1-20 of 57 results  for:

  • prose fiction x
Clear all

Article

Ardrey, Robert (16 October 1908–14 January 1980), anthropologist, playwright, and novelist, was born and raised in Chicago, Illinois, the son of Robert Lesley Ardrey, an editor and publisher, and Marie Haswell. Ardrey earned a Ph.D. in the natural and social sciences from the University of Chicago in 1930. After taking a writing course taught by ...

Image

Sholem Asch. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-112710).

Article

Asch, Sholem (01 November 1880–10 July 1957), Yiddish novelist, dramatist, and short story writer, was born in Kutno, Poland, a small town near Warsaw, the son of Moishe Asch, a cattle dealer and innkeeper, and Malka Wydawski. Asch was raised in a small town and was essentially self-educated. His father taught him the alphabet from the Bible, which was, as Asch later noted, “the first book that I ever held in my hand” (Siegel, p. 3). The Bible served as his grammar, geography, and history textbooks, as well as a storybook of sorts; later the Scriptures became a source of continual literary inspiration. As an adult Asch became a serious collector of rare biblical editions. He attended local schools to train for the rabbinate, studying the Talmud but also reading German classics and Shakespeare. Finally, against his family’s wishes, Asch made up his mind to become a writer....

Article

Biggers, Earl Derr (26 August 1884–05 April 1933), novelist, short-story writer, and playwright, was born in Warren, Ohio, the son of Robert J. Biggers and Emma E. Derr, occupations unknown. He was a colorful student at Harvard, where he loudly voiced his preference for ...

Article

Bird, Robert Montgomery (05 February 1806–23 January 1854), writer, was born in New Castle, Delaware, the son of John Bird, a merchant, and Elizabeth Van Leuvenigh, whose ancestors were among the early settlers of Delaware. Following the death of his father in 1810, Bird lived first with an uncle ( ...

Article

Bolton, Guy Reginald (23 November 1884–05 September 1979), writer, was born in England, the son of American parents Reginald Pelham Bolton and Katherine Behenna. Bolton’s father was a consulting engineer, which may have helped to determine Bolton’s initial decision to become an architect. After studying at the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn and the Atelier Masquerey in France, he designed some houses in Manhattan, worked at West Point, and helped design the Soldier’s and Sailor’s Monument on Riverside Drive. He married four times: to Julie Alexander Currie in 1910 (two children), Marguerite Namara in 1917 (one child), Marion Redford in 1927 (one child), and Virginia de Lanty in 1939. He became an American citizen in 1956....

Article

Brown, William Hill (late Nov.? 1765–02 September 1793), writer, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the son of Gawen Brown, an English-born clockmaker of repute, and his third wife, Elizabeth Hill Adams. He attended a Boston boys’ school and assisted in his father’s shop during vacation periods. In his lifetime Brown’s writings appeared under various initials or names such as “Pollio” or “Columbus.” His work reveals a broad acquaintance with classical and British literature and a keen awareness of contemporary American writers. His first published poems were witty treatments of political topics. “Shays to Shattuck: An Epistle” ( ...

Article

Cannon, Charles James (04 November 1800–09 November 1860), author, was born in New York City, the son of an Irish Catholic couple whose names are unknown. A sickly child who received scanty education, Cannon soon began a lengthy career as a customhouse clerk. In his spare time, he wrote tales, novels, poetry, and plays. Having “never known the advantages of education” and having composed his works “in the intervals of labour or disease,” as he noted in the preface to his ...

Article

Cohen, Octavus Roy (26 June 1891–06 January 1959), fiction writer, playwright, and screenwriter, was born in Charleston, South Carolina, the son of Octavus Cohen, a lawyer and editor, and Rebecca Ottolengui. He graduated from the Porter Military Academy, Charleston, in 1908, worked as a civil engineer for a Tennessee railroad company from 1909 to 1910, earned his B.S. in engineering at Clemson College in 1911, and worked for newspapers in Alabama, South Carolina, and New Jersey from 1910 to 1912. He returned to Charleston to study law in his father’s office, passed the bar in 1913, and practiced law for two years. He married Inez Lopez in 1914. The couple lived in Birmingham, Alabama, and had one son. Upon selling his first short story in 1915, Cohen determined to become a full-time professional writer. The Cohens moved to New York in 1935 and to Los Angeles in 1948. Inez Cohen died in 1953....

