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Albee, Ernest (08 August 1865–26 May 1927), philosopher and educator, was born in Langdon, New Hampshire, the son of Solon Albee and Ellen Lucillia Eames. He graduated from the University of Vermont in 1887 with a bachelor’s degree. He then went to Clark University in Massachusetts, where he studied psychology. In 1892 he transferred to Cornell University, where he earned a doctorate in philosophy in 1894. He had already been made a fellow of the Sage School of Philosophy at Cornell, and in 1892 he was appointed to the faculty. Appointed a full professor in 1907, he remained at Cornell for the rest of his career. He married Emily Humphreys Manly in 1911....

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Berkson, Isaac Baer (23 December 1881–10 March 1975), educational philosopher, was born Isadore Berkson in Brooklyn, New York, the son of Henry Berkson, a merchant, and Jennie Berkman. He attended the City College of New York (1908–1912), where he received a B.A. in liberal arts, Greek, and Latin; and Columbia University and Teachers College (1912–1919), where he earned a master of arts in history of philosophy and sociology of education and a Ph.D. in philosophy and education. In 1919 he married Libbie Suchoff; the couple had three children....

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Blanshard, Brand (27 August 1892–19 November 1987), rationalist philosopher and educator, was born Percy Brand Blanshard with a fraternal twin, Paul, in Fredericksburg, Ohio, the son of Francis George Blanshard, a Congregationalist minister, and Emily Coulter. In a tragic accident Emily Blanshard was burned to death when the twins were infants. Brand’s father served for a few years as a minister of a Congregationalist church. Suffering from consumption, the young minister, on advice from his physician, went to live in a dry western state. Unfortunately, the move was to no avail and he died a short time later....

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Blau, Joseph Leon (06 May 1909–28 December 1986), philosopher and educator, was born in Brooklyn, New York, the son of Joel Leon Blau, a rabbi, and Rachel Woolf. He received his B.A. (1931), M.A. (1933), and Ph.D. degrees (1944) from Columbia University. His dissertation was titled “The Christian Interpretation of the Cabala in the Renaissance.” It substantiated the Jewish influence on Christianity during this period. Among those who exerted a special influence on Blau were ...

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Bode, Boyd Henry (04 October 1873–29 March 1953), professor of philosophy and philosophy of education, was born in Ridott, Illinois, the son of Henry (Hendrik) Bode, a farmer and minister of the First Christian Reformed church, and Gertrude Weinenga. Bode’s family, although Dutch, was part of a religious migration of Germans to the United States in 1848. They settled first in Holland, Michigan, and then moved to northern Illinois, where Boyd was born as Boyo Hendrik Bode. In the late 1870s the family purchased farm land and moved to Iowa. Bode was the eldest son in a family of eight children and the only one allowed to pursue an education (as was customary so that he could follow his father into the ministry). His primary and secondary schooling consisted of Christian schools and Calvinist doctrine; however, the family permitted him to attend William Penn College (affiliated with the Friends) in Oskaloosa, Iowa, where he received an A.B. in 1896. Bode took a second A.B. at the University of Michigan in 1897 and then went on to study European philosophy at Cornell University, where he completed his Ph.D. in 1900 with a dissertation titled the “Principle of Gratia Gratum in the Ethics of Saint Thomas Aquinas.” In 1903 Bode married Bernice Ballard; they had two children....

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Brameld, Theodore Burghard Hurt (20 January 1904–18 October 1987), professor of philosophy and philosophy of education, was born in Neillsville, Wisconsin, the son of Theodore E. Brameld, a real estate agent, and Minnie Dangers, a crafts teacher. Brameld was graduated in 1922 from Neillsville High School and attended Ripon College, from which he was graduated in 1926. He then held an administrative position at the college and in 1928 enrolled at the University of Chicago to study philosophy. He received a Ph.D. in 1931, having studied the works of ...

