1-20 of 45 results  for:

  • Social welfare and reform x
  • slavery abolition x
  • Sex: Female x
Clear all

Article

Chace, Elizabeth Buffum (09 December 1806–12 December 1899), antislavery activist and reformer, was born in Providence, Rhode Island, the daughter of Arnold Buffum, the first president of the New England Anti-Slavery Society, and Rebecca Gould. Elizabeth Buffum’s Quaker ancestry stretched back for many generations. Married in 1828 to a Quaker textile manufacturer, Samuel Buffington Chace of Fall River, Massachusetts, she gave birth to ten children during the years 1830 to 1852. The oldest five children died of scarlet fever and other diseases before the younger five were born....

Article

Chapman, Maria Weston (26 July 1806–12 July 1885), abolitionist and reformer, was born in Weymouth, Massachusetts, the daughter of Warren Weston and Anne Bates. Maria Weston was educated in England, where she lived with the family of her uncle Joshua Bates. She returned to the United States in 1828 to become the principal of the newly founded ...

Image

Lydia Maria Child. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-27708).

Article

Child, Lydia Maria Francis (11 February 1802–20 October 1880), author and abolitionist, was born in Medford, Massachusetts, the daughter of David Convers Francis, a baker, and Susannah Rand. Although her father’s business success allowed her older brother and intellectual mentor, Convers, to be educated at Harvard College and Harvard Divinity School, Lydia (who went by her middle name) received her education in a dame school and a local seminary. After the death of her mother in 1814, she was sent to live with her sister, Mary Francis Preston, in Norridgewock, Maine Territory. She remained with her sister until 1820 and during this period studied at a local academy preparing to become a teacher. Convers, continuing to oversee his younger sister’s intellectual development, introduced her to the works of Homer, Ben Johnson, John Milton, and Sir Walter Scott....

Article

Colman, Lucy Newhall (26 July 1817–18 January 1906), abolitionist, women's rights advocate, and freethinker, abolitionist, women’s rights advocate, and freethinker, was born in Sturbridge, Massachusetts, the daughter of Erastus Danforth, a blacksmith, and Hannah Newhall. Her mother died in 1824, and Lucy’s aunt, Lois Newhall, acted “in the place of a mother” and in 1833 married Erastus Danforth, officially becoming Lucy’s stepmother....

Article

Cowles, Betsey Mix (09 February 1810–25 July 1876), educator and reformer, was born in Bristol, Connecticut, the daughter of Giles Hooker Cowles, a Congregationalist minister, and Sally White. To support their family of eight children, Cowles’s parents moved the family to the fledgling town of Austinburg in Ohio’s western reserve shortly after her birth. Two more children came along later. Cowles’s early education took place in subscription schools. Before the spread of state-funded public schools, parents who wished to educate their children had to make arrangements with traveling schoolmasters. Cowles herself joined the ranks of such teachers at age sixteen and taught in many communities throughout northeastern Ohio and western New York....

Article

Craft, Ellen (1826?–1891), abolitionist and educator, was born on a plantation in Clinton, Georgia, the daughter of Major James Smith, a wealthy cotton planter, and Maria, his slave. At the age of eleven Ellen was given by her mistress (whose “incessant cruelty” Craft was later to recall) as a wedding present to Ellen’s half sister Eliza on the young woman’s marriage to Robert Collins of Macon, Georgia. Ellen became a skilled seamstress and ladies’ maid, esteemed for her grace, intelligence, and sweetness of temper. In Macon she met another slave two years her senior, ...

Article

Crandall, Prudence (03 September 1803–28 January 1890), abolitionist and teacher, was born in Hopkinton, Rhode Island, the daughter of Pardon Crandall, a Quaker farmer, and Esther Carpenter. When Crandall was ten her family moved to another farm in Canterbury, Connecticut. As a young woman she spent a few years (1825–1826, 1827–1830) at the New England Friends’ Boarding School in Providence and also taught school for a time in Plainfield, Connecticut....

Image

Paulina Kellogg Wright Davis. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-37939).