Article

Collens, Thomas Wharton (23 June 1812–03 November 1879), Creole jurist and writer, was born in New Orleans, Louisiana, the son of John Wharton Collens and Marie Louise de Tabiteau. Collens’s father was descended from an English officer who had settled in Louisiana in the eighteenth century. His mother was a member of one of the city’s French-speaking, Creole families. Raised in a bilingual, Catholic household of modest means, Collens overcame a limited education during an apprenticeship in the print shop to which he was sent as a youth. By the age of twenty-one he had advanced to the position of associate editor of the ...

Article

Cook, George Cram (07 October 1873–14 January 1924), writer and leading spirit of the Provincetown Players theatrical group, was born in Davenport, Iowa, the son of Edward Everett Cook, a railroad attorney from a prominent local family, and Ellen Katherine Dodge. Fellow students at a private school gave him his lifelong nickname of “Jig.” Cook grew up artistic and idealistic in his views. He desired deeply to recapture in modern life the community, simplicity, and depth he found in ancient Greek civilization and drama. In appearance he was a romantic figure: ...

Article

Daggett, Rollin Mallory (22 February 1831–12 November 1901), journalist, congressman, minister to Hawaii, and author, was born in Richville, New York, the son of Eunice White and Gardner Daggett, farmers. Daggett was the youngest of seven children, the other six being girls. After his mother’s death in 1833, the family moved to Defiance, Ohio, in 1837. In 1849 Daggett became a printer, learning a trade which endowed him with an education and influenced his later choice of a journalistic career....

Article

Djerassi, Carl (29 Oct. 1923–30 Jan. 2015), organic chemist, novelist, and playwright, was born in Vienna, Austria, the only child of the Samuel Djerassi (Bulgarian) and Alice Friedmann (Austrian), both assimilated Jews. Samuel was a physician who specialized in the treatment of venereal diseases, calling himself a dermatologist to protect his wealthy clients’ reputations. Alice was a dentist and physician. Djerassi lived in Sofia, Bulgaria until he was five and then moved to Vienna with his mother following his parents’ divorce. He went to the same Viennese school formerly attended by Sigmund Freud. Every summer Djerassi returned to his father in Bulgaria....

Image

Lion Feuchtwanger Photograph by Arnold Genthe; reproduced from a damaged negative, 1932. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-G412- 6089-012 P&P).

Article

Feuchtwanger, Lion (07 July 1884–21 December 1958), author, was born in Munich, Germany, the son of Sigmund Feuchtwanger, owner of a margarine factory, and Johanna Bodenheimer. After graduating from the Wilhelms-Gymnasium in Munich, supplemented by private instruction in Hebrew and Jewish religion, Feuchtwanger attended the universities of Munich and Berlin, majoring in German philology and history. He obtained his Ph.D. in Munich in 1907, writing a dissertation on Heinrich Heine’s unfinished historical novel, ...

Article

Flavin, Martin Archer (02 November 1883–27 December 1967), writer and businessman, was born in San Francisco, California, the son of Martin J. Flavin, a merchant, and Louise Archer. At the age of four he saw a production of Romeo and Juliet, which “made an indelible impression” (...

Article

Hawkes, John (17 August 1925–15 May 1998), fiction writer and dramatist, was born John Cendennin Burne Hawkes, Jr., in Stamford, Connecticut, the son of John Clendennin Burne Hawkes, a businessman and prospector, and Helen Ziefle Hawkes. From 1935 through 1940 the Hawkes family lived in Juneau, Alaska, where the father sought to recover business losses from the Great Depression in the prospecting industry. After graduating from high school in Pawling, New York (1943), Hawkes began college at Harvard University but left to serve as an ambulance driver for the American Field Service in Germany and Italy during 1944 and 1945 (an experience informing his first novel, ...

Image

Ben Hecht Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-114614).

Article

Jeffrey Brown Martin

Hecht, Ben (28 February 1894–18 April 1964), writer, was born on New York City’s Lower East Side, the son of Joseph Hecht, a tailor and designer of women’s dresses, and Sarah Swernofsky. Hecht attended schools in New York and later in Racine, Wisconsin, where the family moved when he was six. In 1910 he moved to Chicago and began working as a picture stealer (purloining victims’ pictures from family homes for use in the newspaper) and factotum for the ...

Article

Heggen, Thomas (23 December 1919–19 May 1949), author and playwright, was born Orlo Thomas Heggen in Fort Dodge, Iowa, the son of Thomas O. Heggen, the operator of a mortgage and loan company, and Mina Amelia Paulson. When the depression forced his father’s company out of business in 1935, Heggen moved with his family to Oklahoma City, where he graduated from Classen High School the following year. Heggen attended Oklahoma City University, Oklahoma A & M University, and the University of Minnesota, from which he received a degree in journalism in 1941. Heggen, a slightly built young man with a sardonic wit, wrote for the student newspaper at all three universities....