1-20 of 27 results  for:

  • activist (general) x
  • Results with images only x
Clear all

Article

Ames, Fisher (09 April 1758–04 July 1808), Federalist party leader, member of Congress, essayist, and renowned orator, was born in Dedham, Massachusetts, the son of Nathaniel Ames, Sr., a physician, tavern keeper, and almanac writer, and Deborah Fisher. Intellectually honed, Ames was admitted to Harvard at twelve. Steeped in the classics, he excelled in elocution and participated in a debating club, the Institute of 1770. Graduating in 1774, he served with the Dedham militia at the time of the battle of Bunker Hill but did not see combat. At home he pursued his scholarly interests, reading widely in classical literature and history. He also occasionally taught school. Under the tutelage of the prominent ...

Article

Berger, Victor Louis (28 February 1860–07 August 1929), a founder and leader of the Socialist Party of America and a U.S. congressman, was born in the Nieder-Rehbach region of the Austro-Hungarian Empire (now Romania) to Ignatz Berger and his wife, Julia (maiden name unknown), innkeepers. Berger attended the Universities of Vienna and Budapest for two years. His family suffered economic reversals and in 1878 emigrated to Bridgeport, Connecticut. In 1881 Berger settled in Milwaukee, where he taught school. In the heavily Germanic city he emerged as a leader, initially through the ...

Article

Berrigan, Philip (05 October 1923–06 December 2002), political activist, was born Philip Francis Berrigan in Two Harbors, Minnesota, the youngest of six sons of Thomas W. Berrigan, a railroad engineer and union organizer who espoused radical politics, and Frida Fromhart Berrigan. Frida Berrigan, an immigrant from Germany, saw to it that her children were raised as strict Catholics; her husband, a second‐generation Irish Catholic, was less observant, preferring to write poetry rather than attend church. When Philip was a child his father was fired from the railroad, allegedly because of his politics. The family resettled on a small farm near Syracuse, New York, where Thomas Berrigan found work at a power plant and organized a local branch of the Electrical Workers Union....

Article

Cass, Lewis (09 October 1782–17 June 1866), political leader and presidential candidate, was born in Exeter, New Hampshire, the oldest child of Jonathan Cass, a skilled craftsman, revolutionary war veteran, soldier, and landowner, and Mary Gilman, daughter of a wealthy merchant. Both parents’ families had emigrated to New England in the seventeenth century. Cass was educated at Phillips Exeter Academy between 1792 and 1799, briefly taught school in Delaware, and then moved to Marietta in the Ohio territory, where his family had gone while his father served in the army on the frontier. Cass studied law in a local law office and established a practice in Zanesville, Ohio, where he married Elizabeth Spencer, a doctor’s daughter, in 1806. The family grew to include four daughters and one son....

Article

Cummings, Homer Stillé (30 April 1870–10 September 1956), attorney, Democratic party leader, and attorney general of the United States, was born in Chicago, Illinois, the son of Uriah C. Cummings, a businessman, and Audie Schuyler Stillé. Educated at the Heathcote School in upstate New York, the Sheffield School of Engineering of Yale University, and the Yale Law School, from which he graduated in 1893, Cummings opened a legal practice in Stamford, Connecticut, soon thereafter and formed a partnership with Charles D. Lockwood that lasted until he joined the ...

Article

Dorr, Thomas Wilson (05 November 1805–27 December 1854), political and social reformer, was born in Providence, Rhode Island, the son of Sullivan Dorr, a wealthy merchant and business leader, and Lydia Allen, a prominent socialite and sister of noted inventor Zechariah Allen and Rhode Island governor and U.S. senator ...

Article

Du Bois, W. E. B. (23 February 1868–27 August 1963), African-American activist, historian, and sociologist, was born William Edward Burghardt Du Bois in Great Barrington, Massachusetts, the son of Mary Silvina Burghardt, a domestic worker, and Alfred Du Bois, a barber and itinerant laborer. In later life Du Bois made a close study of his family origins, weaving them rhetorically and conceptually—if not always accurately—into almost everything he wrote. Born in Haiti and descended from Bahamian mulatto slaves, Alfred Du Bois enlisted during the Civil War as a private in a New York regiment of the Union army but appears to have deserted shortly afterward. He also deserted the family less than two years after his son’s birth, leaving him to be reared by his mother and the extended Burghardt kin. Long resident in New England, the Burghardts descended from a freedman of Dutch slave origin who had fought briefly in the American Revolution. Under the care of his mother and her relatives, young Will Du Bois spent his entire childhood in that small western Massachusetts town, where probably fewer than two-score of the 4,000 inhabitants were African American. He received a classical, college preparatory education in Great Barrington’s racially integrated high school, from whence, in June 1884, he became the first African-American graduate. A precocious youth, Du Bois not only excelled in his high school studies but contributed numerous articles to two regional newspapers, the Springfield ...

