1-6 of 6 results  for:

  • composition x
  • strings player x
  • Results with images only x
Clear all

Article

Bull, Ole (05 February 1810–17 August 1880), concert violinist, composer, and patriot, was born Ole Bornemann Bull in Bergen, Norway, the son of Johan Storm Bull, an apothecary, and Anna Dorothea Geelmuyden. Musically precocious by age three, he was encouraged by his mother and his uncle, a good amateur cellist, who bought the child his first violin and persuaded the parents to engage an instructor, the closest brush Bull would have with formal violin study. Two years were spent with Johan H. Paulson, followed in 1822 by a six-year stint with Mathias Lundholm. Beyond this early foundation, Bull remained almost entirely self-taught, although he sometimes sought informal help from artists like Torgeir Augundson, the legendary Norwegian folk fiddler....

Article

Johnson, Francis (16 June 1792–06 April 1844), musician, bandleader, and composer, also known as Frank Johnson, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Little is known of his youth and parentage. Most sources cite Martinique as his birthplace, but Stephen Charpié's (1999) work with baptismal records establishes his birth date, birthplace, and status as a free African American. Though skilled at a number of instruments, Johnson seems to have first attained local prominence as a fiddler at dances, parties, and the like; there is some evidence that he played with Matthew “Matt” Black's band in the late 1810s. Johnson also seems to have received some limited instruction during this period from Richard Willis, an Irish immigrant who later directed the West Point military band and who introduced the keyed bugle (also known as a Kent bugle) to the United States....

Article

Kreisler, Fritz (02 February 1875–29 January 1962), violinist and composer, was born Friedrich Kreisler in Vienna, Austria, the son of Samuel Severin Kreisler, a general medical practitioner and amateur violinist, and Anna (maiden name unknown). Fritz’s father and musical friends devoted Saturday afternoons to string quartet playing. Young Fritz listened, and at age four, having successfully played the national anthem on a toy violin for the Saturday group, he received a genuine small violin from his father. Jacques Auber, concertmaster at the Ring Theater and a friend of Dr. Kreisler, agreed to teach Fritz, who made rapid progress. In 1882 Kreisler was admitted to the Vienna Conservatory. He studied violin with Joseph Hellmesberger, Jr., and studied harmony and theory with Anton Bruckner. Kreisler’s piano skills, much lauded by colleagues in later years, were self-taught while he was at the conservatory. Kreisler gave his first public violin performance in 1884 in a conservatory concert, and in 1885 he won first prize for violinists, the conservatory’s gold medal, which was an unprecedented accomplishment for a ten-year-old....

Article

Loeffler, Charles Martin (30 January 1861–19 May 1935), composer and violinist, was born near Berlin, Germany, the son of Dr. Karl Löffler, a writer and agricultural scientist, and Helena Schwerdtmann. His father’s professional expertise was in demand in various sugar-producing regions of Europe. Thus, as he was growing up, Loeffler lived with his family in several towns in Germany and in France, Hungary, and Russia. As a child he was educated principally at home, although he recalled receiving his first violin lessons in Smela in Ukraine. Loeffler attended the Hochschule für Musik in Berlin from 1874 to 1877; there he studied violin with Joseph Joachim. In Paris he studied violin with Lambert Joseph Massart and composition with Ernest Guiraud. Loeffler played for one year in the Pasdeloup Orchestra in Paris, after which he was a member of the private orchestra of Baron Paul von Derwies in France and Switzerland from 1879 to 1881....

Article

Pettiford, Oscar (30 September 1922–08 September 1960), composer and musician, was born in Okmulgee, Oklahoma, the son of Harry “Doc” Pettiford, a veterinarian and amateur guitarist of African-American and Cherokee descent, and Leontine Bell, a music teacher and pianist who was a full-blooded Choctaw. Pettiford’s father gave up his career in the 1920s, and the family moved to Minneapolis to form what would later become an outstanding regional band. All eleven children contributed, the older ones generally playing instruments and the younger singing. Ira, on the trumpet, eventually worked with ...

Article

Piatigorsky, Gregor (17 April 1903–06 August 1976), cellist and composer, was born in Ekaterinoslav in what is now Ukraine, the son of Paul Piatigorsky and Marie (maiden name unknown). He began to play the cello at age seven, taught by his father, an aspiring violinist. In 1911, recognized as a prodigy, Piatigorsky was awarded a scholarship for study at the Moscow Conservatory under Alfred von Glehn; he soon began to play in the Zimin Opera orchestra and elsewhere to eke out a living. In 1917 Piatigorsky debuted as a soloist. Two years later he competed successfully to become principal cellist of the Bolshoi Theater Orchestra and also joined the newly formed Lenin String Quartet, sponsored by the new regime. From 1919 to 1921 Piatigorsky’s career flourished, as he played solo and sonata recitals and chamber music concerts with many leading Russian musicians of the time. His devotion to the advancement of contemporary music, which remained a lifelong pursuit, led to his introducing many new works to Russian audiences, including Debussy’s Sonata for Cello and Piano, Ravel’s Piano Trio, and Prokofiev’s ...