1-4 of 4 results  for:

  • psychologist x
Clear all

Article

Campbell, Angus (10 August 1910–15 December 1980), psychologist and educator, was born Albert Angus Campbell in Leiters, Indiana, the son of Albert Alexis Campbell, a public school superintendent, and Orpha Brumbaugh. He grew up in Portland, Oregon, and received a B.A. in 1931 and an M.A. in 1932 in psychology at the University of Oregon. In 1936 he completed his doctoral training as an experimental psychologist at Stanford University, where he trained under psychologists Ernest R. Hilgard and ...

Article

Cantril, Hadley (16 June 1906–28 May 1969), psychologist and public opinion researcher, was born Albert Hadley Cantril in Hyrum, Utah, the son of Albert Hadley Cantril, a physician, and Edna Mary Meyer. He grew up in Douglas, Wyoming, and graduated from Dartmouth College in 1928. He then spent two years studying in Berlin and Munich. After receiving his Ph.D. in psychology from Harvard in 1931, he served for one year as instructor of sociology at Dartmouth. In 1932 he married Mavis Katherine Lyman; they had two children. In the fall after his marriage he returned to Harvard as instructor in psychology. He then moved to Teachers College, Columbia University, in 1935, the year that he coauthored his first book, ...

Article

Coe, George Albert (26 March 1862–09 November 1951), psychologist of religion, religious educator, and political activist, was born in Mendon, New York, the son of the Reverend George W. Coe, a Methodist minister, and Harriet Van Voorhis. He completed the A.B. at the University of Rochester in 1884 and then enrolled in the Boston University School of Theology, where he received the S.T.B. in 1887 and the A.M. in philosophy and world religions in 1888. In 1891, after a year of study at the University of Berlin, he completed a Ph.D. at the Boston University School of All Sciences....

Article

Hartmann, George Wilfred (29 March 1904–11 June 1955), psychologist and pacifist, was born in Union Hill, New Jersey, the son of Herman Carl Hartmann, a roofer and tinsmith, and Veronica Ruff. As a scholarship student at Columbia University (A.B. 1924), Hartmann excelled in German (his major), history, and psychology. Shifting to psychology for its greater opportunities and social utility, he combined graduate study at Columbia (A.M. 1925; Ph.D. 1928) with instructorships there and at Dartmouth College. As a student he met his wife, Esther Leah Norton; they had two children. From 1928 to 1935 he served as a professor of psychology at Pennsylvania State College. In 1935 he returned to New York as a postdoctoral fellow and then became a professor of educational psychology at Teachers College (1936–1949)....