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Andrews, George Leonard (31 August 1828–04 April 1899), soldier, engineer, and educator, was born in Bridgewater, Massachusetts, the son of Manasseh Andrews and Harriet Leonard. After attending the state normal school at Bridgewater, he was accepted as a candidate at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. He graduated at the head of the class of 1851 and was appointed second lieutenant of engineers. His first duty after graduation was in his home state, participating in the construction of Fort Warren in Boston Harbor. He then returned to the academy as an assistant professor....

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Rautenstrauch, Walter (07 September 1880–03 January 1951), engineering educator and industrial engineer, was born in Sedalia, Missouri, the son of Julius Rautenstrauch and Anna Nichter. He graduated with a B.S. from the University of Missouri in 1902 and was awarded his M.S. from the University of Maine in 1903. Rautenstrauch also completed a year of advanced study at Cornell University. In 1904 he married Minerva Babb; the couple had two children. From 1904 to 1906 Rautenstrauch was assistant professor at Cornell; in 1906 he moved to the Columbia School of Engineering, where he became a full professor of mechanical engineering in 1907. In 1918 he offered a course in industrial engineering. By 1920 Rautenstrauch’s interest in the field and his administrative influence persuaded President ...

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Sherwood, Thomas Kilgore (25 July 1903–14 January 1976), chemical engineer and educator, was born in Columbus, Ohio, the son of Milton Worthington Sherwood and Sadie D. Tackaberry. His family soon moved to Montreal, Quebec, Canada, where he spent his youth.

After completing his bachelor of science degree at McGill University in 1923, Sherwood began graduate studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), a leading center for chemical engineering education, where he worked with W. H. Adams and ...

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Terman, Frederick Emmons (07 June 1900–19 December 1982), electrical engineer and educator, was born in English, Indiana, the son of Lewis M. Terman, a psychologist, and Anna Minton. He grew up on the campus of Stanford University, where his father, an expert on mental testing, taught psychology. Intellectually precocious, Terman tested at the genius level on the Stanford-Binet intelligence scale that his father had devised, and was one of the subjects in his father’s famous study of gifted children. Terman’s parents, convinced that conventional education only stifled the truly gifted, taught him at home until the age of nine. Terman then excelled in school, skipping grades and graduating at the top of his Stanford class in 1920 with a degree in chemical engineering. Switching to electrical engineering, he earned a master’s degree under ...