1-20 of 23 results  for:

  • teachers by subject x
Clear all

Article

Allen, Alexander Viets Griswold (04 May 1841–01 July 1908), Episcopal priest, theologian, and educator, was born in Otis, Massachusetts, the son of Ethan Allen, a teacher and Episcopal priest, and Lydia Child Burr. His father served churches in Massachusetts and Vermont. Both parents were strongly evangelical in the Episcopal manner of the time, emphasizing biblical authority and teaching more than sacramental theology—a conviction that produced conflict in several of the churches that Allen’s father served. Their piety shaped Allen’s early views, leading him to enroll at Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio, in 1859. Kenyon was an Episcopal institution then of an evangelical stamp. An excellent student, Allen delivered the valedictory address upon graduating in 1862 and immediately entered Bexley Hall, a theological seminary in Gambier....

Article

Bacon, Benjamin Wisner (15 January 1860–01 February 1932), clergyman and theological professor, was born in Litchfield, Connecticut, the son of Susan (née Bacon) and Leonard Woolsey Bacon, a clergyman. Bacon grew up surrounded by the traditions, habits and the learning of a family of distinguished New England clerics. His paternal grandfather, ...

Article

Bowne, Borden Parker (14 January 1847–01 April 1910), philosopher, theologian, and educator, was born in Atlantic Highlands (formerly Leonardville), New Jersey, the son of Joseph Bowne and Margaret Parker. His father, a farmer and justice of the peace, served also as a local Methodist preacher. His father was a staunch abolitionist, and his mother, a descendent of Quaker stock, despised sham and vanity. Traits of both parents ran deep in their son....

Article

Breckinridge, Robert Jefferson (08 March 1800–27 November 1871), theologian and educator, was born at Cabell’s Dale (near Lexington) in Fayette County, Kentucky, the son of John Breckinridge, a lawyer and politician, and Mary Hopkins Cabell. Raised in one of the most prominent families in Kentucky, he attended Jefferson College between 1816 and 1818, spent a few months at Yale College in 1818, and finally graduated from Union College in 1819. After completing his schooling, he returned home to study law. Breckinridge married his cousin Ann Sophonisba Preston in 1823; they had four children. He opened his practice in 1824 and a year later was elected to represent Fayette County in the state legislature; he held that position until 1828....

Article

Carnell, Edward John (28 June 1919–25 April 1967), theologian and educator, was born in Antigo, Langlade County, Wisconsin, the son of Herbert C. Carnell and Fannie Carstens, a fundamentalist minister and his wife who struggled to support their family by serving several Baptist churches in the Upper Midwest. Carnell attended Wheaton College from 1937 to 1941 and received an A.B. in philosophy. Although he sometimes worked thirty-five to forty hours a week in the dining hall as an undergraduate, Carnell was able to excel in philosophy under the tutelage of Professor Gordon Haddon Clark, whose philosophical defense of Christianity made a lasting impact on a generation of evangelical leaders who attended the midwestern fundamentalist liberal arts college during these years. From Wheaton, Carnell went to Westminster Seminary in Philadelphia, an institution that had been founded in opposition to Princeton Seminary in 1929 during the fundamentalist controversy. At Westminster he studied theology with the Dutch Calvinist Cornelius Van Til, whose system of theology stressed the intellectual differences between believers and nonbelievers, and he earned both a Th.B. and a Th.M (1944). Because the U.S. government deferred the draft of seminarians, Carnell did not serve in World War II. In 1944 he married Shirley Rowe, a schoolteacher; they had two children. Carnell went on to complete two doctorates. He first earned a Th.D. at Harvard University (1948), where he wrote a dissertation on the theology of ...

Article

DuBose, William Porcher (11 April 1836–18 August 1918), theologian, was born near Winnsboro, South Carolina, the son of Theodore Marion DuBose and Jane Porcher, planters. DuBose grew up in the aristocracy of the antebellum South. After attending Mount Sion Institute in Winnsboro, he went to the Citadel (the Military College of South Carolina), from which he was graduated as the ranking cadet officer in 1855. DuBose next attended the University of Virginia, where he received an M.A. in 1859. Then he entered the Episcopal diocesan seminary, established a year earlier, in Camden, South Carolina, to prepare for ordination. With the outbreak of the Civil War in the spring of 1861, DuBose left the seminary for service in the Confederate Army. In April 1863 he married Anne Barnwell Peronneau, and in December of that year was ordained to the diaconate of the Episcopal church. During the remainder of the war DuBose served as a military chaplain....

