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Dean, Arthur Hobson (16 October 1898–30 November 1987), lawyer, government adviser, and diplomat, was born in Ithaca, New York, the son of William Cameron Dean, an engineering laboratory assistant, and Maud Campbell Egan. In 1915 Dean enrolled at Cornell University, where he earned money for expenses working as a night clerk at a hotel and as a bookkeeper at a bank. He interrupted his studies to serve in the navy during World War I. Returning to Cornell following peace, Dean received his A.B. in 1921. He then studied law at Cornell, where he was managing editor of the ...

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Donelson, Andrew Jackson (25 August 1799–26 June 1871), presidential aide, diplomat, and politician, was born near Nashville, Tennessee, the son of Samuel Donelson, who kept a store in partnership with his brother-in-law Andrew Jackson, and Mary Smith. In 1805 Jackson became his namesake’s guardian, Donelson’s father having died and his mother having remarried. Raised at the “Hermitage,” Donelson studied at Cumberland College in Nashville and later at the U.S. Military Academy. In 1820, after only three years, he graduated from West Point, second in his class. He subsequently served Jackson, by then territorial governor of Florida, as aide-de-camp. Donelson left the army in 1822 to study law at Transylvania University in Kentucky. Admitted to the bar the following year, he established a practice in Nashville. In 1824 he married a cousin, Emily Tennessee Donelson, whose dowry included both land and slaves. Establishing their home adjacent to the Hermitage, the couple eventually had four children....

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Graham, John (1774–06 August 1820), diplomat and public official, was born in Dumfries, Virginia, the son of Richard Graham, a prosperous Scot merchant, and Jane Brent. He attended Columbia College, graduating in 1790. Graham subsequently moved to Mason County in northeastern Kentucky and in 1800 represented the area in the state legislature. He had earlier married Susan Hill; they had four children....

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Greene, Roger Sherman (29 May 1881–27 March 1947), diplomat, medical administrator, and lobbyist, was born in Westborough, Massachusetts, the son of Daniel Crosby Greene and Mary Jane Forbes, two of the earliest American missionaries to work in Japan. He received his early education in Japan, where he spent most of his life before college. At Harvard University he earned an A.B. in 1901 and an A.M. in 1902....

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Loomis, Francis Butler (27 July 1861–04 August 1948), journalist, diplomat, and foreign trade adviser, was born in Marietta, Ohio, the son of William Butler Loomis, an Ohio state judge, and Harriet Frances Wheeler. Francis Loomis graduated from Marietta College in 1883. After graduation Loomis worked with the ...

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Wallace, Hugh Campbell (10 February 1863–01 January 1931), financier, politician, and diplomat, was born in Lexington, Missouri, the son of Thomas Bates Wallace, a wholesale merchant, and Lucy Briscoe. Wallace attended public and private schools in Lexington. His entrepreneurial spirit was evident in childhood, as he worked many jobs and organized numerous business enterprises. In 1885 President ...

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Owen Young. [left to right] C. C. Dill, Owen Young, and James Couzens, before the Senate Interstate Commerce Commission. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-98142).

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Young, Owen D. (27 October 1874–11 July 1962), lawyer, business leader, and public servant, was born in Van Hornesville, New York, the son of Jacob Smith Young and Ida Brandow, farmers. Enrolling in St. Lawrence University in 1890, he graduated in 1894. In 1896 he graduated from Boston University Law School cum laude, completing the three-year program in two years. From 1896 to 1903 Young taught evening classes in common-law pleading at the law school....