1-8 of 8 results  for:

  • politicians in American or USA x
  • state governor x
  • political figure x
  • army officer (US civil war - Confederate) x
Clear all

Article

Churchill, Thomas James (10 March 1824–14 May 1905), soldier and politician, was born near Louisville in Jefferson County, Kentucky, the son of Samuel Churchill and Abby Oldham, farmers. After graduating from St. Mary’s College in Bardstown in 1844, Churchill attended Transylvania University and studied law. He joined the First Kentucky Mounted Riflemen Regiment as a lieutenant at the beginning of the Mexican War. Enemy cavalrymen captured Churchill in January 1847, and he remained a prisoner in the city of Mexico until the war had almost ended. Churchill purchased a plantation near Little Rock, Arkansas, in 1848 and began raising cotton. In 1849 he married Ann Sevier; they had four children. He received an appointment as postmaster at Little Rock in 1857....

Image

Alfred H. Colquitt. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-113057).

Article

Colquitt, Alfred Holt (20 April 1824–26 March 1894), Confederate military officer and politician, was born in Walton County, Georgia, the son of Walter T. Colquitt, an attorney and later a judge, congressman, and U.S. senator, and Nancy Lane. Graduating from Princeton University in 1844, Colquitt studied law and was admitted to the bar in Georgia in 1846....

Image

John B. Gordon. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-B8172-2059).

Article

Gordon, John Brown (06 February 1832–09 January 1904), soldier and politician, was born in Upson County, Georgia, the son of Zachariah Herndon Gordon, a minister, and Malinda Cox. After studies at a private school established by his father, John attended Pleasant Green Academy for a year before entering the University of Georgia in 1850. He did well at Georgia but did not graduate. In 1854 he moved to Atlanta to pursue a legal career. His practice, however, was not as successful as he had hoped, and he decided to explore other fields of employment. After a brief stint as a journalist covering the Georgia General Assembly, he joined his father in a coal-mining venture that quickly prospered. In 1854 he married Fanny Rebecca Haralson, with whom he had six children....

Article

Hagood, Johnson (21 February 1829–04 January 1898), Confederate soldier and politician, was born in Barnwell County, South Carolina, the son of James O’Hear Hagood, a physician and planter, and Indina Allen. After graduating from the Citadel, the military college of South Carolina, in 1847, he read law with a Charleston judge and was admitted to the bar in 1850. Hagood returned to Barnwell County where, like his father, he combined planting with his profession. In 1851 he was appointed deputy adjutant general of the South Carolina militia and elected county commissioner in equity. In 1856 he married Eloise Brevard Butler, daughter of ...

Article

Oates, William Calvin (30 November 1833–09 September 1910), military officer and politician, was born in Pike County, Alabama, the son of William Oates and Sarah Sellers, farmers. His family was impoverished, and Oates attended school intermittently during his childhood. He left home when he was seventeen and fled to Florida, convinced he had killed a man in a brawl....

Article

Price, Sterling (20 September 1809–29 September 1867), politician and soldier, was born in Prince Edward County, Virginia, the son of Pugh Williamson Price, a planter, and Elizabeth Williamson. He attended Hampden-Sidney College for one year, studied law briefly, and in 1830 accompanied his parents to Missouri, where he prospered as a tobacco planter and merchant in Chariton County. In 1833 he married Martha Head, with whom he had six children. From 1836 to 1838 and from 1840 to 1844 he served in the Missouri General Assembly and was Speaker during the latter term. He then was elected as a Democrat to the U.S. House of Representatives. In 1846, following the outbreak of the Mexican War and before he had an opportunity to do anything of note in the House, Price resigned his congressional seat to become colonel of a Missouri regiment assigned to occupation duty in New Mexico. Early in 1847 he suppressed an uprising by the Pueblo Indians and a year later led an expedition into Mexico, which resulted in the capture of the city of Chihuahua and his promotion to the brevet rank of brigadier general. These military achievements made him one of the most prominent and popular men in Missouri and led to his being elected to two terms as governor (1853–1857), after which he returned to planting, engaged in railroad promotion, and in 1860 became state bank commissioner....