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Loudon, Samuel (1727?–24 February 1813), printer and entrepreneur, was born probably in Scotland. He emigrated to New York in or before 1753, when he established a general store opposite the Old Slip Market. During the next decade and a half, he expanded his business and personal interests. On 24 January 1756 he married Sarah Oakes. By 1757 he had enlarged his trade to sell nautical goods. By 1768 Sarah had died, and Loudon had married his second wife, Lydia Griswold. He had a total of eight children. In the late 1760s and early 1770s he speculated in upper New York land with ...

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Scherman, Harry (01 February 1887–12 November 1969), publisher, was born in Montreal, Canada, the son of Jacob Scherman, a laborer, and Katharine Harris, both of whom were Jewish. In 1889 the family moved to Philadelphia. In 1893 the father deserted his family and returned to his native England. Living in poverty in a boardinghouse with his hard-working mother, Scherman attended Central High School in Philadelphia, where fellow classmates included ...

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Schuster, Max Lincoln (02 March 1897–20 December 1970), publisher, was born Max Schuster in Kalusz, Austria, the son of Barnet Schuster and Minnie Stieglitz, both of whom were American citizens. The family returned to the United States when Max was seven weeks old. The Schusters lived in New York City and ran a stationery and cigar store in Harlem. They later moved to the Washington Heights neighborhood of upper Manhattan, where Max attended public school. In high school he became so interested in ...

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Stratemeyer, Edward (04 October 1862–10 May 1930), writer, creator of popular juvenile series, and founder of the Stratemeyer Syndicate, was born in Elizabeth, New Jersey, the son of German immigrants Henry Julius Stratemeyer, a tobacconist, and Anna Siegal. The youngest of six children, Stratemeyer worked in his brother’s tobacco store after completing high school. Even as an adolescent, Stratemeyer experimented with writing and distributing stories; a 31-page pamphlet, “The Tale of a Lumberman (as Told by Himself),” from 1878 is the earliest example of his amateur printing efforts. Five years later he published an amateur—and short-lived—boy’s story paper, ...