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Anson, Cap (17 April 1852–14 April 1922), professional baseball player and manager, was born Adrian Constantine Anson in Marshalltown, Iowa, the son of Henry Anson, a land developer, town founder, and mayor, and Jeannette Rice. By his young adult years, Anson was tall and well built at 6′ and 227 pounds. He often was referred to as “the Swede” because of his square shoulders and wavy blonde hair, but, in fact, his parents were of English-Irish extraction. Anson was taught to play baseball and invited to join his father and older brother who formed the nucleus of the Marshalltown team, an amateur club of great repute. While in his teens, he attracted attention as an outstanding hitter and all-around athlete. Local residents dubbed him the “Marshalltown Infant.”...

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Bender, Chief (05 May 1884–22 May 1954), baseball player and manager, was born Charles Albert Bender at Partridge Lake, Crow Wing County, Minnesota, the son of Albertus Bliss Bender and Mary Razor, farmers. His father was of German-American descent, and his mother, whose tribal name was Pay shaw de o quay, was a half-white member of the Mississippi band of the Ojibwa (Chippewa). The family moved to Brainerd, Minnesota, on White Earth Indian Reservation during the 1880s, but at age seven Bender was placed in the Educational Home in Philadelphia, an Episcopal school for white and Indian orphan and destitute children. Although he returned to Minnesota in mid-1896, he soon ran away and enrolled at the Indian School in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, where he played baseball and football under the legendary coach Glenn Warner. After leaving Carlisle in February 1902, he pitched for nearby Dickinson College. That summer he played for the Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, Athletic Club, using the surname Albert to protect his college eligibility. There, he pitched a 3–1 win over the Chicago Cubs. Jess Frisinger, a scout for ...

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Bresnahan, Roger Philip (11 June 1879–04 December 1944), baseball player, coach, and manager, was born in Toledo, Ohio, the son of Michael Bresnahan and Mary O’Donahue, immigrants from Tralee, County Kerry, Ireland. As a youth, Bresnahan played baseball on amateur teams in Toledo, and at age sixteen he earned money playing on a club in Manistee, Michigan. In 1896, while with Lima in the Ohio State League, he impressed scouts with his strong arm, quickness of foot, and all-around ability. The next year he made his major league debut as a pitcher for the Washington Senators of the National League and hurled a shutout in his first game (28 Aug. 1897), finishing the season with a 4–0 mark. The following spring he got into a salary dispute with the Senators and refused to sign. As a result, he played in only a handful of minor league games in 1898 and 1899, and in 1900 he appeared in just one major league contest, as a member of the Chicago club in the National League....

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Chance, Frank Leroy (09 September 1877–15 September 1924), baseball player and manager, was born in Fresno, California, the son of a bank president. His parents’ names and details of his early life are unknown. He played on the Fresno High School baseball team in 1893 and subsequently played for Washington College in Irvington, California, where he studied dentistry....

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Clarke, Fred Clifford (03 October 1872–14 August 1960), baseball player and manager, was born in Winterset, Iowa, the son of William D. Clarke and Lucy Cutler, farmers. His brother was the major league outfielder Joshua Clarke. He attended Dickenson, Iowa, public schools and played left field for the Des Moines Stars and Mascots in the Newsboys League and in 1891 for the Carroll, Iowa, semipro club. His professional baseball career began in 1892 with Hastings of the Nebraska State League, continued in 1893 with St. Joseph, Missouri, of the Western Association and Montgomery, Alabama, of the Southern League, and in 1894 with Savannah of the Southern League....

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Cobb, Ty (18 December 1886–17 July 1961), baseball player and manager, was born Tyrus Raymond Cobb in Banks County in northeastern Georgia, the son of William Herschel Cobb and Amanda Chitwood. When Cobb was about six years old, his father, an itinerant schoolmaster, moved the family to Royston in Franklin County. There, William Herschel Cobb served not only as school principal but as editor of the town newspaper, county school superintendent, and, for one term, state senator. Meanwhile, young Tyrus grew up under the demands of being “Professor Cobb’s boy,” with little enthusiasm for schoolwork but a developing passion for baseball....

