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McGranery, James Patrick (08 July 1895–23 December 1962), congressman, federal judge, and U.S. attorney general, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of Irish immigrants Patrick McGranery and Bridget Gallagher. McGranery attended Catholic parochial schools in Philadelphia, but he left before completing his secondary education to work as an electrotyper for the Curtis Publishing Co. While there, he became a member of the city’s electrotypers union and carried the union card most of his life. In 1917 he joined the U.S. Army and served in the First World War as a balloon observation pilot and later as an adjutant of the 111th Infantry. After being demobilized in 1919, he returned to Philadelphia and school. He received a law degree from Temple University Law School in 1928 and was subsequently admitted to the Pennsylvania bar. His clientele included police and the firemen’s union....

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William Henry Moody, c. 1906–1910. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-107092).

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Moody, William Henry (23 December 1853–02 July 1917), cabinet officer, member of Congress, and justice of the Supreme Court, was born in Newbury, Massachusetts, the son of Henry Lord Moody and Melissa Emerson, farmers. Moody graduated from Phillips Academy, Andover, Massachusetts, in 1872 and received an A.B. from Harvard in 1876. He studied at the Harvard Law School for four months and then left to read law in the office of ...

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A. Mitchell Palmer Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-111660).

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Palmer, A. Mitchell (04 May 1872–11 May 1936), attorney general and congressman, was born Alexander Mitchell Palmer in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, the son of Samuel Bernard Palmer, a lumberyard owner and bridge builder, and Caroline Albert. A Quaker, Palmer attended Swarthmore College, graduating in 1891, first in his class and class president. In college he evidenced the prejudice against immigrants then common among white native-born Protestants. Certain judicial reforms, he declared, would “insure justice … to the lowest foreigner who comes to our free land as well as to the highborn American through whose veins course the blood of the Pilgrim fathers.”...