1-17 of 17 results  for:

  • US government (federal) x
  • US representative x
  • confederate legislator or governor x
Clear all

Article

Ashe, Thomas Samuel (19 July 1812–04 February 1887), jurist and congressman, was born at “the Hawfields,” Orange County, North Carolina, the home of his maternal grandfather, where his parents regularly spent the summer. He was the son of Pasquale Paoli Ashe, the owner of a plantation in coastal New Hanover County, North Carolina, and a coal mine in Alabama, and Elizabeth Jane Strudwick. His father lost his entire fortune about 1829 as surety for the debts of a friend....

Article

Barksdale, Ethelbert (04 January 1824–17 February 1893), editor and U.S. and Confederate congressman, was born in Smyrna, Rutherford County, Tennessee, the son of William Barksdale and Nancy Lester. Ethelbert Barksdale was the younger brother of William Barksdale (1821–1863), commanding general of the Mississippi brigade in the Army of Northern Virginia, who was killed at the battle of Gettysburg. Ethelbert Barksdale moved to Mississippi while still in his teens and soon followed his brother William into journalism and Democratic politics. He married Alice Harris in 1843. Whether they had any children is unknown....

Article

Barnwell, Robert Woodward (10 August 1801–25 November 1882), educator, congressman, and U.S. and Confederate senator, was born at Beaufort, South Carolina, the son of Robert Gibbes Barnwell, a prosperous planter and Federalist member of Congress, and Elizabeth Wigg Hayne. In 1817 he entered Harvard College, where he became friendly with ...

Article

Brown, Albert Gallatin (31 May 1813–12 June 1880), U.S. and Confederate congressman, was born in Chester District, South Carolina, the son of Joseph Brown. (His mother’s identity is unknown.) The second son of a struggling, ambitious farmer, Brown moved with his family in 1820 from South Carolina to Copiah County, Mississippi. In this raw frontier setting his father acquired land and slaves. After attending Mississippi College and Jefferson College from 1829 to 1832, Brown wanted to attend Princeton or Yale, but when his father refused to pay the costs, he turned to law and politics. He won his first elective office in 1832 as a colonel of militia. He was admitted to the Mississippi bar in 1833 and had just started his law practice in the now extinct town of Gallatin when he was elected a brigadier general in the militia. Soon after his marriage in 1835 to Elizabeth Frances Taliaferro, he entered the Mississippi legislature as a Democratic representative. He began a remarkable record of holding elective office virtually without interruption for the next thirty years....

Article

Gartrell, Lucius Jeremiah (07 January 1821–07 April 1891), soldier and U.S. and Confederate congressman, was born in Wilkes County, Georgia, the son of Joseph Gartrell, Jr., a planter and merchant, and Eliza Boswell. After attending the state university and Randolph-Macon College in Ashland, Virginia, Gartrell read law in the Washington, Georgia, office of another future Confederate commander, ...

Article

Gilmer, John Adams (04 November 1805–14 May 1868), state senator and U.S. and Confederate congressman, was born in Guilford County, North Carolina, the son of Robert Gilmer, a farmer and wheelwright, and Anne Forbes. Both parents were of Scotch-Irish descent; their families had come from Ireland to North Carolina via Pennsylvania. His father and both grandfathers fought against the British in the American Revolution. John Adams Gilmer’s name reflected his father’s Federalist political predilections. Young Gilmer worked on the family farm and attended a local subscription school a few months during the winter. When he was nineteen, he enrolled in the Reverend Eli W. Caruther’s school in Greensboro, where he excelled in classical languages and mathematics. For three years afterward (1826–1829), he taught school in Laurel County, South Carolina, to pay debts resulting from his education. In 1829 he returned to Greensboro to study law in the office of Archibald D. Murphey. In 1832 he married Juliana Paisley; they had six children, five of whom survived childhood. One son, John Alexander Gilmer, became a Confederate lieutenant colonel and superior court judge. Also in 1832 Gilmer was admitted to the bar, and he gradually built a lucrative practice. He was listed in the 1860 census as an agriculturalist and lawyer who owned fifty-three slaves and property valued at $112,000....

