1-15 of 15 results  for:

  • army officer (US, 1866-) x
  • army officer (US civil war - Union) x
  • Results with images only x
Clear all

Article

Bendire, Charles Emil (27 April 1836–04 February 1897), naturalist and soldier, was born Karl Emil Bender at König im Odenwald in Hesse-Darmstadt (now in Germany). The identities of his parents are not known. At age twelve he began his studies at a theological seminary in Passy, France. Misconduct led to his departure five years later. In 1853 he immigrated to the United States and anglicized his name to Charles Bendire. The following year he joined the First Dragoons in the U.S. Army. During his second enlistment, which began in 1860, he became a sergeant and later hospital steward in the Fourth Cavalry....

Article

Billings, John Shaw (12 April 1838–11 March 1913), army medical officer, library organizer, and public health activist, was born near Allensville, Indiana, the son of James Billings, a farmer and storekeeper, and Abby Shaw. Despite spotty secondary schooling, he ultimately went to Miami College (Ohio), where he earned his B.A. in 1857. He was awarded the M.D. by the Medical College of Ohio in 1860. Billings remained with the latter institution for a year as an anatomical demonstrator, but after the outbreak of the Civil War he joined the U.S. Army as a contract surgeon. In 1862 he was commissioned first lieutenant and assistant surgeon and went on to make army service his career. Also in 1862 he married Katharine Mary Stevens; they had five children....

Article

Carr, Eugene Asa (20 March 1830–02 December 1910), army officer, was born in Concord, Erie County, New York, the son of Clark Murwin Carr and Delia Ann Torrey (occupations unknown). He entered the U.S. Military Academy in 1846, graduating four years later, nineteenth in his class of forty-four. Assigned to the Regiment of Mounted Rifles as a brevet second lieutenant, Carr received his regular commission on 30 June 1851. Joining his regiment at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri, he served in two military expeditions to the Rocky Mountains during 1852–1853. The following year, Carr was wounded while serving as second in command during Captain John A. Walker’s pursuit of Apaches west of newly created Fort Davis, Texas. Though his wound was initially presumed to be fatal, Carr recovered and was promoted to first lieutenant, First Cavalry Regiment....

Article

Chaffee, Adna Romanza (14 April 1842–01 November 1914), army officer, was born in Orwell, Ashtabula County, Ohio, the son of Truman Bibbins Chaffee and Grace Hyde, farmers. He was raised on his father’s farm, receiving only a rudimentary education. Upon the outbreak of the Civil War, Chaffee left home intending to join an Ohio regiment, but he met the Sixth U.S. Cavalry and enlisted as a private on 22 July 1861. He rode with the Sixth for the next twenty-seven years. By dint of good soldiering, Chaffee became sergeant within weeks and, following service in the Peninsula and Antietam campaigns, rose to first sergeant. On 12 May 1863 he was commissioned second lieutenant at the behest of Secretary of War ...

Article

Custer, George Armstrong (05 December 1839–25 June 1876), Civil War general and Indian fighter, was born in New Rumley, Ohio, the son of Emanuel Custer and Maria Ward, farmers. Reared in the rough-and-tumble environment of a large, rural family, “Autie” was a strapping, energetic youth who enjoyed hunting, fishing, and practical jokes and valued romantic novels over academic studies. From his family he acquired a strong affinity for Methodism and the Democratic party. Custer was educated at Stebbins Academy in Monroe, Michigan, where he lived part time with a half sister, and at McNeely Normal School in Hopedale, Ohio, and then taught briefly at two country schools in Ohio before winning, at age seventeen, an appointment to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. Entering in June 1857, he graduated four years later, at the outbreak of the Civil War. His academic and conduct record at West Point was as dismal as his record in the combat arts was outstanding. Graduating at the foot of his class of thirty-four, he was commissioned second lieutenant in the Second U.S. Cavalry in time to take part in the first battle of Manassas....

