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Salmon P. Chase. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-B8172-1747).

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Chase, Salmon Portland (13 January 1808–07 May 1873), statesman, antislavery leader, and chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, was born in Cornish, New Hampshire, the son of Ithamar Chase, a glassmaker and tavernkeeper, and Janette Ralston. When Chase was nine years old, his father died. To ease the financial burden on his mother, Chase, the eighth of eleven children, moved to Ohio and lived with his uncle ...

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Joshua Reed Giddings. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-61335).

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Giddings, Joshua Reed (06 October 1795–27 May 1864), antislavery congressman, was born in Bradford County, Pennsylvania, the son of Joshua Giddings and Elizabeth Pease, farmers. At the age of ten he moved with his parents to Ashtabula County in Ohio’s Western Reserve, where he lived for the rest of his life. In 1819 he married Laura Waters, with whom he had seven children, two of whom died in infancy. Lacking virtually all formal education, Giddings nonetheless studied law with Elisha Whittlesey, later a U.S. representative, and established a successful practice. After losing his considerable investments in western lands in the panic of 1837 and becoming estranged from his former law partner, future U.S. Senator ...

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Lovejoy, Owen (06 January 1811–25 March 1864), congressman and Congregational minister, was born in Albion, Maine, the son of Rev. Daniel Lovejoy, a Presbyterian minister, and Elizabeth Pattee. One of eight children of highly religious parents, Lovejoy entered Bowdoin College in 1830 but left in 1833 following the death of his father. He taught school to support himself in college and studied law. In 1836, having already become a convert to abolitionism, apparently influenced by ...