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Bancroft, Edward (09 January 1744–08 September 1821), physician, scientist, and spy, was born in Westfield, Massachusetts, the son of Edward Bancroft and Mary Ely, farmers. The elder Bancroft died in 1746 of an epileptic attack suffered in a pigpen, two months before the birth of his younger son, Daniel. His widow married David Bull of Westfield in 1751, and the family moved to Hartford, Connecticut, where Bull operated the Bunch of Grapes tavern. Edward Bancroft was taught for a time by the recent Yale graduate ...

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Burnet, William (02 December 1730–07 October 1791), physician, judge, and member of the Continental Congress, was born in Lyon’s Farms, a town located between Newark and Elizabethtown, New Jersey, the son of Ichabod Burnet, a physician who emigrated from Scotland, and Hannah (maiden name unknown). He was educated at the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University) when it was located in Newark under Rev. ...

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Church, Benjamin (24 August 1734– January 1778?), physician, poet, and traitor, was born in Newport, Rhode Island, the son of Benjamin Church, a vendue master, and Hannah Dyer. By 1740 the family had moved to Boston, and in 1750 young Benjamin entered Harvard College. It was at Harvard that Church first developed his writing skills, sharpening his talents through biting satires on his classmates and the professors. After graduating in 1754, Church studied medicine and for several months in 1757 served as surgeon aboard the Massachusetts snow-of-war, the ...

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Dale, Thomas (1700–16 September 1750), physician, jurist, and poet, was born in Hoxton, England, to a gentry family with medical interests. His parents’ names are unknown. He attended Brasenose College, Oxford University, from 1717 to 1720 and in 1721 began study at the University of Leyden, from which he received a medical degree on 23 September 1723 for ...

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Dudley, Benjamin Winslow (12 April 1785–20 January 1870), surgeon and medical educator, was born in Spottsylvania County, Virginia, the son of the Reverend Ambrose Dudley, a Baptist minister, and Ann Parker Dudley. The couple moved with their seven children to Lexington, Kentucky, in 1786, when Benjamin was a year old (seven additional children were born to the Dudleys after the move to Lexington). Dudley’s medical education began in early 1800 under the mentorship of ...

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Elmer, Jonathan (29 November 1745–03 September 1817), physician, jurist, and legislator, was born in Cedarville, Cumberland County, New Jersey, the son of Daniel Elmer, a surveyor, and Abigail Lawrence. Jonathan was born into a locally prominent family. Because he was physically frail, it was decided to give the boy a classical education. He was probably tutored by his grandfather, the Presbyterian minister Daniel Elmer, and also by the Reverend William Ramsay, whose death Jonathan eulogized in print in 1772. Ramsay apparently instilled in him the dual influences of republican ideology and New Light presbyterianism....

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Kilty, William (1757–10 October 1821), jurist and army surgeon, was born in London, England, the son of Captain John Kilty, a merchant seaman, and Ellen Ahearn. Raised in London, Kilty was educated at the College of St. Omer in France. He accompanied his family to Maryland around 1774, settling in Annapolis, where he studied medicine under Dr. Edward Johnson....

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Marsh, John (05 June 1799–24 September 1856), California ranchero and physician, was born in Danvers, Massachusetts, the son of John Marsh and Mary “Polly” Brown, farmers. After graduating from Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts, in 1819, Marsh received his B.A. from Harvard in 1823. That year he accepted an appointment as a tutor at Fort St. Anthony (later Fort Snelling), in Michigan Territory. For two years Marsh taught school and studied medicine under the guidance of Edward Purcell, the post surgeon. Purcell died without giving his apprentice a certificate, but this did not prevent Marsh from successfully practicing medicine years later in California....

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Ordronaux, John (03 August 1830–20 January 1908), medico-legalist, was born in New York City, the son of John Ordronaux, a businessman, and Elizabeth Charreton. The elder John Ordronaux, a native of France, had commanded an American privateer during the War of 1812 and remained after the war in the United States, where he acquired and operated a sugar refinery. On his father’s death in 1841, eleven-year-old John was adopted by John Moulton of Roslyn, New York, who assumed the rest of his upbringing....

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Pattison, Granville Sharp (23 January 1791–12 November 1851), anatomist and surgeon, was born in Glasgow, Scotland, the son of John Pattison of Kelvingrove, a well-to-do merchant, and Hope Margaret Moncrieff. He lived with his family in a luxurious Robert Adam mansion, but in 1806 his father was forced to sell the property. He attended the University of Glasgow from 1806 to 1812 but did not graduate. In 1809 he served at the private College Street Medical School, Glasgow, as assistant to the well-known anatomist Allan Burns, whom he succeeded as the lecturer in anatomy and surgery in 1813. Later that year he was admitted to the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow....

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Redmond, Sidney Dillon (11 October 1871–11 February 1948), physician, attorney, and political leader, was born in Holmes County, Mississippi, near the town of Ebenezer, the son of Charles Redmond, a former slave and blacksmith, and Esther Redmond, a former slave. In 1871 large numbers of blacks were elected to state and local government positions. Less than two years earlier a new state constitution had been put into effect that promised to make democracy a reality for both black and white Mississippians. Moreover, abolition of slavery in the United States had occurred six years before Redmond’s birth. After leaving the farm near Ebenezer along with the rest of his family, Redmond settled in Holly Springs, Mississippi, where he later attended Rust College. Upon graduation from Rust College in 1894, he entered the field of education and served both as a principal at Mississippi State Normal School in Holly Springs and as a mathematics instructor at Rust College....

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Sheppard, Sam (29 December 1923–06 April 1970), osteopath and murder suspect, was born Samuel Holmes Sheppard in Cleveland, Ohio, to Richard Allen Sheppard, an osteopath, and his wife, Ethel Niles Sheppard. Young Sam's father had founded a flourishing osteopathic clinic in Cleveland, and the family, which included two other sons, enjoyed a prosperous, upper-middle-class life. After graduating in 1942 from Cleveland Heights High School, where he was a popular athlete and a good student, Sam Sheppard enrolled at the Los Angeles College of Osteopathic Physicians and Surgeons to prepare for a career as an osteopath. In February 1945, while still a student there, he married Florence Marilyn Reese, known as Marilyn, a high school classmate and longtime girlfriend then in her senior year at Skidmore College. The couple lived in Los Angeles for several years while Sheppard completed his medical studies, and during that time their only child, Samuel Reese Sheppard, was born....

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Tarnower, Herman (18 March 1910–10 March 1980), physician, was born in New York City and grew up in Brooklyn, New York. He was one of four children of immigrant parents from Poland. His father was a seller of hats. He attended high school in New York City and, after college, obtained an M.D. from Syracuse University in 1933, at twenty-three years of age. Interested in internal medicine, he did his internship and residency in that specialty at New York City’s Bellevue Hospital. Following his years at Bellevue he worked overseas, his travels supported by a fellowship from the New York Academy of Medicine....