of his classmates as early as 1850, when he was only fourteen years old. He began college work at Emory and Henry College in Virginia in 1853 but transferred to Emory College in Oxford, Georgia, in the spring of 1854. At Emory, Allen acquired the secular learning of the European tradition as well as knowledge of Christianity. His extracurricular activities included membership in a debating society and religious study groups, both of which prepared him for his subsequent careers in China....

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Bleyer, Willard Grosvenor (27 August 1873–31 October 1935), journalism educator, was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, the son of Albert J. Bleyer, a newspaperman, and Elizabeth Groshans. Six of Albert’s brothers also worked for newspapers. While an undergraduate at the University of Wisconsin (1892–1896), Bleyer edited the student newspaper, the ...

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Brucker, Herbert (04 October 1898–05 April 1977), newspaper editor, syndicated columnist, and teacher, was born in Passaic, New Jersey, the son of Carl Brucker, the head of Fritzsche Bros., U.S. division of Schimmel & Cie., a German chemical company, and Adele Balthasar. After graduating from Williams College, Williamstown, Massachusetts, in 1921, Brucker reported for the ...

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Davidson, James Wood (09 March 1829–15 June 1905), journalist and educator, was born in Craven County, South Carolina, the son of Alexander Davidson and Sarah (maiden name unknown). Davidson’s father was a planter in Craven County, later resurveyed and renamed Newberry, South Carolina. James was educated at South Carolina College at Columbia (later the University of South Carolina), and after graduating with distinction in 1852, he taught Greek and ancient languages in Winnsboro until 1859 and in Columbia until the beginning of the Civil War. Davidson was made adjutant of the Thirteenth Regiment of the South Carolina Volunteers under the command of ...

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de Lima, Agnes Abinun (05 August 1887–27 November 1974), progressive journalist, publicist, and educator, was born in Holywood, New Jersey, the daughter of Elias S. Abinun de Lima, a partner in D. A. de Lima and Sons, a banking firm, and Esther Abinun de Lima. Her parents were from Curacao. De Lima was raised in an upper-class home in New York City and Larchmont Manor, New York, and was taught by tutors and music teachers....

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Fall, Bernard B. (19 November 1926–21 February 1967), war correspondent, historian, and educator, was born in Vienna, Austria, the son of Leon Fall, a businessman, and Anna Seligman. After the German seizure of Austria in 1938, Bernard was taken to France. His parents perished during World War II—his father was executed by the Germans for resistance activity, and his mother was deported to Germany, where she disappeared. In November 1942, following the Nazi occupation of southern France, Fall joined the Resistance, fought in the Alps, and was twice wounded. During the Liberation, he enlisted in the French regular army and served for the duration of the war. He was later awarded the Medal of Liberated France for his valor....

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Finley, John Huston (19 October 1863–07 March 1940), educator and journalist, was born in Grand Ridge, Illinois, the son of James Gibson Finley and Lydia McCombs, farmers. After attending Illinois rural public schools and acquiring knowledge of Latin from tutors, Finley enrolled at Knox College in Galesburg, Illinois, in the fall of 1882. Also attending Knox at the time was Martha “Mattie” Boyden, a banker’s daughter from Sheffield, Illinois, John’s future wife. An old-time coed college with a radical antislavery tradition, Knox sought to reconcile learning, moral rectitude, and worldly success. Finley hoped to become a journalist but realized that he needed the further training the new universities were offering. Thus, after graduation from Knox in 1887, he enrolled at the pioneering Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, where he studied social science in the period prior to disciplinary specialization....

