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Roger S. Baldwin. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-90730).

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Baldwin, Roger Sherman (04 January 1793–19 February 1863), lawyer, governor, and senator, was born in New Haven, Connecticut, the son of Simeon Baldwin, a lawyer, judge, congressman, and mayor of New Haven, and Rebecca Sherman. Baldwin was a direct descendant of the Puritan settlers of Connecticut and the Founding Fathers of the nation. His father’s family was among the original New Haven colonists, and his mother was the daughter of ...

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Bell, Samuel (09 February 1770–23 December 1850), lawyer, governor, and senator, was born in Londonderry, New Hampshire, the son of John Bell and Mary Ann Gilmore, farmers. His father, a tall, rugged, hot-tempered man, was a commanding figure in his community, who served as a deacon and selectman and as a member of the New Hampshire committee of safety and provincial congress during the Revolution. After working on the farm until he was eighteen, Bell studied at a local school and attended New Ipswich Academy before entering the sophomore class at Dartmouth College in 1791. Following graduation in 1793, he studied law in Amherst, New Hampshire, under ...

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Culberson, Charles Allen (10 June 1855–19 March 1925), lawyer, governor, and U.S. senator, was born in Dadeville, Alabama, the son of David Browning Culberson, a lawyer, and Eugenia Kimbal. His parents moved to Texas when he was young, and he grew up in Jefferson. He attended Virginia Military Institute, from which he graduated in 1874. After studying law with his father, he received a law degree from the University of Virginia in 1877. He married Sallie Harrison in 1882; they had one daughter. While practicing law in Jefferson, Culberson served briefly as county attorney. His father, in the meantime, had become an influential Democratic member of the U.S. House of Representatives. A brother recalled that Culberson “took a drink now and then and played an occasional game of poker or whist” (Madden, p. 7)....

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Charles Samuel Deneen Far left, with some early aviators, 1910. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-89765).

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Deneen, Charles Samuel (04 May 1863–05 February 1940), lawyer, governor of Illinois, and U.S. senator, was born in Edwardsville, Illinois, the son of Samuel H. Deneen, a professor of Latin and ancient history at McKendree College in Lebanon, Illinois, and Mary F. Ashley. Educated in local public schools during his formative years, Charles graduated from McKendree College in 1882. He taught in downstate schools and in Chicago prior to attending the Union College of Law (later Northwestern University School of Law) in Chicago, from which he graduated in 1888. He was admitted to the bar that same year but returned to teaching before entering the practice of law in 1890. In 1891 he married Bina Day Maloney; they had four children....

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Fairfield, John (30 January 1797–24 January 1847), politician and lawyer, was born in Saco, District of Maine, the son of Ichabod Fairfield and Sarah Nason Scamman. Fairfield was educated at local schools and the Limerick Academy. During the War of 1812 he contributed to the war effort by serving on a privateer. Following the war he tried his hand as a merchant (apparently without success), but he eventually pursued a legal career. He married Anna Paine Thornton, the daughter of U.S. Marshal Thomas G. Thornton in 1825; they had nine children. After reading law with Ether Shepley, the U.S. attorney for the District of Maine, Fairfield was admitted to the bar in 1826. He formed a partnership with George Thacher, Jr., and began to gain a reputation as a successful courtroom attorney. In 1832 Fairfield was appointed to serve as the reporter of decisions for the Supreme Court of Maine, a position he held until 1835. From 1835 to 1837 Fairfield authored ...

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Hickenlooper, Bourke B. (21 July 1896–04 September 1971), lawyer and politician, was born in Blockton, Iowa, the son of Nathan C. Hickenlooper and Margaret Blackmore, farmers. On completing high school in 1914, he enrolled at Iowa State College (now Iowa State University), Ames, but following American intervention in the European war, he enlisted in the U.S. Army’s Officer Training Camp at Fort Snelling, Minnesota. Commissioned a second lieutenant, he was assigned to the Third Battalion, 339th Field Artillery, serving in Europe from August 1918 to February 1919. Following his return to Iowa, he resumed his studies at Iowa State, earning a B.S. degree in industrial science in 1920. The next year he enrolled in the College of Law at the State University of Iowa (now the University of Iowa in Iowa City), where he earned a J.D. degree in 1922. He then moved to Cedar Rapids, where he was a member of the firm Johnson, Donnelly and Lynch in 1925. He then proceeded to solo practice until 1937, at which time he joined with M. F. Mitvalsky to form the partnership of Hickenlooper & Mitvalsky, where he continued his practice intermittently even after entering politics. In 1927 Hickenlooper married Verna E. Bensch, with whom he had two children....

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Larrazolo, Octaviano Ambrosio (07 December 1859–07 April 1930), politician, lawyer, and schoolteacher, was born in Allende, Chihuahua, Mexico, the son of Octaviano Larrazolo, a prosperous landowner, and Donaciana Corral. The Larrazolo family lost everything in the 1860s, when the French invasion force under the emperor Ferdinand Maxmilian crushed the Mexican revolt led by Benito Juarez. An old family friend, the Reverend J. B. Salpointe, the Catholic bishop of Arizona, offered in 1870 to ease the family’s financial burdens by taking Larrazolo (who had assisted Salpointe as an altar boy) to the United States. After five years in Tucson, Salpointe, who in the interim had become archbishop of Santa Fe, New Mexico, enrolled Larrazolo in that community’s Christian Brothers’ preparatory program known as St. Michael’s College....

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Palmer, William Adams (12 September 1781–03 December 1860), lawyer and anti-Mason, was born in Hebron, Connecticut, the son of Stephen Palmer and Susannah Sawyer, farmers. Palmer as a boy suffered from an accident to his hand that made it difficult for him to do farm work. After receiving an education in the public schools of Hebron, he decided to pursue a legal career. He went to work in a law office in Hebron, moved in 1800 to Chelsea, Vermont, to continue his legal training, and two years later was admitted to the Vermont bar. Palmer’s practice for the next five years was conducted in Derby and surrounding villages. In 1806 he moved to St. Johnsbury....

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Toucey, Isaac (15 November 1792–30 July 1869), attorney, U.S. senator, and cabinet officer, was born in Newtown, Connecticut, the son of Zalmon Toucey, an attorney and judge, and Phebe Booth. Toucey studied law under Newtown attorney and future judge Asa Chapman before beginning his own practice in 1818 in Hartford. Quickly winning respect in the legal community, he served from 1822 to 1835 and again from 1842 to 1844 as the state’s attorney for Hartford County. Tall and slender with a commanding appearance, Toucey gained a reputation as a courageous, thorough, and hard-working attorney, albeit one who was somewhat cold and formal. In 1827 he married Catherine Nichols; they had no children....