Article

Foster, Frank Hugh (18 June 1851–20 October 1935), theologian and educator, was born in Springfield, Massachusetts, the son of William F. Foster and Mary Flagg Miller. He received a B.A. from Harvard in 1873 and graduated from Andover Theological Seminary in 1877, when he was ordained a Congregationalist minister. In 1881–1882 he was a Parker Fellow at Harvard; the fellowship allowed him to study in Germany, and he earned a Ph.D. from the University of Leipzig in 1882. He was married twice, first to Eliza Grout in 1877, who died in 1912; they had three children. In 1913 he married Margaret Tracy Algoe, who died in 1920; they had no children....

Article

Foster, George Burman (02 April 1857–22 December 1918), theologian and educator, was born in Alderson, West Virginia, the son of Oliver Harrison Foster and Helen Louise Skaggs. Foster entered Shelton College in 1876 and graduated from West Virginia University in 1883. He served as pastor of the Baptist church in Morgantown, West Virginia, from 1883 to 1884. While there he married Mary Lyon in 1884; they had three children, none of whom survived Foster. Also in 1884 Foster enrolled in the ministerial course at Rochester Theological Seminary, graduating in 1887. He then served at the Baptist church in Saratoga Springs, New York, until 1891....

Article

Gerhart, Emanuel Vogel (13 June 1817–06 May 1904), theologian and educator, was born at Freeburg, Pennsylvania, the son of the Reverend Isaac Gerhart and Sarah Vogel. In 1833 he was enrolled in the Classical School of the German Reformed Church at York, Pennsylvania. In 1835, while Gerhart was a student, the school was moved to Mercersburg, Pennsylvania, and became Marshall College. Gerhart graduated from Marshall in 1838 and enrolled in the Theological Seminary of the Reformed Church, also located in Mercersburg. He completed his theological studies in 1841. During his student years in these institutions he was especially influenced by three of his professors: ...

Article

Harris, Samuel (14 June 1814–25 June 1899), theologian and educator, was born in East Machias, Maine, the son of Josiah Harris, a merchant and clerk of the court, and Lucy Talbot. At age fifteen Harris entered Bowdoin College, where he acquired a lifelong love of language and literature under the tutelage of ...

Article

King, Henry Churchill (18 September 1858–27 February 1934), theologian and educator, was born in Hillsdale, Michigan, the son of Henry Jarvis King, a college administrator, and Sarah Lee. He grew up in Hillsdale and attended Hillsdale College for over a year.

In 1877 King transferred to Oberlin College, from which he graduated in June 1879. He then began his theological studies at Oberlin Theological Seminary. While he was a seminary student King became a Latin and mathematics tutor in Oberlin’s preparatory department and served as summer school administrator. He received his bachelor of divinity degree in June 1882 and the following month married Julia Marana Coates in a ceremony performed by ...

Article

Krauth, Charles Porterfield (17 March 1823–02 January 1883), theologian and educator, was born in Martinsburg, Virginia (now W.Va.), the son of Charles Philip Krauth, a Lutheran minister, and Catherine Susan Heiskell. Between his mother’s death before his first birthday and his father’s peripatetic career, Krauth was raised at several sites in his first ten years before being settled in 1833 at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, where his father was president of Pennsylvania College, a Lutheran institution. Krauth matriculated at that college in 1834, graduated in 1839, then attended the affiliated Gettysburg Seminary from 1839 to 1841 to earn his credentials for the Lutheran ministry. He pastored churches in Baltimore, Maryland, from 1841 to 1847; in the upper Shenandoah Valley, principally Winchester, Virginia, from 1847 to 1855; and in Pittsburgh (1855–1859) and Philadelphia (1859–1861), Pennsylvania. Krauth was married twice: in 1844 to Susan Reynolds of Baltimore (she died in 1853) and in 1855 to Virginia Baker of Winchester, Virginia. He had five children, of whom two survived him....

