1-11 of 11 results  for:

  • army officer (US civil war - Confederate) x
Clear all

Article

Bate, William Brimage (07 October 1826–09 March 1905), Confederate general, governor, and U.S. senator, was born in Bledsoe’s Lick (now Castalian Springs), Sumner County, Tennessee, the son of James Henry Bate and Amanda Weathered, planters. William Bate received the rudiments of education at a local school, later named the Rural Academy, which he attended until age sixteen. At that time, 1842, his father died, and Bate took a job as a clerk on the steamboat ...

Article

Butler, Matthew Calbraith (08 March 1836–14 April 1909), Confederate general and U.S. senator, was born in Greenville, South Carolina, the son of William Butler (1790–1850), a U.S. naval surgeon, and Jane Tweedy Perry. The eleventh of sixteen children, Butler spent his early youth in the South Carolina upcountry and attended Greenville Academy. In 1848 he accompanied his father, who had been appointed an agent to the Cherokee Indians, to Fort Gibson in the Indian Territory. His father died in 1850, and in 1851 Butler returned to South Carolina, settling in Edgefield, where he lived with U.S. senator ...

Article

Cockrell, Francis Marion (01 October 1834–13 December 1915), Confederate general and U.S. senator, was born in Johnson County, Missouri, the son of Joseph Cockrell, a sheriff, and Nancy Ellis. He attended local schools and then Chapel Hill College in adjoining Lafayette County, from which he graduated in 1853. That same year he married Arethusa Dorcas Stapp. He taught at the college the following year while studying law. Admitted to the bar in October 1855, Cockrell returned to Johnson County to establish his practice in Warrensburg. He had inherited considerable land holdings from his father and, by special act of the Missouri legislature in 1852, had been granted his legal majority to manage these. His wife died in 1859, leaving him with two small children. He actively participated in Democratic politics and in 1860 received appointment to the Board of Curators of the University of Missouri....

Article

Daniel, John Warwick (05 September 1842–29 June 1910), Confederate soldier, legal scholar, and U.S. senator, was born in Lynchburg, Virginia, the son of William Daniel, Jr., a lawyer and judge, and Sarah Ann Warwick. He attended private schools in the Lynchburg area; after attending Lynchburg College from 1855 to 1859, he enrolled in a classical school administered by Dr. Gessner Harrison. When Virginia seceded from the Union in 1861, Daniel interrupted his education to enlist in the cavalry. He rose to major and fought in several battles, including Gettysburg. At the battle of the Wilderness in 1864 he received a wound that put him on crutches for the remainder of his life and earned him the sobriquet of the “Lame Lion of Lynchburg.”...

Article

Hampton, Wade (28 March 1818–11 April 1902), Confederate general, governor of South Carolina, and U.S. senator, was born in Charleston, South Carolina, the son of Wade Hampton II and Ann FitzSimons. Named after his father, an immensely wealthy South Carolina planter, Hampton was raised at “Millwood,” the family estate on the Congaree River near Columbia. Privately tutored in his youth, he graduated from South Carolina College in 1836. He married Margaret Preston in 1838, and the couple settled at “Sand Hills,” Hampton’s estate on the outskirts of Columbia. They had four children before Margaret’s death in 1855. In 1858 Hampton married Mary McDuffie, daughter of Senator ...

Article

Hunton, Eppa (22 September 1822–11 October 1908), soldier and U.S. congressman and senator, was born in Fauquier County, Virginia, the son of Eppa Hunton, brigade inspector of the Virginia militia, and Elizabeth Marye Brent. Educated at a private academy, he taught school, read law, and was admitted to the Virginia bar in 1843. Moving to Brentsville in Prince William County, he pursued his profession and joined the militia. By 1847 he was a general officer of state troops. The following year he married Lucy Carolina Weir; they had one son....

Article

Mahone, William (01 December 1826–08 October 1895), soldier, railroad executive, and politician, was born in Monroe, Virginia, the son of Fielding Mahone, a merchant, and Martha Drew. After studies at Littletown Academy, William entered the Virginia Military Institute in 1844. He graduated in 1847 and afterward taught at the Rappahannock Academy. At the end of the 1848–1849 academic year, he was appointed surveyor of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad. He remained in this post until 1852, when he was appointed chief engineer of the Fredericksburg and Valley Plank Road. He left that company one year later to accept the post of chief engineer of the Norfolk and Petersburg Railroad; in April 1860 he was elected president of the company. In 1855 he married Otelia Butler. Only three of the couple’s thirteen children reached maturity....

Article

Ransom, Matt Whitaker (08 October 1826–08 October 1904), U.S. senator, soldier, and diplomat, was born in Warren County, North Carolina, the son of Robert Ransom and Priscilla Whitaker, planters. In 1847 Ransom graduated from the University of North Carolina, where he had read law. Admitted to the bar the same year, he established what became a thriving practice in Warrenton, North Carolina. In 1852 the state legislature named him the state’s attorney general, a post from which he resigned three years later. In 1853 Ransom married Martha Anne Exum and thereafter resided on a plantation she owned in Northampton County. The couple would have eight children. Prior to emancipation, their holdings included more than eighty slaves....

Article

Toombs, Robert Augustus (02 July 1810–15 December 1885), U.S. senator, Confederate cabinet member, and Confederate general, was born near Washington in Wilkes County, Georgia, the son of Robert Toombs, a successful planter who had served in the American Revolution, and Catharine Huling. In 1824 “Bob” Toombs entered Franklin College in Athens (now the University of Georgia) but in January 1828 was dismissed by the faculty for unspecified reasons after various incidents. He enrolled at Union College, Schenectady, New York, graduating that summer, and spent a year at the University of Virginia Law School, where he tied for bottom place in his class of fourteen. Despite his lack of academic distinction, his social connections enabled Toombs to establish himself quickly. In 1829 the Georgia legislature passed a bill allowing him to practice law while still a minor. In 1830 he married Julia Ann DuBose, the daughter of a wealthy planter and sister of his half-brother Lawrence’s wife. They had three children, two of whom survived infancy. The couple were lavish hosts in the nation’s capital and at home, and Toombs enjoyed all the luxuries of one of the elite of the Old South....

Image

Edward Cary Walthall. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-93460).

Article

Walthall, Edward Cary (04 April 1831–21 April 1898), Confederate general and U.S. senator, was born in Richmond, Virginia, the son of Barrett White Walthall, a merchant, and Sally Wilkinson. When Barrett White Walthall went bankrupt in 1841, he moved his family, including ten-year-old Edward, to Holly Springs, Mississippi. The young Walthall received a traditional education at St. Thomas Hall, an Episcopal church school in Holly Springs. From his experience on the debate team, he decided to enter the law. After reading law with his brother-in-law, George R. Freedman, in Pontotoc, Mississippi, and being admitted to the bar of Mississippi in 1852 at age twenty-one, Walthall served briefly as the deputy clerk to the circuit court in Holly Springs. He then moved to Coffeeville, Mississippi, in the north central part of the state, where he entered private practice. In 1856 the people of the Tenth Judicial District of Mississippi elected Walthall district attorney. Also in 1856 he married Sophie Bridges, who died within the year. Walthall repeated this pattern of election and marriage three years later, when in 1859 the people of the Tenth District again elected him district attorney and he married his second wife, Mary Lecky Jones. Neither marriage resulted in children, although Walthall adopted the daughter of his second wife....