You are looking at  1-20 of 22 articles  for:

  • Law and crime x
  • US representative x
  • Results with images only x
Clear All

Article

Barnard, Daniel Dewey (11 September 1796–24 April 1861), lawyer, congressman, and diplomat, was born in East Hartford, Connecticut, the son of Timothy Barnard, a county judge, and Phebe Dewey. Barnard’s early years were spent on the family farm near Hartford, Connecticut. When he was twelve the family moved to Mendon, New York (near Rochester). His formal education started with a year at Lenox Academy, after which he transferred to Williams College, where he graduated in 1818....

Article

Beck, James Montgomery (09 July 1861–12 April 1936), lawyer, solicitor general, and congressman, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of James Nathan Beck, the owner of a small music publishing company, and Margaretta C. Darling. Coming from modest financial means, Beck inherited his father’s interest in music and the family’s Moravian antiwar and communitarian heritage, which contributed to his early pacifism and anticorporation viewpoints. Following matriculation at Philadelphia’s Episcopal Academy, Beck graduated from Moravian College in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, in 1880. After reading law, he began legal practice in 1884. From 1888 to 1892, he served as assistant U.S. attorney for eastern Pennsylvania. In 1890 he married Lilla Mitchell, daughter of a Philadelphia businessman, with whom he had two children....

Article

Benton, Thomas Hart (14 March 1782–10 April 1858), U.S. senator and congressman, was born near Hillsboro (now Hillsborough), North Carolina, the son of Jesse Benton, a lawyer and farmer, and Ann “Nancy” Gooch. Jesse Benton died in 1791, leaving eight children, considerable land, extensive debts, and an aristocratic lifestyle. The family suffered a further blow when Thomas Hart Benton, at age sixteen, was expelled from the University of North Carolina for misusing money entrusted to him by roommates. The future senator was known ever after for scrupulous honesty and belligerent defense of his honor; concern that the story of his expulsion might surface probably influenced his consistent refusals to be considered for the presidency....

Article

Elliott, Carl A. (20 December 1913–09 January 1999), U.S. congressman, was born Carl Atwood Elliott in Gober Ridge, Franklin County, Alabama, the son of G. W. “Will” Elliott, farmer, and Nora Massey Elliott. The oldest of nine children, he grew up on a hardscrabble tenant farm and became interested in politics at an early age. After attending local public schools, he entered the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa on a shoestring budget in 1930. His first night on campus was spent sleeping under a truck; he then lived in an abandoned building during his first year and a half of college. Despite his lack of means, Elliott managed to support himself by working a variety of odd jobs. His success on campus was marked by his election as class president during his senior year. Upon graduating in 1933, he entered law school at Alabama and received his law degree in 1936....

Article

Gore, Albert, Sr. (26 December 1907–05 December 1998), U.S. senator, was born near Granville, Tennessee, the son of Allen Gore, a farmer, and Margie Denny Gore. He attended local one-room country schools and graduated from high school in nearby Gordonsville, after which he taught high school in Smith and Overton counties. He graduated with a B.S. from Middle Tennessee State Teachers College (now Middle Tennessee State University) in 1932 and in that same year lost his first attempt at elective office (superintendent of schools for Smith county). When his opponent died after a year in office, Gore was named to the post and served until 1936. By this time smitten with politics, Gore furthered his education by attending night law school at the Nashville YMCA. After three years of long-distance commuting from Carthage, he received his LL.B. in 1936. Admitted to the bar that year, he began practicing law in Carthage with his future wife, Pauline La Fon, whom he had met in Nashville while she was waitressing her way through Vanderbilt University Law School. Married on 27 April 1937, the couple had two children....

Article

Hindman, Thomas Carmichael (28 January 1828–27 September 1868), general and congressman, was born in Knoxville, Tennessee, the son of Thomas Carmichael Hindman and Sallie Holt. His father moved to Jacksonville, Alabama, in 1832 as an Indian agent of the federal government and then to Ripley, Tippah County, Mississippi, in 1841, where he operated a large plantation. As the son of a well-to-do family, Hindman attended a variety of local private schools and graduated in 1846 from the Lawrenceville Classical and Commercial Institute located near Princeton, New Jersey....

Article

Hruska, Roman (16 August 1904–25 April 1999), attorney, representative, and U.S. senator, was born Roman Lee Hruska in David City, Butler County, Nebraska, the son of Joseph C. Hruska, a schoolteacher, and Caroline L. Dvorak Hruska. He attended local public schools before entering the University of Omaha (now the University of Nebraska–Omaha) where he took a prelaw course. Hruska also studied at the University of Chicago before finally, in 1929, receiving his LL.B. from Creighton University School of Law and passing the state bar. On 24 September 1930 he married Victoria E. Kuncl of Omaha; the couple had three children....

