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Kalakaua, David Laamea (16 November 1836–20 January 1891), king of the Hawaiian Islands, was born in Honolulu, the son of the high chief Kahanu Kapaakea and the high chiefess Analea Keohokalole. The infant was adopted, according to Hawaiian custom, by the chiefess Haaheo Kaniu, who took him to the court of King ...

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Kamehameha I (1758–05 May 1819), unifier of the Hawaiian Islands, was born in Kohala, Hawaii. His lineage is disputed, with three men listed as his possible father: Kalani-Kupu-A-Keoua, Keouakalani, and Kahekili, the king of Maui. Although Kekuiapoiwa was his mother, he probably was adopted at birth by Naeole, who is credited with caring for him during the first five years of his life. Shortly before the birth of Kamehameha, a comet had appeared in the sky in 1758, which was interpreted by the kahunas (priests) to mean that the mightiest ruler of Hawaii was about to be born. Seeing this as a threat to his power, King Alapai, uncle of Kekuiapoiwa, ordered that her child be killed at birth. For this reason she had entrusted her newborn son, Kamehameha, to chief Naeole, who, with his sister Kakunuialaimoku, raised Kamehameha in secret until Alapai relented and allowed the child to be brought back to court. Kamehameha, whose name means the Lonely One, was not in line to inherit the kingdom in Kohala. As Kamehameha was growing up, the islands were divided into four kingdoms, each ruled by an alii-aimoku (ruling chief). The most significant of these chiefs were Kalaniopuu, of Hawaii (the largest island in the Hawaiian chain), who was the uncle of Kamehameha; and Kahekili. Kamehameha grew up in the court of his uncle Kalaniopuu. When Kalaniopuu died in 1782, his power was divided between Kamehameha, who was given guardianship of the war god Kukailimoku, and Kalaniopuu’s natural son Kiwalao, who inherited the kingship....

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Kamehameha V (11 December 1830–11 December 1872), king of Hawaii, was born Lot, the third son of Kinau, a daughter of Kamehameha the Great, and Mataio Kekuanaoa. Kinau was the half sister of Kamehameha II (Liholiho) and Kamehameha III (Kauikeaouli). When the two children of Kamehameha III died in infancy, he adopted the children of Kinau as his heirs; ...

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Kuhio (26 March 1871–07 January 1922), prince of Hawaii and the islands' second territorial delegate to the U.S. Congress, prince of Hawaii and the islands’ second territorial delegate to the U.S. Congress, was born Jonah Kuhio Kalanianaole Piikoi at Kola, Kauai, to Princess Kekaulike Kinoike II and high chief David Kahalepouli Piikoi. His mother was related to the ancient kings of Maui and Hawaii, and her grandfather was King Kaumualii of Kauai....

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Liliuokalani (02 September 1838–11 November 1917), last sovereign queen of Hawaii, was born in Honolulu, the daughter of high chief Kapaakea and the chiefess, Keohokalole. Her father had been a close adviser of King Kamehameha III. Lydia, as she was named, was hanaied...