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Barnard, Henry (24 January 1811–05 July 1900), educator and editor, was born in Hartford, Connecticut, the son of Chauncey Barnard, a sea captain and farmer, and Betsey Andrews. Barnard spent his formative years in Connecticut and graduated from Yale in 1830. Immediately after college he taught school in Pennsylvania for a year and loathed it. He then read law and was admitted to the Connecticut bar in 1834; however, he never practiced. During the winter of 1832–1833 he spent three months in Washington, D.C., where he met many of the leading political figures of the day, and then traveled in the South. Still lacking direction, he embarked on a grand tour of Europe in March 1835; the impetus for the trip was his selection as one of the Connecticut delegates to the London international peace congress. While in England he was introduced to a number of the foremost Whig intellectuals, politicians, and reformers; at the time he seemed to be primarily interested in the cause of prison reform. After touring England he spent six months on the Continent before returning home to attend his ailing father....

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Lord, Asa Dearborn (17 June 1816–07 March 1875), teacher, education reformer, and editor, was born in Madrid, New York, the son of Asa Lord, occupation unknown, and Lucretia Dearborn, a teacher. Unlike many men of his era, Lord received formal education in several areas. His early education was provided by his mother. He then attended the local district school and an academy, probably the St. Lawrence Academy in Potsdam, New York. In 1837, while teaching in Willoughby, Ohio, Lord returned to his studies at Western Reserve College in Hudson, Ohio. In 1838 he entered Oberlin as a sophomore and stayed for one year. Lord resumed his teaching duties at Willoughby, remaining in that position until 1839. He later studied medicine there, receiving a medical diploma in 1846. He also studied theology privately and was licensed to preach by the Presbytery of Franklin, Ohio. He married Elizabeth W. Russell in 1842; they had no children. She served as an assistant dean at Oberlin and worked with her husband in his many positions....

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McAndrew, William (20 August 1863–28 June 1937), educator and editor, was born in Ypsilanti, Michigan, the son of William McAndrew, a furniture manufacturer, and Helen Walker, an obstetrician and the first female physician in the state of Michigan. His parents, both Scottish immigrants, were active in local reform causes, supporting forums where they hosted such activists as ...