Article

Edge, Walter Evans (20 November 1873–29 October 1956), New Jersey businessman and political leader, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of William Edge, a railroad manager, and Mary Elizabeth Evans. In 1877 his family moved to Pleasantville, New Jersey, and in 1887 he took a job as a printer’s devil for the ...

Article

Farley, James Aloysius (30 May 1888–09 June 1976), chairman of the Democratic National Committee and postmaster general of the United States in the first two administrations of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, chairman of the Democratic National Committee and postmaster general of the United States in the first two administrations of ...

Article

Fletcher, Henry Prather (10 April 1873–10 July 1959), diplomat and Republican party leader, was born in Greencastle, Pennsylvania, the son of Lewis Henry Clay Fletcher, a bank cashier, and Martha Ellen Rowe. Fletcher’s mother died prematurely in 1882, leaving his father to raise eight children alone. Two years later his father accepted an auditor’s position with the Cumberland Railroad, and the family moved to Chambersburg, Pennsylvania. After graduating from a nearby private academy, Fletcher served as district court reporter and read law with his uncle, D. Watson Rowe. He passed the bar examination in 1894 and subsequently formed a law partnership with his uncle and became active in the local Republican party. Later, Fletcher would perceive his lack of a college education as a personal shortcoming, despite receiving honorary law degrees from several institutions....

Article

Gwathmey, Robert (03 January 1903–21 September 1988), artist and activist, was born near Richmond, Virginia, an eighth-generation native of Welsh descent, to Robert Gwathmey, a railroad engineer, and Eva Harrison Gwathmey. Following brief stints at North Carolina State College (1922–1923) and Maryland Institute of Design (1925–1926) and at sea on a commercial freighter, he attended the prestigious Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (PAFA, 1926–1930), where he was awarded several prize fellowships and met his future wife, also an aspiring artist, Rosalie Hook of Charlotte, North Carolina. They married in 1935 and had one son, Charles Gwathmey, who became one of the most prominent architects of his generation. When Charles was born, Rosalie Gwathmey took up photography, acquired professional skills, and later earned public recognition for her work. Beginning in the 1940s Robert Gwathmey often asked Rosalie to photograph rural scenes in their native South and used those images as the basis for some of his most striking paintings. Despite that collaboration Gwathmey was typical of his generation in regarding photography as an inferior art form....

Article

Herndon, Angelo Braxton (06 May 1913–09 December 1997), Communist Party activist and labor organizer, was born in Wyoming, Ohio, the fifth of seven children of Paul Herndon, a coal miner, and Harriet Herndon. The family was impoverished after the death of his father when Angelo was nine years old. The maid work that Harriet did after Paul's death was not sufficient to keep everyone fed, so Angelo and his older brother Leo left home to work in coal mines in Lexington, Kentucky, and in Birmingham, Alabama. It was in Birmingham that Angelo became a Communist. Like many blacks, he was inspired by the Communist Party's emphasis on interracial organizing and its public stance against Jim Crow and its accompanying violence. While in Birmingham, he organized protests for the Scottsboro Boys case, in which nine black teenage boys were falsely accused of raping two white women on a railroad boxcar in Alabama in 1931....

Article

Kennedy, Edward Moore (Ted) (22 February 1932–25 August 2009), U.S. senator and advocate for liberal reform, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the ninth and last child of Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy and Joseph Patrick Kennedy, Sr., a banker, investor, and American ambassador to Great Britain. His dynasty-building father held high expectations for his children and established trust funds that would provide them with the financial security and freedom to pursue public service. As the baby brother, Kennedy spent his childhood catching up with his siblings in a highly competitive, politically oriented Irish Catholic family that turned everything into a contest, whether it was sailing, playing touch football, or getting attention at the dinner table. Kennedy later attributed his habit of copious research and preparation for legislation as a senator to the standards his father set for table talk....