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Cohen, Morris Raphael (25 July 1880?–28 January 1947), philosopher and educator, was born in Minsk, Russia, the son of Abraham Mordecai Cohen, a handyman and tailor, and Bessie Farfel, a seamstress. He lived his first twelve years in the traditional society and culture of a Jewish shtetl in imperial Russia. His father and elder brothers resided in the United States during most of these years, while Cohen was reared in impoverished circumstances by his mother and maternal grandfather. Mother and son joined the rest of the family in New York City in 1892. When obliged to indicate his date of birth, Cohen chose 25 July because it was the approximate date of his arrival in his new country. His parents were unable to specify even the year of his birth, but agreed upon 1880 in order to justify Cohen’s bar mitzvah in 1893, which was to take place at the end of his thirteenth year....

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Creighton, James Edwin (08 April 1861–08 October 1924), philosopher and educator, was born in Pictou, Nova Scotia, Canada, the son of John Creighton and Mary O’Brien. Creighton attended Dalhousie College in Halifax, Nova Scotia, graduating with an A.B. in 1887. At Dalhousie, Creighton studied with ...

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John Dewey. Drypoint on paper, 1932, by Bernard Sanders. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution.

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Dewey, John (20 October 1859–01 June 1952), philosopher and educator, was born in Burlington, Vermont, the son of Archibald Sprague Dewey, a shopkeeper, and Lucina Artemisia Rich. Dewey’s childhood and adolescence were influenced by his mother’s strict Calvinism, his father’s taste for British literature, and his contact with family friends on the faculty at the University of Vermont. His enrollment at the university in 1875 exposed him to Darwinian evolutionary theory and the speculative and social philosophy taught by Henry A. P. Torrey. Outside the classroom Dewey became an avid reader of progressive periodicals whose contributors espoused versions of evolution, positivism, and agnosticism. Undecided about a profession after his graduation in 1879, he taught high school on an interim basis and with the help of a relative secured a position in Oil City, Pennsylvania. In 1881 he left Oil City to teach in a small school near Burlington so that he could continue to study philosophy with Torrey....

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Ducasse, Curt John (07 July 1881–03 September 1969), philosopher and educator, was born in Angoulême, France, the son of Jean Louis Ducasse and Clementine Theoda Grolig. He was educated at the Bordeaux Lycée and the Abbotsholme School in England. Leaving Abbotsholme at the age of eighteen, he returned to France briefly in 1899 and then held a series of jobs that imparted quite a different sort of education. He was a cashier in a dry goods store in Mexico City, sold sheet music in town and country, opened a dress shop on Fifth Avenue featuring Mexican lace, was a stenographer in the foreign department of an insurance company in Manhattan, and was secretary to the chief engineer in the Seattle office of a railroad....

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Herman J. Saatkamp and Clay Davis Splawn

Edman, Irwin (28 November 1896–04 September 1954), writer, philosopher, and teacher, was born in New York City, the son of Solomon Edman, a shirt manufacturer, and Ricka Sklower. Edman attended Columbia College, graduating in 1917 and receiving his Ph.D. in philosophy three years later. His dissertation, ...

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Feibleman, James Kern (13 July 1904–14 September 1987), philosopher and educator, was born in New Orleans, Louisiana, the son of Leopold Feibleman, the managing proprietor of a department store, and Nora Kern. Prominent in the Jewish community, the family was active in business, philanthropic, and cultural affairs....

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Firth, Roderick (30 January 1917–22 December 1987), philosopher and educator, was born in Orange, New Jersey, the son of Leo Earl Firth, who was in the advertising business, and Ida Lake. Firth attended primary and secondary schools in New Jersey and spent summers boarding at Mountain Farm in Cobbleskill, New York. In 1934 he graduated from Newark Academy and in the same year entered Haverford College....

