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Bowden, John (07 January 1751–31 July 1817), Anglican clergyman and educator, was born in Ireland, where his father, Thomas Bowden, Esq., was serving as an officer of the King’s Forty-fourth Regiment of foot soldiers. (Information about his mother is unavailable.) When his father came to America to fight in the French and Indian War, Bowden soon followed. After a period of private preparation, he studied at the College of New Jersey (later Princeton University) for two years, though he did not take a degree. Instead, when his father returned to Ireland after the cessation of hostilities in 1763, he followed him. Bowden returned to America in 1770 and studied divinity at King’s College (now Columbia University), graduating in 1772. Two years later he went to England for ordination as a priest of the Church of England....

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Camm, John (21 June 1718–22 May 1779), Anglican clergyman, professor, and college president, was born in Hornsea, Yorkshire, England, the son of Thomas Camm, and Ann (or Anna) Atkinson. He received a B.A. at Trinity College, Cambridge, and may also have held an M.A. and a D.D. He arrived in the colony of Virginia in 1745 to fill the post of rector of Newport Parish, Isle of Wight County. Within four years, he was appointed to one of two professorships of divinity at the College of William and Mary, first appearing in the faculty minutes on 18 September, 1749. He also became rector of Yorkhampton Parish, whose church stood in Yorktown, some twelve miles distant from Williamsburg, the seat of the college and of the government of the colony....

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Smith, William (07 September 1727–14 May 1803), clergyman and educator, was born in Aberdeen, Scotland, the son of Scottish Episcopal parents Thomas Smith and Elizabeth Duncan. He attended Aberdeen University from 1743 to 1747 but left, without taking a degree, to teach, first in Scotland and then in 1751 as a tutor in the home of Josiah Martin on Long Island, New York. He became involved in the political controversy over the founding of King’s College and thereby became a protégé of the Anglican patriarch in America, the Reverend ...

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Stouppe, Pierre (1690–06 January 1760), Huguenot minister, Anglican priest, missionary, and educator, was born into a Reformed Protestant family in Switzerland. Many details of his early life are unavailable and the remainder are sketchy, but he was almost certainly related to Jean-Baptiste Stouppe, a minister of the French Reformed (Huguenot) Church of London in the 1650s. J.-B. Stouppe's surname was originally Stoppa, and his family came from the Italian-speaking area north of Lake Como. In 1620, as persecuted Protestants, the Stoppas fled from this predominantly Catholic area to Zurich. Both Pierre and Jean-Baptiste were educated for the ministry at the Calvinist Genevan Academy....