Article

Machen, J. Gresham (28 July 1881–01 January 1937), educator and theologian, was born John Gresham Machen in Baltimore, Maryland, the son of Arthur Webster Machen, a lawyer, and Mary Gresham. Machen grew up in a prominent and affluent family that was part of a circle of southern gentry who had moved to Baltimore after the Civil War. In this setting Machen developed a deep affection for classical literature, rare books, and the heritage of the Old South. The Machen home also fostered a strong allegiance to the faith and practice of southern Presbyterianism even though the piety of Baltimore’s wealthy Presbyterians was a good deal more genteel than the spirituality of previous generations....

Article

Mathews, Shailer (26 May 1863–23 October 1941), theologian and educator, was born in Portland, Maine, the son of Jonathan Bennett Mathews, a merchant, and Sophia Lucinda Shailer. Though his grandfather was a prominent Baptist minister in Portland, young Mathews manifested only lukewarm interest in pursuing a similar career. Still, after graduating from Colby College in 1884, he attended Newton Theological Institution for three years. He graduated in 1887 and was licensed to preach, but he neither sought ordination nor engaged in pastoral activities. Preferring the vocation of teaching, he accepted positions at Colby, first as professor of rhetoric and then of history and political economy. Between 1890 and 1891, in the middle of his seven-year stint at Colby, Mathews pursued graduate studies in history at the University of Berlin. During that time he also married Mary Philbrick Elden; they had three children....

Article

Niebuhr, H. Richard (03 September 1894–05 July 1962), theologian and educator, was born Helmut Richard Niebuhr in Wright City, Missouri, the son of Gustav Niebuhr, a German immigrant and clergyman in the German Evangelical Synod of North America, and Lydia Hosto. He was the brother of ...

Image

Joseph Priestley. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-104753).

Article

Priestley, Joseph (13 March 1733–06 February 1804), theologian, scientist, and educator, was born in the parish of Birstal, West Riding, Yorkshire, England, the son of Jonas Priestley, a cloth-dresser, and Mary Swift. After his mother’s death in childbirth in 1739, Priestley was adopted in 1742 by his father’s eldest sister, Sarah Keighley. Early inclined to books, he mastered Latin and the elements of Greek, probably in Batley grammar school, and studied Hebrew with John Kirkby, a Congregationalist minister. Priestley acquiesced to Keighley’s wish that he prepare for the Presbyterian ministry, but poor health stood in the way of his education. An uncle offered him a mercantile career in Lisbon, which led Priestley to teach himself French, German, and Italian, and to take instruction in mathematics. In 1751 he returned to the original plan, enrolling in the new dissenters’ academy just opened in Daventry by Caleb Ashworth, who imposed no religious tests on the students. At Daventry, Priestley embraced the Arian view that Jesus was the highest of created beings rather than of the same substance as God and maintained a qualified belief in the doctrine of the Atonement, which he abandoned later as supported neither by scripture nor by reason. Priestley became assistant minister to a congregation in Needham Market, Suffolk, in 1755. When in a course of lectures it became clear that he was no Trinitarian, the congregation fell away. Priestley fared better in 1758, becoming minister at Nantwich in Cheshire to an Independent congregation that included many Scottish commercial travelers....

Image

Barton W. Stone. Clockwise from far right: Stone, Alexander Campbell, Walter Scott, and Thomas Campbell. Engraving by John Chester Buttre, from Pioneers in the Great Religious Reformation of the Nineteenth Century, 1885. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (Card no. 98508288).

Article

Stone, Barton Warren (24 December 1772–09 November 1844), evangelist, educator, and speculative theologian, was born near Port Tobacco, Maryland, the son of John Stone and Mary Warren, farmers. Reared in Pittsylvania County, Virginia, he moved in 1790 to North Carolina to study law at Guilford Academy. His career plans changed when he was converted to an aggressive form of evangelical Protestantism under the influence of ...

Article

Taylor, Nathaniel William (23 June 1786–10 March 1858), theologian and educator, was born in New Milford Connecticut, the son of Nathaniel Taylor and Anne Northrop, farmers and tradespeople. His grandfather, Nathaniel Taylor, was the minister of the New Milford church, and because he “was not after the strictest sort of Calvinism,” he insulated New Milford from the theological influence of ...