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Collins, Eddie (02 May 1887–25 March 1951), baseball player, coach, and executive, was born Edward Trowbridge Collins in Millerton, New York, the son of John Rossman Collins, a railroad freight agent, and Mary Meade Trowbridge. Collins spent his first years in Millerton before the family moved to Tarrytown, New York, where he attended school. He enrolled at Columbia University in 1903....

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Connor, Roger (01 July 1857–04 January 1931), baseball player, manager, and owner, was born in Waterbury, Connecticut. Nothing is known about his parents except that they were Irish immigrants from County Kerry. His younger brother Joseph was a catcher with five different major league teams. Connor was educated in the Waterbury school system, and he married a local woman, with whom he adopted one child....

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Dahlen, Bill (05 January 1870–05 December 1950), baseball player and manager, was born William Frederick Dahlen in Nelliston, New York, near Cooperstown, the son of a masonry contractor. His parents’ names are unknown. He graduated from Fort Plain (N.Y.) High School and played baseball for two years at the Clinton (N.Y.) Liberal Institute. Dahlen joined the Cobbleskill, New York, team in the New York State League in 1890. He played second base and made 137 hits in only 85 games for a .342 batting average. His excellent play caught the attention of a friend of ...

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Davis, George Stacey (23 August 1870–17 October 1940), baseball player and manager, was born in Cohoes, New York, the son of Abram Davis and Sarah Healy. Nothing is known of the circumstances of his family or the extent of his formal education. Davis’s life in baseball began in 1889 with an Albany, New York, independent minor league team. In 1890 he became an outfielder with the Cleveland Spiders of the National League, where he played for three seasons with good but unremarkable performance. In 1893 Cleveland traded Davis to the New York Giants for future Hall of Famer ...

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Dean, Dizzy (16 January 1910–17 July 1974), baseball player, coach, and broadcaster, was born Jay Hanna Dean in Lucas, Arkansas, the son of Albert Dean and Alma Nelson, both migrant workers. “Dizzy,” a nickname he acquired from his zany antics, had a younger brother, Paul, who also pitched in the major leagues. There has been some uncertainty about Dean’s birthdate, birthplace, and baptismal name. According to Dean, the biographical confusion might stem from the fact that he liked to give every reporter a scoop. Dean said his other name, Jerome Herman, was adopted when he was seven years old. A playmate by that name died, and to console the boy’s father, Dean said that he would take the youth’s name as his own....

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Ewing, Buck (17 October 1859?–20 October 1906), baseball player and manager, was born William Ewing near Cincinnati in either Hoaglands or Russell Station, Ohio. His parents’ names are unknown. He acquired his nickname from boyhood friends and may have worked as a teamster before becoming a professional ballplayer. His baseball career began about 1878 with top amateur teams in southern Ohio, including the Mohawk Browns and Cincinnati Buckeyes. Primarily a catcher, Ewing was such a gifted athlete that he often filled in at other positions, a practice he would continue in the major leagues....

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Frisch, Frank Francis (09 September 1898–12 March 1973), baseball player and manager, was born in either Queens or Bronx, New York, the son of Franz Frisch, a German immigrant, and Katherine Stahl. Franz Frisch climbed from store clerk to successful linen merchant. Frank excelled in baseball, football, and basketball at Fordham Jesuit Preparatory School and captained teams in the same sports at Fordham University until the New York Giants signed him to a baseball contract after his junior year for $400 per month and a $200 signing bonus....

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Griffith, Clark Calvin (20 November 1869–27 October 1955), baseball player, manager, and owner, was born in Clearcreek, Missouri, the son of Isaiah Griffith, a fur trapper, and Sarah Wright. His parents moved to Clearcreek just two years before Clark was born. His father died in an accidental shooting when Clark was only two, and by age ten he had become a professional trapper to help his mother. By age thirteen, however, Griffith contracted malaria, forcing his family to move to Bloomington, Illinois, where he recovered his health....

