1-8 of 8 results  for:

  • teachers by subject x
Clear all

Article

Barbour, Clarence Augustus (21 April 1867–16 January 1937), clergyman and educator, was born in Hartford, Connecticut, the son of Heman Humphrey Barbour, a probate judge, and Myra Barker. Barbour received his A.B. from Brown University in 1888. At Brown he was elected to Phi Beta Kappa, chosen Senior Class Day orator, and received many other honors. He also taught in the evening public school program of Providence and, during his senior year, served as principal of the Richmond Street Evening School, supervising sixteen teachers who taught 400 pupils. In 1891 he completed his B.D. at Rochester Theological Seminary, was ordained to the Baptist ministry, and accepted a call as the pastor of the Lake Avenue Baptist Church in Rochester, New York. His decision to enter this field was perhaps influenced by his father’s efforts to improve the welfare of convicts and reform drunkards. The same year he married Florence Isabelle Newell; they had four children....

Article

Broadus, John Albert (24 January 1827–16 March 1895), Baptist clergyman and professor, was born in Culpeper County, Virginia, the son of Edmund Broadus, a state legislator, and Nancy Sims. Broadus stood in a long line of preachers, politicians, and revolutionary heroes, which included his father, who served for twenty years in the state legislature of Virginia. After a brief period of teaching, in 1846 he entered the University of Virginia, graduating in 1850 with an M.A. in the humanities and ancient languages (in later years he was offered two different chairs at the university, those in Greek and moral philosophy, which he declined). During college he was converted to Christianity and joined the Baptist denomination. With his vocation as yet undecided, he accepted the pastorate of the Charlottesville Baptist Church but also kept his hand in education by serving as chaplain to the university and teaching classical languages. Thus began his lifelong attempt to synthesize faith and reason, piety and learning. His efforts resulted in the university’s becoming an unofficial educational center for Baptists in Virginia at a time when the denomination sponsored few institutions of higher learning. He served both the church and the university between 1851 and 1859....

Article

Fuller, Thomas Oscar (25 October 1867–21 June 1942), educator, clergyman, and politician, was born in Franklinton, North Carolina, the son of J. Henderson Fuller and Mary Elizabeth (maiden name unknown). Fuller’s father was a former slave who had purchased his freedom and later his wife’s with money earned as a skilled wheelwright and carpenter. While a slave, the elder Fuller taught himself to read, and after the Civil War he became active in Republican politics. During Reconstruction he served as a delegate to the 1868 state Republican convention and as a local magistrate....

Article

Goodspeed, Thomas Wakefield (04 September 1842–16 December 1927), clergyman and educational leader, was born in Glens Falls, New York, the son of Stephen Goodspeed, an unsuccessful small business entrepreneur, and Jane Johnson. An old stock Protestant, Goodspeed was set on a course for the Baptist ministry by his devout mother. He prepared for the ministry first in academies and preparatory schools in Glens Falls and Poughkeepsie, New York, and later in Galesburg, Illinois, after his family moved to the Midwest in 1855. In 1859 he entered the first University of Chicago, thereby beginning his involvement in a distinctive episode in the history of American higher education....

Article

Jewett, Milo Parker (27 April 1808–09 June 1882), educator, clergyman, and first president of Vassar Female College (later Vassar College), educator, clergyman, and first president of Vassar Female College (later Vassar College), was born in St. Johnsbury, Vermont, the son of Calvin Jewett, a physician, and Sally Parker. After graduating with a bachelor of arts degree from Dartmouth College in 1828, Jewett served for a brief period as principal of Holmes Academy in New Hampshire while at the same time reading law. Subsequently he prepared himself for the ministry at Andover Theological Seminary, receiving a divinity degree in 1833. During this period he developed a keen interest in the emerging common school (public school) education movement and gave public lectures to popularize its growth. Jewett was married in 1833 to Jane Augusta Russell, also a New Englander. They were childless....

Article

MacLeish, Martha Hillard (17 August 1856–19 December 1947), religious and educational leader, was born in Hadlyme, Connecticut, the daughter of Elias Brewster Hillard, a Congregational minister, and Julia Whittlesey. After graduating from Vassar College in 1878 she taught school in Connecticut and spent three years at Vassar as a mathematics teacher. In 1884 she became principal of Rockford (Ill.) Seminary, whose founder had recently retired. Rockford, like Mount Holyoke Seminary, which it resembled, was in the process of becoming a genuine college. MacLeish raised academic standards, introduced an honors system, built a gymnasium, and increased social ties with the nearby men’s college, Beloit. She left Rockford in 1888 to become the third wife of Andrew MacLeish, a partner in the Chicago department store Carson, Pirie Scott. The couple had five children, including the poet ...

Article

Peck, John Mason (31 October 1789–14 March 1858), Baptist missionary and educator, was born near Litchfield, Connecticut, the son of Asa Peck and Hannah Farnum, farmers. Hard work on poor farmland left little time for schooling, and Peck struggled to overcome that deficiency through private study. By 1807 he was teaching school in Greene County, New York, where he met Sarah Paine, whom he married in 1809. When the first of their ten children was born, Sarah Peck questioned the traditional Congregationalist practice of baptizing infants. Her husband tried to answer her doubts but found that he too could not justify such a ritual. The couple affiliated with Baptists thereafter, and Peck soon devoted himself to that denomination. Licensed to preach in 1811 and ordained in Catskill, New York, in 1813, he served as minister and schoolteacher in small towns such as Catskill and Amenia, New York. In 1815 he met ...

Article

Wait, Samuel (19 December 1789–28 July 1867), clergyman and educator, was born in White Creek, Washington County, New York, the son of Joseph Wait and Martha Smith, farmers. After his birth the family moved first to Granville, New York, then to Tinmouth, Vermont, and finally to Middletown, Vermont, where in 1809 Samuel joined the Baptist church. Feeling called to preach in 1813, he entered Salem Academy in Washington County, New York, to study Greek and Hebrew and to learn the theological arguments that would allow him “to meet the infidel on his own ground” in written and oral debates. On 16 December 1815 the Baptist congregation in Middletown licensed him to preach, and in 1816 he became pastor of the Baptist church of Sharon, Massachusetts, which ordained him on 3 June 1818....