1-20 of 27 results  for:

  • poet (general) x
Clear all

Article

Brown, William Hill (late Nov.? 1765–02 September 1793), writer, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the son of Gawen Brown, an English-born clockmaker of repute, and his third wife, Elizabeth Hill Adams. He attended a Boston boys’ school and assisted in his father’s shop during vacation periods. In his lifetime Brown’s writings appeared under various initials or names such as “Pollio” or “Columbus.” His work reveals a broad acquaintance with classical and British literature and a keen awareness of contemporary American writers. His first published poems were witty treatments of political topics. “Shays to Shattuck: An Epistle” ( ...

Image

Witter Bynner Photograph by Arnold Genthe, 1916. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-G432-1362).

Article

Bynner, Witter (10 August 1881–01 June 1968), poet and playwright, was born in Brooklyn, New York, the son of Thomas Edgarton Bynner and Annie Louise Brewer. His parents separated when he was seven as a consequence of his father’s alcoholism, and he and his younger brother lived for three years with his mother and her family in Norwich, Connecticut. After his father’s death in 1891, the family moved to Brookline, Massachusetts, to live with his father’s sisters....

Article

Cannon, Charles James (04 November 1800–09 November 1860), author, was born in New York City, the son of an Irish Catholic couple whose names are unknown. A sickly child who received scanty education, Cannon soon began a lengthy career as a customhouse clerk. In his spare time, he wrote tales, novels, poetry, and plays. Having “never known the advantages of education” and having composed his works “in the intervals of labour or disease,” as he noted in the preface to his ...

Article

Clarke, Joseph Ignatius Constantine (31 July 1846–27 February 1925), journalist, poet, and playwright, was born in Kingstown, near Dublin, Ireland, the son of William Clarke, a barrister, and Ellen Quinn. After the 1858 death of his father, Joseph Clarke moved with his family to London, where he began work as an apprentice in the reading room of the Queen’s Printers. In addition to the education he received as a boy in a series of Irish Catholic Schools, Clarke was privately tutored in French and Latin. He secured a civil service sinecure when he was sixteen....

Image

Countée Cullen Photograph by Carl Van Vechten, 1941. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-42529).

Article

Cullen, Countée (30 May 1903?–09 January 1946), poet and playwright, was the son of Elizabeth Thomas Lucas. The name of his father is not known. The place of his birth has been variously cited as Louisville, Kentucky, New York City, and Baltimore, Maryland. Although in later years Cullen claimed to have been born in New York City, it probably was Louisville, which he consistently named as his birthplace in his youth and which he wrote on his registration form for New York University. His mother died in Louisville in 1940....

Article

Daggett, Rollin Mallory (22 February 1831–12 November 1901), journalist, congressman, minister to Hawaii, and author, was born in Richville, New York, the son of Eunice White and Gardner Daggett, farmers. Daggett was the youngest of seven children, the other six being girls. After his mother’s death in 1833, the family moved to Defiance, Ohio, in 1837. In 1849 Daggett became a printer, learning a trade which endowed him with an education and influenced his later choice of a journalistic career....

Article

Godfrey, Thomas (04 December 1736–03 August 1763), poet and playwright, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of Thomas Godfrey, a glazier, and his wife, whose name is unknown. The senior Godfrey was a member of Benjamin Franklin’s Junto and one of the inventors of the navigator’s quadrant, but at his death in 1749 his son was apprenticed to a watchmaker. However, with his gift for verse, he soon attracted the notice of ...

Article

Heyward, DuBose (31 August 1885–16 June 1940), novelist, dramatist, and poet, was born Edwin DuBose Heyward in Charleston, South Carolina, the son of Edwin Watkins Heyward, a mill hand from an old and distinguished southern family ruined after the Civil War, and Jane Screven DuBose, also descended from once-prosperous plantation owners. His father died when Heyward was two, and his mother was reduced to taking in sewing to support the family. He attended a private school until he was nine and entered public school in the fourth grade but was, as he later described himself, “a miserable student,” uninterested in schoolwork. He dropped out in his first year of high school, at the age of fourteen, to work as a clerk in a hardware store and later worked among African-American stevedores as a checker for a steamship company. Often sick as a child, he got polio when he was eighteen; two years later he contracted typhoid fever and the next year pleurisy. At twenty-one, Heyward and his friend Henry T. O’Neill organized a real estate and insurance company. A skilled salesman of great personal charm, he succeeded in making himself financially independent....