Image

Robert M. T. Hunter, early 1860s. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-B8172-1740).

Article

Hunter, Robert M. T. (21 April 1809–18 July 1887), congressman and statesman, was born Robert Mercer Taliaferro Hunter at “Mount Pleasant,” his father's estate in Essex County, Virginia, the son of James Hunter, a planter, and Maria Garnett Hunter. Born into a family that had achieved local prominence, he grew up in comfortable surroundings. After receiving his early education through home tutoring, he entered the University of Virginia and graduated in July 1828. Interested in government and history, he decided to become a lawyer and studied under Judge ...

Article

Johnson, Robert Ward (22 July 1814–26 July 1879), Arkansas political leader and member of both the U.S. Congress and the Confederate Congress, was born in Scott County, Kentucky, the son of Benjamin Johnson and Matilda Williams. Young Johnson was named for his paternal grandfather, who headed a powerful political family in Kentucky. Two of his uncles won election to the U.S. House of Representatives, while another, ...

Article

Maxwell, Augustus Emmet (21 September 1820–05 May 1903), jurist and legislator, was born in Elberton, Georgia, the son of Simeon Maxwell, a planter, and Elizabeth Fortson. When he was two years old, the family moved to Green County, Alabama. After attending country schools, in 1836 Maxwell began study at the University of Virginia; he left school briefly because of vision problems but he graduated from the university in 1841....

Article

Miles, William Porcher (04 July 1822–11 May 1899), U.S. and Confederate congressman, was born in Walterboro, Colleton District, South Carolina, the son of James Saunders Miles, a planter, and Sarah Bond Warley. Neither academics nor politics interested Porcher (pronounced Poor-shay) Miles as a young man, though he graduated from the College of Charleston in 1842 with honors. For a year after college Miles read law, but he abandoned that profession when the College of Charleston appointed him professor of mathematics in 1843. He stayed at the school for twelve years and in time cultivated such friends as ...

Image

William Ballard Preston. Daguerreotype from the studio of Mathew B. Brady. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-110164).

Article

Preston, William Ballard (29 November 1805–16 November 1862), U.S. congressman and Confederate senator, was born at Smithfield plantation in Montgomery County, Virginia, the son of James Patton Preston, a prominent planter and Virginia governor, and Ann Barraud Taylor. Preston graduated from Hampden-Sydney College in 1824 and then studied law briefly, at the University of Virginia in 1825 and for a year with his cousin ...

Article

Reagan, John Henninger (08 October 1818–06 March 1905), U.S. congressman, U.S. senator, and postmaster general of the Confederacy, was born in Sevierville, Tennessee, the son of Timothy Richard Reagan and Elizabeth Lusk, farmers. His early life was not unlike that of many young men in early nineteenth-century frontier America, hunting, fishing, and helping with farm chores. However, in 1834, Reagan decided to follow his own ambitions. After a year of “hiring out” to a local planter, he attended Boyd’s Creek Academy for fifteen months. When funds ran low, he worked so that in 1837 he could study for a year at Southwestern Seminary in Maryville....

Article

Seddon, James Alexander (13 July 1815–19 August 1880), congressman and Confederate secretary of war, was born in Fredericksburg, Stafford County, Virginia, the son of Thomas Seddon, a banker and merchant, and Susan Pearson. Spending much of his youth with an uncle, Seddon attended local academies and received private tutoring. His family’s large library enabled him to pursue his interest in reading. He managed his father’s properties in Virginia and studied law under Arthur A. Morison, a relative and local attorney. In 1834 Seddon spent nearly six months in Mississippi and Louisiana, where the climate helped his frail health. Thereafter he periodically returned to spend several winters in Louisiana, tending to his investments in sugar....

Image

William Lowndes Yancey. Salted paper print, c. 1858. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution.

Article

Yancey, William Lowndes (10 August 1814–27 July 1863), U.S. congressman, secessionist, and Confederate senator, was born at the shoals of the Ogeechee River, on the boundary between Warren and Hancock counties, Georgia, the son of Benjamin Cudworth Yancey, an attorney and South Carolina state legislator, and Caroline Bird. Benjamin Yancey died in 1817, and in 1821 Caroline married ...