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Fry, Varian (15 October 1907–13 September 1967), editor, journalist, and teacher, was born on West 150th Street in Manhattan, the only child of Arthur Fry, a partner in a small Wall Street brokerage firm, and Lillian Mackey Fry, a Hunter College graduate who taught school until her marriage. Two years after their son's birth the couple moved to Ridgewood, New Jersey. At age fourteen, Fry was sent to the prestigious Hotchkiss Prep School in Lakeville, Connecticut, where he remained for two unhappy years. Bright but unruly and rebellious, he tangled with the school authorities and by mutual consent left Hotchkiss in 1924 for the Taft Prep School in Watertown, Connecticut, where he remained for less than six months. Enrolled in 1925 at the Riverdale Country School, he commuted to classes in a new four-door Packard given to him by his father. At one point during that year, the headmaster suspended Fry for "loss of control and unpardonable impertinence," adding however that his "mind is in many respects brilliant" and that he had "clear possibilities of genius." He was accepted by Harvard University in 1926, and his freshman year was spent in a frenzy of intellectual and social activity. Together with a classmate, ...

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Alvin Johnson Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-116973 ).

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Johnson, Alvin Saunders (18 December 1874–07 June 1971), economist, educator, and journalist, was born near Homer, Dakota County, Nebraska, the son of John Johnson and Edel Maria Katrina Bille, farmers. Johnson’s father emigrated from Denmark to the United States in 1849 with the name Jens Jensen Deyrup; the immigration officer gave him the name John Johnson. Johnson’s mother emigrated from Denmark in 1867. By the time she arrived in Nebraska, John had fought in the Civil War and outlived two other wives, who had left him with five children. Johnson’s parents subsequently had three more children....

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Lee, James Melvin (16 May 1878–17 November 1929), journalist and journalism educator, was born in Port Crane, New York, the son of James Newell Lee, a Methodist minister, and Emma White. He graduated from Wyoming Seminary, Kingston, Pennsylvania, in 1896 and received his A.B. from Wesleyan University in 1900....

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Lerner, Max (20 December 1902–05 June 1992), scholar, teacher, and newspaper columnist, was born Maxwell Alan Lerner near Minsk, Russia, the son of Benjamin Lerner, an itinerant scholar, and Bessie Podel. His father emigrated to the United States the next year, and Max followed with his mother and siblings in 1907. After brief jobs in New York and New Jersey, his father moved to New Haven, Connecticut, in 1913 and entered the dairying business....

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McClellan, George Brinton (23 November 1865–30 November 1940), educator, author, and mayor of New York City, was born in Dresden, Saxony, the son of Civil War general George Brinton McClellan and Mary Ellen Marcy. McClellan attended St. John’s Boarding School in Sing Sing, New York. He then entered Princeton University in 1882. Upon graduating with an A.B. in 1886, he spent two years traveling in Europe. Afterward, he reported for New York daily newspapers, including the ...

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Peel, Robert (06 May 1909–08 January 1992), educator, journalist, historian, and religious scholar, was born in London, the son of Arthur James Peel and Anne Susannah Monk. His mother, a Christian Science practitioner for many years, was a decisive influence. He was also close to his sister Doris Peel (1907-1990), a poet whose writing on spiritual themes attracted a devoted following. He never married....

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Ray, Charles Bennett (25 December 1807–15 August 1886), African-American journalist, educator, and minister, was born in Falmouth, Massachusetts, the son of Joseph Aspinwall Ray, a postal worker, and Annis Harrington, a well-read and deeply religious woman. He claimed descent from American Indians, as well as English and Africans. After schooling in Falmouth, Ray went to work for five years on his grandfather’s farm in Rhode Island and then settled on Martha’s Vineyard to learn the bootmaker’s trade....

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White, Frances Emily (07 May 1832–29 December 1903), medical educator and social critic, was born in Andover, New Hampshire, the daughter of Thomas R. White and Mary H. May, farmers. During White’s childhood her family prospered and moved to the neighboring town of Franklin, a newly established mill center on the Merrimack River. White’s father held several town offices and was regarded as an important member of the Congregational church. One of White’s older sisters married Austin Pike, Franklin’s leading attorney and later a U.S. senator. White, who never married, intermittently lived in the Pike household after her parents’ deaths....