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Driscoll, Paddy (11 January 1895–29 June 1968), professional athlete and coach, was born John Leo Driscoll in Evanston, Illinois, the son of Timothy Driscoll, a mason for the Milwaukee Railroad, and Elizabeth Mahoney. Of small stature, the 5′ 11″, 150-pound Driscoll began his formal football career relatively late, as a junior at Evanston High School. In 1914 Driscoll matriculated at Northwestern University in his hometown, where he starred as a halfback and team captain. Northwestern nearly won the league championship in 1916, as Driscoll led the Wildcats and was named to the All–Western Conference team....

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Guyon, Joseph Napoleon (26 August 1892–27 November 1971), professional football and baseball player, was born in Mahnomen, Minnesota, the son of Charles M. Guyon and Mary (maiden name unknown). A full-blooded Chippewa Indian, Guyon was born O-Gee-Chidea, which means “brave man” in the Chippewa language. He grew up on the White Earth Reservation in Minnesota, where he received an elementary education. He entered Carlisle Indian School in Pennsylvania in 1912 on an athletic scholarship....

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Haughton, Percy Duncan (11 July 1876–27 October 1924), college football coach and baseball executive, was born on Staten Island, New York, the son of Malcolm Graeme Haughton and Mary Nesbit Lawrence. Haughton grew up in Brookline, Massachusetts, and attended Groton School, where he captained the football team and played baseball. Entering Harvard University in 1895, he continued to play baseball, serving as team captain his senior year. He also played varsity football for three years, as tackle and fullback. Recognized as one of the great punters in football history, Haughton after his junior year was accorded second-team All-America status by ...

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Neale, Alfred Earle (05 November 1891–02 November 1973), college and professional athlete and coach, was born in Parkersburg, West Virginia, the son of William Henry Neale, a wholesale produce operator, and Irene T. Fairfax. Called “Greasy” as a retort by a childhood friend whom Neale had called “Dirty,” the nickname stuck, and Neale enjoyed its use by all who knew him throughout his life. At the age of ten Neale went to work setting pins in a bowling alley and selling newspapers. After the eighth grade he left school and took a job with the Parkersburg Iron & Steel Co. He resumed his education in high school two years later and became a star in football, even coaching the team during his sophomore year. During the summers he played on neighborhood and then semiprofessional baseball teams; he was offered his first professional contract in the summer of 1912. He played briefly with Altoona, Pennsylvania, in the Tri-State League and then with two Ontario clubs in the Canadian League before enrolling at West Virginia Wesleyan in the fall of that year. There he became a three-sport athlete, starring as an end in football and helping his team defeat rival West Virginia University in 1912 and 1913. In college Neale met two people who would play important roles in his life: John Kellison, a football teammate who became his closest long-term friend and who served as his assistant coach on five different football teams, and Genevieve Horner, a coed at Wesleyan whom he married during the summer of 1915. They had no children....