Article

Lawson, James (09 November 1799–24 March 1880), editor, author, and insurance broker, was born in Glasgow, Scotland, the son of James Lawson, a merchant. His mother’s identity is not known. Lawson entered the University of Glasgow at the age of thirteen but presumably did not graduate because he left Scotland in 1815. Settling in New York, he worked as an accountant in the firm of Alexander Thomson & Co., which was owned by and named for his maternal uncle. Lawson became a member of the firm in 1822 and remained there until 1826, when the company failed. This turned out to be a rather opportune event; Lawson had been sending submissions of his writing to his long-time friend James G. Brooks, one of the founders of the weekly ...

Article

Leonard, William Ellery (25 January 1876–02 May 1944), philologist, poet, and dramatist, was born in Plainfield, New Jersey, the son of the Reverend William James Leonard and Martha Whitcomb. Named after the famous Unitarian minister William Ellery Channing (1780–1842), he dropped Channing by the time he reached college. Reverend Leonard, himself a native of Plainfield, had been a Baptist minister in Chicago but suddenly resigned his pastorate when he could no longer accept the religious beliefs of his congregation. At the time of Ellery’s birth he was editor of the ...

Image

Percy MacKaye Photograph by Arnold Genthe Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-G432-0438).

Article

MacKaye, Percy (16 March 1875–31 August 1956), poet and playwright, was born Percy Wallace MacKaye in New York City, the son of James Morrison Steele MacKaye, an actor-dramatist, and Mary Keith Medbery, a writer. MacKaye was schooled chiefly at home and in public schools in New York City, though he also attended Lawrence Academy in Groton, Massachusetts, for a short time....

Image

Archibald MacLeish. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-92742).

Article

MacLeish, Archibald (07 May 1892–20 April 1982), poet and playwright, was born in Glencoe, Illinois, the son of Andrew MacLeish, a prosperous dry-goods merchant, and Martha Hillard MacLeish, a college professor. Andrew MacLeish was a reserved, stern father whose lack of attention to his son may have generated Archibald’s fierce drive to succeed. The influence of Martha MacLeish, who worked to develop her four children’s sense of social responsibility, helps account for Archibald’s intense involvement in American public life as well as his concern for those in personal or political trouble....

Article

Markoe, Peter (1752?–30 January 1792), poet and playwright, was born on St. Croix, Danish West Indies (now the Virgin Islands), the son of Abraham Markoe, a sugar plantation owner, and Elizabeth Kenny Rogers. Educated at Pembroke College, Oxford, and the Inns of Court in London, Markoe helped manage the family holdings on St. Croix but lived in Philadelphia after his father settled there around 1770. Peter Markoe apparently never married. Both Markoe and his father, while still Danish citizens, were officers in the Philadelphia City Cavalry, the “Light Horse,” in the mid 1770s....

Article

Marqués, René (04 October 1919–22 March 1979), playwright, poet, and author, was born in Arecibo, Puerto Rico, the son of Juan Marqués Santiago and Pura Isabel Abreu, independent farmers. Marqués spent his childhood in a rural setting that was showing rapid changes toward modernity. Efficient mechanical devices were replacing traditional farming methods, and as a result, the island experienced two migrational patterns. As fewer men were needed for farmwork, families abandoned the countryside and sought opportunities in San Juan, the capital of the island, or they went to New York City. These radical changes became important motifs in Marqués’s work, specifically in his transitional rural settings and in his strong ideological discourse....

Image

Cornelius Mathews. Daguerreotype from the studio of Mathew B. Brady. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZC4-4157).

Article

Mathews, Cornelius (28 October 1817?–25 March 1889), author and editor, was born in Port Chester, New York, the son of Abijah Mathews, a cabinetmaker, and Catherine Van Cott. Little is known about Mathews’s childhood. No diaries, letters, or articles exist before the mid-1830s. However, according to Trows New York Directory, his family moved from Westchester County to Manhattan, and Mathews resided for the rest of his life in various locations in lower Manhattan. He attended Columbia University from 1830 to 1832. In 1833 he transferred to the College of the City of New York, now known as New York University. The Reverend James Mathews, a relative of the family, was the chancellor of the newly established college. Cornelius Mathews received his A.B. degree in the first graduating class of 1834, and, at the commencement ceremony held at the Middle Dutch Church of New York, he gave a speech titled “Females of the American Revolution.” Mathews was admitted to the bar in 1837 and practiced law for a short time. He became the first president of the university’s alumni association in 1846. For a Eucleian Society meeting he presented his speech “Americanism—What Is It?” (1845), later published in the ...