Article

Lorimer, William (27 April 1861–13 September 1934), Illinois Republican party boss, was born in Manchester, England, the son of William Lorimer, Sr., a Scotch Presbyterian minister, and Sarah Harley. He immigrated with his family to the United States in 1865, moving to the West Side of Chicago in 1870. Lorimer’s father died soon after their arrival in Chicago, and from the ages of ten to twenty-one, Lorimer held a variety of jobs, including paperboy, stockyards laborer, and streetcar conductor. In 1884 he married Susan K. Mooney, an Irish Catholic, and he converted to Roman Catholicism in 1914. They had eight children. He was a devoted family man and did not drink, smoke, or attend the theater....

Article

Lovett, Robert Morss (25 December 1870–08 February 1956), educator, writer, and reformer, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the son of Augustus Sidney Lovett, an insurance broker, and Elizabeth Russell. Lovett grew up in the Roxbury section of Boston and then went to Harvard, where he graduated at the head of his class with an A.B. in English in 1892....

Article

Marcantonio, Vito Anthony (10 December 1902–09 August 1954), radical political figure and congressman, was born in East Harlem, New York City, the son of Sanario “Samuel” Marcantonio, an American-born carpenter, and Angelina deDobitis, a native of Italy. Though his father’s skills allowed a relatively comfortable existence, Marcantonio imbibed radical politics at DeWitt Clinton High School from his history teacher, a one-time Socialist candidate for Congress and teachers’ union organizer. Marcantonio organized a neighborhood rent strike while still a teenager and in 1921 was introduced to a kindred spirit, the president of the city’s board of aldermen, ...

Article

Mas Canosa, Jorge (21 September 1939–23 November 1997), political activist and entrepreneur, was born in Santiago, Cuba, the son of Ramón Mas Cayado, a Cuban army veterinarian, and Josefa de Carmen Canosa Aguilera. While still in high school in Santiago, Mas Canosa was active in politics and spoke out against the president of Cuba, Fulgencio Batista, on the local radio, for which, at the age of fourteen, he was arrested and spent a few months in jail. His father sent him to the United States to study at Presbyterian Junior College (now St. Andrews Presbyterian College), in Maxton, North Carolina, from which he received an A.A. in 1959. The next year he returned to Santiago, where he studied law at the University of Oriente and married his high school sweetheart, Irma Santos Espronceda. The couple had three children. Still hostile to Batista, he supported Fidel Castro when Castro took over the Cuban government in 1959, but he soon became critical of the new leader and spoke publicly against him. Mas Canosa was briefly jailed again, and he and his wife emigrated to the United States in 1960. He arrived penniless and worked for a time at menial jobs, including stevedore, dishwasher, milkman, and shoe salesman, in Little Havana, in Miami. In 1961 he signed up with other Cuban exiles being trained by the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) for the Bay of Pigs invasion that took place in April of that year. He didn't participate in the fighting, but he continued working for the CIA, broadcasting to Cuba through Radio Swan, an anti-Castro station sponsored by the agency. He later joined the U.S. Army, attaining the rank of second lieutenant....

Article

Mitchel, John Purroy (19 July 1879–06 July 1918), reformer and mayor of New York City, was born at Fordham (now Bronx), New York, the son of James Mitchel, a New York City fire marshal, and Mary Purroy, a schoolteacher until her marriage. After graduating from Columbia College (1899) and New York Law School (with honors in 1902), Mitchel practiced law as a private attorney. In 1909 he married Alice Olivia Child; they had no children....

Article

Morton, Julius Sterling (22 April 1832–27 April 1902), Democratic party leader, U.S. secretary of agriculture, and promoter of Arbor Day, was born in Adams, Jefferson County, New York, the son of Julius Morton, who ran a small general store, and Emeline Sterling. In 1834 his family moved to Michigan, where his father prospered as a merchant and banker. Morton attended the University of Michigan but, shortly before graduation in 1854, was expelled, apparently over a dispute with the university president over Morton’s defense of a dismissed faculty member. The faculty granted his A.B. in 1858; he also received an A.B., apparently honorary, from Union College in 1856. In 1854 he married Caroline Joy French. They had four children....

Article

Ritchie, Thomas (05 November 1778–03 July 1854), newspaper editor and Democratic party activist, was born in Tappahannock, Virginia, the son of Archibald Ritchie, a prominent immigrant Scots merchant, and Mary Roane, a member of one of Virginia’s leading legal and political dynasties. After a number of false starts in law and medicine, Ritchie became a schoolteacher and then a bookseller in Richmond. In 1807 he married the daughter of a doctor, Isabella Foushee, with whom he had seven daughters and five sons. Encouraged and supported by his Roane relations he agreed, as an avowed promoter of the Jeffersonian administration, to buy and edit a Richmond newspaper, the ...