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Buckalew, Charles Rollin (28 December 1821–19 May 1899), senator, was born at Fishing Creek, Columbia County, Pennsylvania, the son of John McKinney Buckalew and Martha Funston, farmers. Buckalew was educated at Hartford Academy, Hartford, Pennsylvania, then taught school and clerked in a grocery store for a few years before beginning a systematic study of law with a local attorney. He was admitted to the bar at the age of twenty-two and after two years’ experience entered the Bloomsburg district prosecuting attorney’s office for Columbia County, where he practiced until 1847. In 1849 he married Permelia S. Wadsworth, with whom he had two children. At the age of twenty-nine, he was elected as a Democrat to the state senate, where he served from 1850 to 1858. In 1854 he was appointed one of the commissioners sent to negotiate a treaty with Paraguay. He became chairman of the state Democratic committee in 1857 and was elected again a state senator....

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Burnet, Jacob (22 February 1770–10 May 1853), Ohio lawmaker and U.S. senator, was born in Newark, New Jersey, the son of William Burnet, a doctor and farmer, and Mary Camp. His father was the son of Scottish Presbyterian immigrants and served in the Continental Congress and as surgeon general in the Continental army. Jacob Burnet graduated from Nassau Hall in September 1791, studied law, and gained admittance to the New Jersey bar in spring 1796. He promptly moved to Cincinnati in the Northwest Territory, where he married Rebecca Wallace, daughter of a former pastor of the Presbyterian church, in 1800. They had seven children....

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Hatfield, Mark Odom (12 July 1922–07 August 2011), governor of Oregon and U.S. senator, was born in Dallas, Oregon, the only child of Charles Dolen Hatfield, a blacksmith for the Southern Pacific Railroad, and Dovie E. Odom Hatfield. Hatfield’s mother obtained a teaching degree in the early 1930s, and the family moved to Salem, Oregon, where she taught middle school. Hatfield graduated from Salem High School in 1940 and enrolled in nearby Willamette University. After the Pearl Harbor bombing in December 1941, he accelerated his studies and graduated in three years from Willamette, after which he joined the U.S. Navy and spent 1943–1945 in the Pacific. He took part in the Battles of Iwo Jima and Okinawa and was with one of the first American contingents to enter Hiroshima after the dropping of the atomic bomb. That experience would profoundly shape his attitude toward war, and in his subsequent political career he would devote a great deal of energy to opposing American involvement in all future wars....

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Lacock, Abner (09 July 1770–12 April 1837), state and national leader and canal builder, was born on Cub Run, near Alexandria, Virginia, the son of William Lacock and Lovey (maiden name unknown), farmers. Around 1780 his family settled in Washington County in western Pennsylvania; there they bought a 120-acre farm in Amwell Township, and Abner helped his parents in planting and in harvesting crops. Between 1782 and 1786 Lacock attended Thaddeus Dodd’s Academy in Amity, Pennsylvania, and studied mathematics, surveying, and the classics. In 1788 he married Hannah Eddy, and the couple had three sons and four daughters....

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Neuberger, Richard Lewis (26 December 1912–09 March 1960), journalist and politician, was born in Portland, Oregon, the son of Isaac Neuberger, a restaurant owner, and Ruth Lewis. He grew up in relatively comfortable circumstances within the small Jewish community in Portland and attended local schools, graduating from Lincoln High School in 1930. While covering sports for the school newspaper, he met Lair H. Gregory, sports editor for the ...

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Penrose, Boies (01 November 1860–31 December 1921), political leader and U.S. senator, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of Richard Alexander Fullerton Penrose, a prominent physician, and Sarah Hannah Boies. The eldest of seven sons from a distinguished family, Boies Penrose grew up in the privileged world of patrician Philadelphia. In 1877 he entered Harvard along with his younger brother Charles Bingham Penrose. They both graduated in 1881, Boies finishing second in his class, just behind Charles, with a degree in political economy....

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Joe T. Robinson Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-107884).

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Robinson, Joseph Taylor (26 August 1872–14 July 1937), general assemblyman, congressman, governor of Arkansas, and senator, was born on a farm near Lonoke, Arkansas, the son of James Madison Robinson, a physician and Baptist minister, and Matilda Jane Swaim. With almost no formal schooling, Robinson passed the Arkansas teacher’s examination in 1889 and began teaching in rural schools near Lonoke. He later attended the Industrial University of Arkansas (now the University of Arkansas) at Fayetteville for two years, returned to Lonoke, and studied law with Judge Thomas C. Trimble. He attended the University of Virginia School of Law and received his law degree in 1895. By 1897 he had formed a law practice with Judge Trimble. In 1896 he married Ewilda Gertrude Miller; they had no children....

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Van Winkle, Peter Godwin (07 September 1808–15 April 1872), lawyer, businessman, and politician, was born in New York City, the son of Peter Van Winkle, a merchant, and Phoebe Godwin. Van Winkle attended local elementary and secondary schools. One of his interests was writing poems, which were published in several literary journals. In 1831 he married Juliette Rathbun of Paramus, New Jersey; they had six children, three of whom died in infancy. Van Winkle remained a widower after his wife’s death in 1844....