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Brinkley, David (10 July 1920–11 June 2003), broadcast journalist, was born David McClure Brinkley in Wilmington, North Carolina, the son of William Graham Brinkley, a railroad worker, and Mary MacDonald West. Brinkley's father died when the boy was eight, leaving him in the care of a dour, deeply religious mother. Brinkley, seeking escape through reading, spent hours at the Wilmington Public Library. He also enjoyed writing. Encouraged by his high school English teacher, Brinkley worked part‐time at Wilmington's afternoon newspaper, the ...

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Huntley, Chet (10 December 1911–20 March 1974), broadcast journalist, was born Chester Robert Huntley in Cardwell, Montana, the son of Percy Adams “Pat” Huntley, a railroad telegrapher, and Blanche Wadine Tatham, a former schoolteacher. In 1913 his parents claimed a homestead on 960 acres of land near Saco in northern Montana. Chet’s earliest memories were of farm chores, and his early schooling was in a one-room schoolhouse built on a corner of his parents’ land, where he was taught to read by phonics (sounding out letters), a system he later advocated....

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Murrow, Edward R. (25 April 1908–27 April 1965), broadcast journalist, was born Egbert Roscoe Murrow in Polecat Creek, near Greensboro, North Carolina, the son of Roscoe Murrow, a farmer and later an engineer on a logging railroad, and Ethel Lamb, a teacher. The Murrow family soon traveled to the state of Washington, which was still thought of as a frontier, full of labor strikes and conflicts over free speech, trade unionism, and legislative reform....

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Sevareid, Eric (26 November 1912–09 July 1992), journalist and author, was born Arnold Eric Sevareid in Velva, North Dakota, the son of Alfred Eric Sevareid, a bank teller, and Clare Pauline Elizabeth Hougen. He enjoyed setting type at the weekly Velva Journal, owned by a friend of his father’s. When wheat-killing droughts closed many local banks, the Sevareids moved in 1925 to Minot, North Dakota, and a year later to Minneapolis, where Sevareid attended high school. He said that the only thing he learned there was how to manage the school paper. Upon his graduation in 1930 Sevareid and a friend took a 2,200-mile canoe trip from Minneapolis to York Factory on Hudson Bay. (He later wrote a book for juveniles based on this adventure, titled ...