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Hamilton, Billy (16 February 1866–15 December 1940), baseball player and manager, was born William Robert Hamilton in Newark, New Jersey, the son of Samuel Hamilton, a cotton mill worker, and Mary McCutchin. He grew up in Clinton, Massachusetts, where he worked with his father in the mill. Though it is reputed that he signed his first contract with Waterbury, Connecticut, of the Eastern League in 1886, his name never appeared in a box score. Hamilton played his first three seasons in the New England League, batting .380 for Lawrence, Massachusetts, in 1886 and for Salem, Massachusetts, the following season. The 5′ 6½″, 165-pound outfielder was hitting .352 in 61 games for Worcester, Massachusetts, in 1888 when he was sold to Kansas City of the American Association. Hamilton finished the 1888 season with Kansas City, playing in 35 games and compiling a .264 batting mark, his only sub .300 season until his final season in the major leagues....

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Hanlon, Ned (22 August 1857–14 April 1937), baseball player, manager, and executive, was born Edward Hugh Hanlon in Montville, Connecticut, the son of a house builder. Hanlon attended public school at Montville but quit in 1873 to play baseball. He played for three semiprofessional teams in Connecticut before beginning his professional career in 1876 with Providence, Rhode Island, of the New England League. From 1876 to 1879 Hanlon played for three minor league teams, including a strong Albany, New York, team that won the Eastern League championship in 1879....

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Harris, Bucky (08 November 1896–08 November 1977), baseball player and manager, was born Stanley Raymond Harris in Port Jervis, New York, the son of Thomas Harris, a coal miner, and Katherine Rupp. In 1901 the family moved to Pittstown, Pennsylvania, where at age 13 Harris worked full-time as a breaker boy and later became an assistant weighmaster at the Butler colliery. Despite his diminutive size at the time, the 14-year-old Harris played semiprofessional baseball with men. A right-handed batting infielder, he played with the Scranton team against the New York Yankees in a 1915 exhibition game in which his performance won him a tryout with the Detroit Tigers. ...

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Hooper, Harry Bartholomew (24 August 1887–18 December 1974), baseball player, manager, and coach, was born at Elephant Head Homestead, California, the son of Joseph Hooper, a farmer, and Kathleen Keller. His parents were German immigrants who had settled as sharecroppers in the Santa Clara Valley. From 1889 to 1897 his family farmed at Garrison Ranch in the San Joaquin Valley, but economic hardship compelled the Hoopers to return to sharecropping in the Santa Clara Valley. After performing well academically at Volta Elementary School and Mendezable District Grammar School, he was given the opportunity to pursue further education. He excelled at St. Mary’s High School in Oakland, California; in 1907, at St. Mary’s College in the same city, he earned a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering. At St. Mary’s, Hooper starred for the baseball team and participated in several other sports. Before graduation, the 5′ 10″, 168-pounder briefly played outfield for Alameda of the California State League, which did business outside baseball’s national agreement. Hooper spent the remainder of the 1907 season and all of 1908 with Sacramento of the same league, earning $85 a month for playing baseball and $75 a month working as a surveyor for the Western Pacific Railroad. He considered himself primarily an engineer who played baseball for fun....

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Huggins, Miller James (27 March 1879?–25 September 1929), baseball player and manager, was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, the son of English immigrants James Thomas Huggins, a grocer, and Sarah Reid. Huggins was an excellent student who received a law (and probably a bachelor) degree from the University of Cincinnati, and he passed the Ohio bar examination in 1902, although he never pursued a law career....

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Jennings, Hugh Ambrose (02 April 1871–01 February 1928), baseball player and manager, was born in Pittston, Pennsylvania, the son of James Jennings, a coal miner. (His mother’s name is unknown.) Like his Irish immigrant father, Hughie, as everyone called him, went to work in the mines, starting at 90 cents a day. While still in school, however, he found that he could make five dollars a game playing baseball on Sundays, and he soon left the mines permanently. He was a good enough player that in 1890 he signed with Allentown of the Eastern Interstate League. Within a year he was promoted to Louisville of the American Association, and from 1893 to 1899 he starred for the famous Baltimore Orioles....