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Taylor, Graham (02 May 1851–26 September 1938), minister, educator, and settlement house director, was born in Schenectady, New York, the son of Rev. William James Romeyn Taylor, a minister, and Katharine Cowenhoven. Following his mother’s death in 1852, his father married Katharine’s sister, Maria Cowenhoven, who raised the four Taylor sons. Three of them followed the paternal family tradition of service in the Dutch Reformed church. Graham graduated from Rutgers College in 1870 and the Theological Seminary of the Reformed Church in America at New Brunswick, New Jersey, in 1873. That same year he was ordained and married to Leah Demarest, the daughter of seminary professor David Demarest. The Taylors had four children, two of whom shared their father’s urban reform interests, Lea Demarest Taylor and Graham Romeyn Taylor....

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Ward, Harry Frederick (15 October 1873–09 December 1966), religious educator and social critic, was born in Brentford, Middlesex, England, the son of Harry Ward, Sr., a grocery merchant, and Florence Jeffrey. Both of Ward’s parents were Free Methodists, members of one of Methodism’s early perfectionist sects, and from his boyhood Ward was sensitive to the contrast between it and the crusty, high church formalism of the Methodist Episcopal church. Parishioners of the Methodist chapel at Chiswick (adjoining Brentford) reported that Ward was a “preacher in the Wesleyan connection” who “assisted the work in the mission band” and also served as a “deputy class leader.” Ward’s incipient social Christianity continued after he arrived in Utah in 1891 and joined his uncle in trying to lure complacent parishioners out of the pews and into the streets to minister to the poor....

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Wood, Thomas Bond (17 March 1844–18 December 1922), Methodist missionary, educator, and social reformer, was born in Lafayette, Indiana, the son of Aaron Wood, a Methodist minister, and Maria Hitt. He entered Indiana Asbury (later DePauw University) and then Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut, receiving an A.B. from both institutions. He earned an M.A. from both universities (Indiana Asbury, 1866; Wesleyan, 1867). During this time he taught German and natural science at Wesleyan Academy in Wilbraham, Massachusetts (1864–1867). The New England Conference of the Methodist Episcopal church licensed him to preach in 1865 and ordained him deacon (1867) and elder (1868). He married Ellen Dow in 1867; they had at least four children. He transferred to the North-West Indiana Conference, the conference of his father, where he served as president of Valparaiso College (1867–1869) before his appointment as a missionary to Argentina....