Article

Jackson, James (21 September 1757–19 March 1806), congressman, U.S. senator, and governor of Georgia, was born in Moreton Hampstead, Devonshire, England, the son of James Jackson, Sr., and Mary Webber, about whom nothing is known. At age fifteen he immigrated alone to Savannah, Georgia, where lawyer John Wereat took him in. Young Jackson received no formal education, but within the next few years the American Revolution transformed and gave focus to his life. In 1777 he was a delegate to the Georgia Constitutional Convention. More notably, he served in the state militia, fought in numerous engagements, including Cowpens in 1781, and became a major general in 1792. For his leadership of the patriot forces that repossessed Savannah after the British departure in July 1782, the assembly awarded him a house and lot in the town. In 1785 he married Mary Charlotte Young; they had five sons. By 1796 Jackson’s estate had grown to include several thousand acres of rice and cotton producing lands, including 4,594 acres from grants made to him by Georgia governors in recognition of war service. Showing little interest in selling this domain, he apparently was immune from the land speculation fever of his day. After studying with ...

Article

Jordan, Barbara (21 February 1936–17 January 1996), lawyer, politician, and university professor, was born Barbara Charline Jordan in Houston, Texas, the daughter of Benjamin M. Jordan and Arlyne Patten Jordan. Her father, a graduate of the Tuskegee Institute, was a warehouse employee until 1949 when he became a minister at Houston's Good Hope Missionary Baptist Church, in which his father's family had long been active. Arlyne Jordan also became a frequent speaker at the church. The Jordans were always poor, and for many years Barbara and her two older sisters shared a bed, but their lives improved somewhat after their father became a minister. Barbara attended local segregated public schools and received good grades with little effort. She gave scant thought to her future, beyond forming a vague desire to become a pharmacist, until her senior year at Phillis Wheatley High School, when a black female lawyer spoke at the school's career day assembly. Already a proficient orator who had won several competitions, she decided to put that skill to use as an attorney....

Article

Keating, Kenneth Barnard (18 May 1900–05 May 1975), congressman, senator, ambassador, and judge, was born in Lima, New York, the son of Thomas Mosgrove Keating, a local businessman, and Louise Barnard, a schoolteacher. Much of Keating’s early education was at Genesee Wesleyan Seminary in Lima, New York. He then attended the University of Rochester (N.Y.), from which he graduated in 1919, and Harvard Law School, which granted him an LL.B. in 1923. From that date until he entered the U.S. Congress in 1947 Keating was active in the law firm of Harris, Beach, Wilcox and Dale, earning a reputation as an adroit trial lawyer. In 1928 Keating married Louise Depuy; they had one daughter....

Article

Lacey, John Fletcher (30 May 1841–29 September 1913), lawyer and congressman, was born in New Martinsville, Virginia, an Ohio River settlement in what later became West Virginia, the son of John Mills Lacey, a brick and stonemason, and Eleanor Patten. In 1853 the family moved to nearby Wheeling, then two years later to Oskaloosa, Iowa. Hard work marked Lacey’s passage to adulthood in Iowa. He labored at his father’s trade and on the family farm, boarded out to study in a succession of small, lonely academies, and spent two winters as an itinerant schoolmaster. Upon hearing of the firing on Fort Sumter, he immediately joined a volunteer company and, on his twentieth birthday, marched off to war....

Article

Lanham, Fritz (03 January 1880–31 July 1965), lawyer and U.S. congressman, was born Frederick Garland Lanham in Weatherford, Texas, the son of Samuel Willis Tucker Lanham, a lawyer and politician, and Sarah Beona Meng, a schoolteacher and artist. Lanham’s childhood education was divided between public schools in Washington, D.C., and Weatherford College, where he graduated in 1897. He attended Vanderbilt University for the fall semester in 1897 but returned home and taught Greek at Weatherford College in the spring of 1898. That fall he enrolled at the University of Texas, and in 1900 he graduated with a B.A. As a postgraduate student, Lanham was selected as the first editor of the ...

Article

Mahon, George Herman (22 September 1900–19 November 1985), lawyer and member of Congress, was born in Mahon, Louisiana, the son of John Kirkpatrick, a cotton farmer, and Lola Willis Brown. His family moved to Loraine, Texas, located between Big Spring and Abilene in the western part of the state, when Mahon was eight. Educated locally, he also taught at a grammar school during his senior year in high school, riding fourteen miles by bicycle. He graduated from Simmons University (now Hardin-Simmons) in 1924. He received a law degree from the University of Texas at Austin in 1925. Mahon married Helen Stevenson in 1923; the couple had one child. The voters chose Mahon as county attorney for Mitchell County in 1926. Ten months later the governor appointed him district attorney of the Thirty-second Judicial District. He served from 1927 to 1933....

