1-9 of 9 results  for:

  • politicians in American or USA x
  • state governor x
  • army officer (American revolution) x
Clear all

Article

Bloomfield, Joseph (18 October 1753–08 October 1823), lawyer, soldier, and politician, was born in Woodbridge, New Jersey, the son of Moses Bloomfield, a physician, and Sarah Ogden. The family was one of the most prominent in colonial New Jersey. His father had received a first-rate medical education in Edinburgh, Scotland, and had a thriving practice in Middlesex County by the time Joseph was born. Joseph’s mother was a member of a wealthy and influential family of Elizabethtown, which further assured Joseph’s upper-class pedigree. His education and choice of occupation were in line with his social standing. While in his early teens, he attended the Reverend Enoch Green’s classical academy in Deerfield, Cumberland County, at the opposite end of the province from Woodbridge. Upon graduation, Bloomfield returned to East Jersey, determined to be a lawyer. He entered the profession at the top, studying in Perth Amboy with Cortlandt Skinner, attorney general of New Jersey, and was admitted to the bar in November 1774. Setting up practice in Bridgeton, Cumberland County, he soon became known and respected in all of New Jersey’s southern counties. The future seemed secure, had not the American Revolution intervened....

Article

Davie, William Richardson (20 June 1756–05 November 1820), statesman and soldier, was born in Egremont, Cumberlandshire, England, the son of Archibald Davie, a manufacturer of damask fabric, and Mary Richardson. In 1763 he was brought by his father to Waxhaw, South Carolina, to be adopted by his mother’s brother, the Reverend William Richardson, a Presbyterian clergyman. He was educated at an academy in Charlotte, North Carolina—Queen’s Museum College. He then studied at Princeton, from which he graduated in 1776 with first honors. He subsequently studied law in Salisbury, North Carolina. Although he was licensed to practice law in 1780, his service in the revolutionary war deferred his becoming a jurist until 1782....

Article

Lewis, Morgan (16 October 1754–07 April 1844), soldier and politician, was born in New York City, the son of Francis Lewis (1713–1802), a merchant, and Elizabeth Annesley. Lewis’s father, a prominent political figure in New York, served in the Second Continental Congress and was a signer of the Declaration of Independence. Young Lewis’s early life showed promise of a brilliant future. He graduated with high honors in 1773 from the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University). Afterward, he studied law in the offices of ...

Article

Martin, Alexander (1740–02 November 1807), revolutionary soldier and political leader, was born in Hunterdon County, New Jersey, the son of Hugh Martin, a Presbyterian minister, and Jane Hunter. Both parents were of Irish descent. Educated at the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University), he received A.B. and A.M. degrees in 1756 and 1759, respectively. After a sojourn in Virginia as a tutor, he settled in Salisbury, Rowan County, North Carolina, about 1760. He acquired property there and in Guilford County (now Rockingham County) along the Dan River. He became a merchant and, by appointment of Governor ...

Article

Ogden, Aaron (03 December 1756–19 April 1839), soldier, public official, and entrepreneur, was born in Elizabethtown, New Jersey, the son of Robert Ogden II, a lawyer, and Phebe Hatfield. He attended the College of New Jersey (later Princeton University) and graduated with the class of 1773. Over the next three years he taught school, first in Princeton, then in Elizabethtown, but with the outbreak of hostilities between Great Britain and its American colonies, he was quickly drawn into the revolutionary confrontation....

Image

Thomas Pinckney. Nineteenth-century print. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-101386).

Article

Pinckney, Thomas (23 October 1750–02 November 1828), soldier and statesman, was born in Charleston, South Carolina, the son of Charles Pinckney and Elizabeth “Eliza” Lucas. Members of South Carolina’s low-country landed aristocracy, his parents prepared him, his older brother, Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, and his sister, Harriott, for expected leadership roles in the colony’s society. Because of limited educational opportunities, the parents moved to England in 1753, enrolling the boys in local academies. Threats of war with France, however, forced the elder Pinckneys to return with Harriott to South Carolina in 1754, leaving their sons in England. Unfortunately, the elder Charles Pinckney died two months after arriving at Charleston....

Article

Smallwood, William (1732–14 February 1792), officeholder and soldier, was born in Charles County, Maryland, probably on his father’s estate, “Smallwood’s Retreat,” on Mattawoman Creek. He was the son of Bayne Smallwood, a prominent planter and delegate to the lower house of the Maryland General Assembly, and Priscilla Heabard (Heaberd). Smallwood was educated in England at Kendall and Eaton, and served in the Seven Years’ War upon his return to Maryland. His political career began in 1761, when he was elected to the lower house of the General Assembly. He represented Charles County in the House of Delegates until 1774, and served on the Arms and Ammunition Committee during most of his years in the assembly. Locally, Smallwood served as a Charles County justice in 1762, and from 1770 to 1773, and was a member of the vestry of Durham Parish Anglican church from 1775 to 1776....

Article

Sullivan, John (17 February 1741–23 January 1795), soldier and politician, was born in Summersworth Parish, Maine, the son of Owen O’Sullivan (who also called himself John Sullivan), a schoolmaster, and Margery Brown. In 1760, after studying law under Samuel Livermore, he married Lydia Remick Worster; they had had six children, four of whom survived infancy. In about 1763 he set up a law practice in Durham, New Hampshire. His aggressiveness, especially in pressing debtors, made many enemies, but his gregariousness and dash attracted a following. He supported Governor ...