1-12 of 12 results  for:

  • politicians in American or USA x
  • state governor x
  • diplomacy and international relations x
Clear all

Article

Bowles, Chester Bliss (05 April 1901–25 May 1986), businessman, politician, and diplomat, was born in Springfield, Massachusetts, the son of Charles Allen Bowles, a paper manufacturer, and Nellie Harris. His grandfather, Samuel Bowles (1826–1878), a man Chester frequently identified as his inspiration and role model, transformed the Springfield ...

Article

Eustis, William (10 June 1753–06 February 1825), politician and diplomat, was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, the son of Benjamin Eustis, a housewright, and Elizabeth Hill. Eustis graduated from Harvard in 1772 and then studied medicine with Joseph Warren of Boston. During the Revolution, he served as surgeon to Gridley’s and Knox’s artillery regiments and as a hospital surgeon. In 1782, while attached to the General Hospital at West Point, Eustis was among the coterie of disgruntled officers who petitioned Congress over the financial plight of the army. General Washington was able to mollify the discontent with his Newburgh Address and prevented the budding rebellion among his officers. From this officer corps at West Point and Newburgh developed the Society of Cincinnati, which Eustis called a “band of friends and brothers.” He served as vice president of the Massachusetts Society of the Cincinnati from 1786 to 1810 and again in 1820....

Article

Forsyth, John (22 October 1780–21 October 1841), politician and diplomat, was born in Fredericksburg, Virginia, the son of Robert Forsyth, a businessman and farmer, and Fanny Johnston Houston. John was reared in Augusta, Georgia, where the Forsyth family had made its home in 1785. In 1799 he graduated from the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University), returned to Augusta, studied law, and in 1802 started his practice. In May he married Clara Meigs, daughter of ...

Image

Christopher Gore. Engraving of a portrait by John Trumbull, 1809. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-111573).

Article

Gore, Christopher (21 September 1758–01 March 1827), Federalist statesman, diplomat, and lawyer, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the son of John Gore, a paint and color dealer, and Frances Pinkney. Paternally, he was descended from a Puritan family that migrated from Hampshire in England to Roxbury, Massachusetts, in 1635. After attending the Boston Public Latin School, Gore entered Harvard College where he graduated in 1776. Although his Loyalist father fled Boston in 1776, Gore remained in Massachusetts and served the revolutionary cause as an officer in an artillery regiment. John Gore returned to America from England in 1785 and regained his citizenship. The taint of his father’s Toryism persisted, however, and Gore’s opponents used it against him when he was a candidate for the Massachusetts ratifying convention in 1787....

Article

Kavanagh, Edward (27 April 1795–21 January 1844), politician and diplomat, was born in Damariscotta Mills, in what was then the District of Maine, part of Massachusetts. His father, James Kavanagh, a pioneering lumberman and prosperous merchant, emigrated from Ireland in 1784; his mother was Sarah Jackson of Boston. Edward grew up in a staunchly Catholic household. His mother was a convert to Catholicism in Boston before he was born. His father was a major donor for the construction costs of the brick St. Patrick’s Church in Newcastle built in 1808, the oldest standing Catholic church in New England. The family played a role similar to other middle-class Catholics in Ireland and Maine, “consolidating the community” and “maintaining cultural continuity” (McCarron, p. 285)....

Article

Low, Frederick Ferdinand (30 June 1828–21 July 1894), businessman, politician, and diplomat, was born in Frankfort (present-day Winterport), Maine, into a Penobscot Valley farming family. His parents’ names are not known. Frederick Low attended public schools and Hampden Academy. At age fifteen he was apprenticed to Russell, Sturgis and Company, a Boston firm with a large China trade. He enriched his education by attending Fanuiel Hall and Lowell Institute lectures. Low completed his apprenticeship in 1849 and joined other Forty-niners in California. For three months he panned gold on the American River. Taking some $1,500 from his claim, he declared himself “satisfied” and returned to San Francisco to commence successful careers in business and government....

Article

McNutt, Paul Vories (19 July 1891–24 March 1955), politician and diplomat, was born in Franklin, Indiana, the son of John Crittenden McNutt, a lawyer and librarian of the Indiana Supreme Court, and Ruth Neely. After a childhood in Martinsville, Indiana, where his father practiced law, McNutt studied at Indiana University. He was an active campus politician who became editor of the school newspaper and president of the student union. He graduated with an A.B. in 1913 and then went on to Harvard Law School, from which he received an LL.B. in 1916. He entered the army during World War I and became a major in the artillery. His duties kept him in the United States. He married Kathleen Timolat in 1918; the couple had one daughter....

Article

Middleton, Henry (28 September 1770–14 June 1846), planter, politician, and diplomat, was born in London, England, the son of Arthur Middleton, signer of the Declaration of Independence, member of the Continental Congress, and governor of South Carolina, and Mary Izard. He was educated in classical studies by private tutors at Middleton Place, the family plantation near Charleston, and in England. While residing in Great Britain, on 13 November 1794 he married Mary Helen Hering, the daughter of Juliness Hering of Heybridge Hall, captain of his Majesty’s Thirty-Fourth Regiment. The couple had twelve children, eight of whom survived infancy. Upon Middleton’s permanent return to the United States in 1800, he inherited Middleton Place, where he planted the first camellias in the United States, and the family estate at Newport, Rhode Island....

Article

Osborn, Thomas Andrew (26 October 1836–04 February 1898), lawyer, politician, and diplomat, was born in Meadville, Pennsylvania, the son of Carpenter Osborn and Elizabeth Morris. Nothing is known about what his parents did for a living. Osborn learned the printing trade in Meadville and attended the preparatory department of Allegheny College from 1855 to 1857. He read for the law in 1856. In 1857 he moved to Pontiac, Michigan, where he was admitted to the bar. He left Pontiac in late 1857 and settled in Lawrence, Kansas, where he worked as a print compositor and occasional acting editor of the ...

Image

Adlai Stevenson Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-107668).

Article

Stevenson, Adlai Ewing, II (05 February 1900–14 July 1965), governor, diplomat, and two-time candidate for president, was born in Los Angeles, California, the son of Lewis Green Stevenson, a businessman, and Helen Louise Davis. He was named after his grandfather, Adlai Ewing Stevenson...