1-2 of 2 results  for:

  • Manufacture and trade x
  • Christian: Catholic - laity x
Clear all

Article

Meade, George (27 February 1741–09 November 1808), merchant and Roman Catholic layman, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of Robert Meade, a merchant, and Mary Stretch. The father was born in county Limerick, Ireland, lived in Philadelphia from about 1732, and had commercial interests in St. Croix and Barbados. George Meade was privately educated by his maternal uncle, George Stretch, in Barbados and was resident there in 1754 when his father died in St. Croix. By 1761 he entered into a business partnership with his elder brother in Philadelphia. The firm of Garrett and George Meade imported rum, sugar, and slaves, usually small groups of girls and boys, from Barbados and other West Indian ports. Enslaved Africans were employed as skilled and unskilled laborers by local farmers, artisans, merchants, and urban householders. Both Garrett and George Meade signed the Non-Importation Agreement of 1765 in opposition to the Stamp Act. Since the firm was not engaged in trade with Great Britain, nonimportation had little or no impact on their business, while opposition to the stamp tax was politically popular....

Article

Rudd, Daniel (07 August 1854–04 December 1933), newspaper editor and Catholic lay leader, was born in Bardstown, Kentucky, the son of Robert Rudd, a slave on the Rudd estate, and Elizabeth “Eliza” Hayden, a slave of the Hayden family in Bardstown. He was baptized a Catholic when an infant. Although little information exists about his early life, it may be conjectured that his Catholic upbringing was due chiefly to his mother who acted as sexton in the local church for more than sixty years. After the Civil War, he went to Springfield, Ohio, where an older brother had already established himself, to get a secondary school education. There is little information about Rudd until 1884 when he began a black newspaper, the ...