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Fite, Warner (05 March 1867–23 June 1955), educator and philosopher, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of George Fite, a fire insurance salesman, and Sallie Gibbs Liddle. Fite attended Haverford College and received his A.B. in 1889. After a year at the Philadelphia Divinity School (Episcopal), he entered the Ph.D. program in philosophy at the University of Pennsylvania. As part of his studies, he studied abroad at the University of Berlin from 1891 to 1892 and at the University of Munich from 1892 to 1893. After his return to the United States, he received his Ph.D. in 1894. That fall he began his teaching career as an instructor in philosophy at Williams College in Massachusetts. While there, Fite also served as dean of faculty from 1895 to 1897. He then moved to Chicago, where he taught in the psychology department at the University of Chicago from 1897 to 1903. During his tenure there, he wrote ...

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Gordy, John Pancoast (21 December 1851–31 December 1908), historian, philosopher, and teacher, was born in Salisbury, Maryland, the son of Elijah Melson Pancoast and Martha Ellen Shepard. Gordy began teaching in public schools in 1868 at the age of seventeen and was named principal of an academy in Farmington, Delaware, in 1871; later, between 1873 and 1875, he served as vice principal of another academy, this one located in Dover, Maryland. Following his graduation in 1878 from Wesleyan University of Pennsylvania, where he had studied logic, psychology, and ethics and specialized in English literature, Gordy began his graduate studies in Europe, receiving his Ph.D. from the University of Leipzig in 1884. After his return to the United States he served as professor of philosophy and pedagogy at Ohio University (1886–1896), professor of history and philosophy at Ohio State University (1896–1900), and professor of the history of education and American history at New York University (1901 until his death). In 1884 he married Eugenia Day, with whom he had one daughter....

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Gros, John Daniel (1737–25 May 1812), clergyman, college professor, and philosopher, was born in the Bavarian Palatinate at Webenheim, near the city of Zweibrücken, Germany, the son of Lorenz Gros and Anna Magdalena. Little is known of Gros’s upbringing and early education. His name is sometimes spelled Gross. Gros entered the University of Marburg in 1758 and then matriculated at the University of Heidelberg in 1761, partaking in theological studies. Having intentions of entering the pastoral ministry of the German Reformed church, Gros journeyed to America, landing in Philadelphia in 1764. As the North American population continued to increase, a growing need for pastors existed. Gros’s esteemed German education and some influential connections led the German Reformed Coetus of Pennsylvania to ordain him in 1765. The coetus enacted the ordination without first receiving ratification from the Dutch Church Synod in Holland, which was the mandated procedure at that time. This was a precedent-setting act, as the German Reformed denomination in America began to break free from the church authorities in Europe....

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Harris, William Torrey (10 September 1835–05 November 1909), philosopher and educator, was born in North Killingly, Connecticut, the son of William Harris and Zilpah Torrey, farmers. Recognized for his intellectual ability at a young age, Harris attended several preparatory schools prior to entering Yale College in 1854. After only two years of study Harris left Yale and moved to St. Louis in the summer of 1857 to seek an income in teaching shorthand. Even in his youth Harris made strong impressions on acquaintances, not only through his intellectual ability but through his force of character and ability to lead. “Harris was a zealous missionary by nature, as well as a born teacher” (Snider, p. 10)....

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John Grier Hibben [left to right] Charles Evans Hughes, John Grier Hibben, and John W. Davis, at Princeton, 1924. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-102283 ).

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Hibben, John Grier (19 April 1861–16 May 1933), philosopher, educator, and president of Princeton University, was born in Peoria, Illinois, the son of the Reverend Samuel Hibben and Elizabeth Grier. Born in the first year of the Civil War, Hibben was a year old when his father, a volunteer chaplain, died in a Union army camp. Brought up alone by a mother who worked hard to educate her only child, he graduated in 1882 from Princeton University as both valedictorian and class president. He studied at the University of Berlin for a year and then at the Princeton Theological Seminary; he was ordained in 1887. In that same year, he married Jenny Davidson of Elizabeth, New Jersey; they had one daughter. They moved to Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, where he served the congregation of Falling Spring Presbyterian Church as minister....