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Dunlap, Livingston (1799–10 September 1862), physician and civic leader, was born in Cherry Valley, New York. Little is known of his parentage other than that his father’s name was probably John Dunlap.

After arriving in Indianapolis from New York State in 1821, Dunlap formed a partnership with Samuel Mitchell, the city’s first physician. A medical student at the time, Dunlap studied medicine as an apprentice under Mitchell and became the third physician in Indianapolis. Like many physicians during this period, Dunlap set up a medical practice before obtaining his medical degree, which he received in 1830 from Transylvania University in Kentucky. In 1823 he married Georgiana McDougal; they had one child before her death. In 1849 he married Diantha Winslow; they had two children....

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Favill, Henry Baird (14 August 1860–20 February 1916), physician, civic leader, and farmer, was born in Madison, Wisconsin, the son of John Favill, a physician, and Louise Sophia Baird. Through his mother, Favill descended from the Ottawa chief, Kewinoquot (“Returning Cloud”), and took pride in this ancestry. Henry received his early education in the Madison schools, graduating from high school in 1876. He entered the University of Wisconsin that fall, took the classical course, and received his B.A. in 1880. Although his father had taken his M.D. at the Harvard Medical School, Favill entered Rush Medical College in the fall of 1880. For two years he served as prosector to Charles T. Parkes, professor of anatomy. His grades were so high that in his senior year he filled in at Cook County and St. Luke’s hospitals for several interns when they were ill or on vacation and so obtained valuable practical experience. He received his M.D. in 1883....

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McClennan, Alonzo Clifton (01 May 1855–04 October 1912), black physician and professional leader, was born in Columbia, South Carolina, the orphaned son of unknown parents. As with many African Americans of the post–Civil War era, it was Reconstruction that gave McClennan a chance at larger life. In 1872, at the height of the movement in South Carolina (and thanks to the influence of a guardian-uncle), he became a page in the black-dominated state senate. There he won the notice and friendship of influential legislator ...