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Dubbs, Joseph Henry (05 October 1838–01 April 1910), clergyman, educator, and historian, was born of Swiss-American parentage in rural North Whitehall Township, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania, the son of Joseph S. Dubbs, a German Reformed pastor, and Eleanor Lerch. In his mid-teenage years he enrolled at Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, graduating in 1856. In 1859 Dubbs completed his ministerial training at the Theological Seminary of the Reformed Church at Mercersburg, which was then guided by the scholar and churchman ...

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Good, James Isaac (31 December 1850–22 January 1924), clergyman and educator, was born in York, Pennsylvania, the son of William A. Good, a clergyman, and Susan B. Eckert. Early in his life Good evidenced potential for intellectual vigor and literary expression. When he graduated with honors from Lafayette College in 1872, his work on Alexander Pope was published as the college’s Fowler Prize Essay of that year. After graduating in 1875 from Union Theological Seminary in New York City, he was ordained as a minister in the German Reformed church. He served three pastorates in Pennsylvania during the next three decades: the Heidelberg Reformed Church in York (1875–1877), the Heidelberg Reformed Church in Philadelphia (1877–1890), and the Calvary Reformed Church in Reading (1890–1905). While serving at Reading, Good also entered upon the second, and ultimately more significant, part of his career. In 1890 he began teaching in the theology department of Ursinus College in Collegeville, Pennsylvania....

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Gros, John Daniel (1737–25 May 1812), clergyman, college professor, and philosopher, was born in the Bavarian Palatinate at Webenheim, near the city of Zweibrücken, Germany, the son of Lorenz Gros and Anna Magdalena. Little is known of Gros’s upbringing and early education. His name is sometimes spelled Gross. Gros entered the University of Marburg in 1758 and then matriculated at the University of Heidelberg in 1761, partaking in theological studies. Having intentions of entering the pastoral ministry of the German Reformed church, Gros journeyed to America, landing in Philadelphia in 1764. As the North American population continued to increase, a growing need for pastors existed. Gros’s esteemed German education and some influential connections led the German Reformed Coetus of Pennsylvania to ordain him in 1765. The coetus enacted the ordination without first receiving ratification from the Dutch Church Synod in Holland, which was the mandated procedure at that time. This was a precedent-setting act, as the German Reformed denomination in America began to break free from the church authorities in Europe....