Article

Davis, Paulina Kellogg Wright (07 August 1813–24 August 1876), abolitionist, suffragist, and educator, was born in Bloomfield, New York, the daughter of Captain Ebenezer Kellogg and Polly Saxton. In 1817 the family moved to an undeveloped area near Niagara Falls. Davis’s enjoyment of the frontier’s exhilirating freedom ended with the deaths of her parents. In 1820 she went to live with a strict orthodox Presbyterian aunt in LeRoy, New York, where she was educated and attended church regularly....

Article

Douglass, Sarah Mapps (09 September 1806–08 September 1882), abolitionist and educator, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the daughter of Robert Douglass, Sr., a prosperous hairdresser from the island of St. Kitts, and Grace Bustill, a milliner. Her mother was the daughter of Cyrus Bustill, a prominent member of Philadelphia’s African-American community. Raised as a Quaker by her mother, Douglass was alienated by the blatant racial prejudice of many white Quakers. Although she adopted Quaker dress and enjoyed the friendship of Quaker antislavery advocates like ...

Article

Jane H. Pease and William H. Pease

Foster, Abby Kelley (15 January 1811–14 January 1887), abolitionist and feminist, was born Abigail Kelley in Pelham, Massachusetts, the daughter of Wing Kelley, a farmer and sawmill operator, and Diana Daniels. Her family moved to the Worcester area in 1811, and there Abby attended the common schools. In 1826 she finished her education at the Friends boarding school in Providence, Rhode Island. For five or six years thereafter she lived at home and taught in local schools....

Image

Frances Gage Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-92766).

Article

Gage, Frances Dana Barker (12 October 1808–10 November 1884), reformer, lecturer, and author, was born on a farm in Union Township, Washington County, Ohio, the daughter of Joseph Barker and Elizabeth Dana, farmers. The rugged conditions of farm life bred in her a hardiness and resourcefulness that served her well as an adult....

Article

Gibbons, Abigail Hopper (07 December 1801–16 January 1893), prison reformer and abolitionist, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the daughter of Isaac Tatem Hopper and Sarah Tatum, Quakers. Her father earned a moderate living as a tailor and later as a bookseller but devoted most of his time to aiding runaway slaves and free blacks. Her mother was a minister in the Society of Friends. Two years after her mother’s death in 1822, her father remarried, and in 1829 he moved with most of his family to New York City. Abigail joined them in 1830 and helped support the family by teaching at a Quaker school....

Article

Grew, Mary (01 September 1813–10 October 1896), abolitionist and women's rights advocate, abolitionist and women’s rights advocate, was born in Hartford, Connecticut, the daughter of Kate Merrow and the Reverend Henry Grew. Grew’s father, an English-born Baptist minister, was well off, and Mary was always materially comfortable. She attended the Hartford Female Seminary, established and directed by ...

Article

Griffing, Josephine Sophia White (18 December 1814–18 February 1872), abolitionist, women's rights activist, and freedmen's aid reformer, abolitionist, women’s rights activist, and freedmen’s aid reformer, was born in Hebron, Connecticut, the daughter of Joseph White and Sophia Waldo, farmers. Both parents were from prominent New England families. Though not much is known of Josephine’s childhood and education, she embarked on a life of public activism after her marriage in 1835 to Charles Stockman Spooner Griffing....

Article

Griffith Browne, Mattie (01 January 1825?–25 May 1906), antislavery writer and women's suffrage activist, was born in Owensboro, Kentucky, the daughter of Thomas and Catherine Griffith. Her father was a tavern-keeper and farmer. Various estimates have been made of her correct birth year, but no exact date has been established. Mattie and her older sister, Catherine, were orphaned in childhood, losing first their mother and then their father in 1830....

Image

Angelina Emily Grimké. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ61-1609).

Article

Grimké, Angelina Emily (20 February 1805–26 October 1879), abolitionist and women's rights activist, abolitionist and women’s rights activist, was born in Charleston, South Carolina, the daughter of John Faucheraud Grimké, a planter and judge, and Mary Smith. A member of one of the wealthiest and most aristocratic families in Charleston, her father, who had been a captain in the American Revolution, traced his descent from the city’s earliest Huguenot and German settlers and held the post of senior associate, equivalent to chief justice, of the South Carolina Supreme Court. Her mother’s family had included two colonial governors. From an early age both Angelina and her older sister ...