Article

Dix, John Adams (24 July 1798–21 April 1879), politician and general, was born in Boscawen, New Hampshire, the son of Timothy Dix, a merchant, and Abigail Wilkins. He received a varied liberal education, including a year at Phillips Exeter Academy and fifteen months at the College of Montreal. At age fourteen, while being tutored in Boston, Dix pleaded to join the army to defend the nation in the War of 1812. His father, a major, helped him to obtain a commission, and he served in battles at Chrysler’s Field (1813) and Lundy’s Lane (1814). His father’s death during the war caused Dix to stay in the army to help support his stepmother and siblings. Serving as an aide to Major General ...

Article

Forwood, William Henry (07 September 1838–11 May 1915), army medical officer, was born in Brandywine Hundred, Delaware, the son of Robert Forwood and Rachel Way Larkin (occupations unknown). He attended both private and public schools before entering the University of Pennsylvania, where he received his medical degree in 1861. He was commissioned as an assistant surgeon and first lieutenant in the Union Army Medical Department on 5 August of that year....

Article

Greely, Adolphus Washington (27 March 1844–20 October 1935), soldier and arctic explorer, was born in Newburyport, Massachusetts, the son of John Balch Greely, a shoemaker, and Frances D. Cobb, a cotton mill weaver. Greely graduated from Brown High School, Newburyport, in 1860, and in the following year, at the age of seventeen, he joined the Nineteenth Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. He served as a private, corporal, and first sergeant and was hospitalized for wounds sustained at Antietam, including a facial injury, which he covered with a beard for the remainder of his life. On furlough in 1863 he accepted a commission as a second lieutenant in the Fourth U.S. Volunteers (later Eighty-first U.S. Colored Infantry), stationed in Louisiana....

Article

Hazen, William Babcock (27 September 1830–16 January 1887), army career officer, was born in West Hartford, Vermont, the son of Stillman Hazen and Sophrona Fenno, farmers. In 1833 the family moved to Hiram, Ohio. Growing up on a farm there, Hazen became a friend and schoolmate of future president ...

Article

MacArthur, Arthur (02 June 1845–05 September 1912), army general, was born in Springfield, Massachusetts, the son of Judge Arthur MacArthur and Aurelia Belcher. Soon after his birth, his family moved to Milwaukee, where his father then served as lieutenant governor and governor of Wisconsin....

Article

Miles, Nelson Appleton (08 August 1839–15 May 1925), soldier, was born in Westminster, Massachusetts, the son of Daniel Miles, Jr., a farmer and businessman, and Mary Curtis. With options limited in the rural township of Westminster, Nelson Miles moved to Boston while still a teenager and worked in a store. Following the first battle of Bull Run (Manassas), he borrowed enough money to organize and outfit a company of volunteers. The men elected their benefactor captain, but Governor ...

Article

Shafter, William Rufus (16 October 1835–12 November 1906), military officer, was born in Galesburg, Michigan, the son of Hugh Morris Shafter, a pioneer farmer, and Eliza Summer. Growing up in western Michigan when the region was emerging from its frontier past, he received enough education to meet the modest requirements in 1856 to become a country school teacher....

Article

Sheridan, Philip Henry (06 March 1831–05 August 1888), U.S. Army general, was born while his family was en route from Ireland to Somerset, Ohio, the son of John Sheridan, a laborer, and Mary Meenagh. In 1830 John Sheridan had sold his leasehold on a small farm in County Cavan in north-central Ireland and bought passage to the United States. The following year, after finding no opportunities at Albany, New York, he was given work on the National Road—then being extended toward St. Louis, Missouri—and settled in the village of Somerset, Ohio. Whether Philip was born at sea, in Albany, or in Somerset has never been clearly established....

Article

Sherman, William Tecumseh (08 February 1820–14 February 1891), soldier, was born in Lancaster, Ohio, the son of Charles R. Sherman, a state judge, and Mary Hoyt. His father died when Sherman was nine years old, leaving the family penniless. Sherman grew up in the family of ...

Article

Upton, Emory (27 August 1839–15 March 1881), army officer, was born near Batavia, New York, the son of Daniel Upton and Electra Randall, farmers. In 1854 Upton entered Oberlin College, an antislavery stronghold in Ohio, where he attended classes with blacks and women. In 1856 he received an appointment to West Point, where ...