Article

Mills, Ogden Livingston (23 August 1884–11 October 1937), lawyer, legislator, and secretary of the treasury, was born in Newport, Rhode Island, the son of Ogden Mills, a business entrepreneur, and Ruth T. Livingston. His father’s family had made a fortune in California following the gold rush of 1849. Mills attended the Browning School in New York City and in 1901 was admitted to Harvard University, where he received his A.B. in 1905. He remained at Harvard to study law and was awarded the LL.B. in 1907. Admitted to the New York bar in 1908, he joined the important firm of Stetson, Jennings and Russell in New York City....

Article

Mondell, Frank Wheeler (06 November 1860–06 August 1939), congressman, mine operator, and lawyer, was born in St. Louis, Missouri, the son of Ephraim Wheeler Mondell, a laborer, and Nancy Brown. Orphaned at the age of six, Frank lived for a short time with relatives in Iowa. When he was eight, he moved with an itinerant Congregational minister named Upton to Dickinson County, Iowa. Mondell did not graduate from high school and, at the age of eighteen, held various jobs in Chicago for a year, then migrated to Colorado in 1879. For the next eight years, he pursued employment in engineering and construction projects, roaming over a ten-state area. In 1887 the Kilpatrick Brothers and Collins, railroad contractors from Beatrice, Nebraska, hired Mondell to prospect for coal in northeastern Wyoming. His discovery in 1886 of a major bituminous coal deposit at Cambria altered his life. Mondell became the mine manager at Cambria. In 1889 the town of Newcastle, Wyoming, was surveyed, and Mondell became Newcastle’s first mayor, 1889–1895. Concurrently with his mayoralty, he served two terms in the Wyoming State Senate, 1890–1894; he was elected president of the senate in 1893 and declined that position in 1894....

Article

Pujo, Arsene Paulin (16 December 1861–31 December 1939), attorney and congressman, was born in Rose Bluff, Louisiana, the son of Paul Pujo, a merchant, and Eloise Minerva LeBleu. His father emigrated from Tarbes, France, in 1839 and settled in Lake Charles in 1849. His mother was born in Chloe, a nearby community settled by her family. Pujo attended local public and private schools, read law in the offices of Gabriel A. Fournet, and in 1886 was admitted to the bar. In 1889 he married Augusta “Gussie” Brown; they had two daughters. Pujo maintained a successful legal practice, served as a bank director and president, and held numerous positions in civic organizations and the Democratic party....

Article

Smith, Caleb Blood (16 April 1808–07 January 1864), lawyer, congressman, and secretary of the interior, was born in Boston, Massachusetts; his parents’ names are unknown. When he was six years old, he moved with his parents to Cincinnati, Ohio. This city of ten thousand was on its way to becoming the “Queen City of the West,” and Smith formed much of his lifelong thinking while living there. During 1825 and 1826 he attended Miami University at Oxford, Ohio. He did not graduate but returned briefly to Cincinnati and then left Ohio for Connersville, Indiana, to study law with ...

Article

Smith, Truman (27 November 1791–03 May 1884), lawyer and congressman, was born in Roxbury, Connecticut, the son of Phineas Smith and Deborah Ann Judson, farmers. He was the nephew of Nathan Smith, a U.S. senator, and Nathaniel Smith, a U.S. representative. Tutored by the Reverend Daniel Parker, he entered Yale College and graduated in 1815. He then studied at the Litchfield Law School, where his uncles had matriculated, and in 1818 he began to practice his profession....

Article

Story, Joseph (18 September 1779–10 September 1845), U.S. Supreme Court justice, legal scholar, law professor, and congressman, was born in Marblehead, Massachusetts, the son of Elisha Story, a prominent physician and surgeon, and Mehitable Pedrick, the daughter of a wealthy Loyalist merchant who lost most of his fortune during the Revolution. Story’s father was an early patriot and a member of the Sons of Liberty. He participated in the Boston Tea Party and later served at Lexington, Concord, Bunker Hill, Long Island, White Plains, and Trenton. Growing up in the aftermath of the Revolution, Joseph absorbed from both of his parents republican values, Unitarian theology, a heritage of Puritan idealism, a fierce sense of nationalism, and an unbending dedication to public service....

Article

Taber, John (05 May 1880–22 November 1965), lawyer and U.S. representative, was born in Auburn, New York, the son of Franklin P. Taber, an attorney and businessman, and Mary Parker. Educated in the public schools of Auburn, Taber went on to Yale, receiving his B.A. in 1902. He attended the New York Law School, was admitted to the state bar in 1904, and joined his father’s Auburn firm. In 1918 he started his own practice....