1-20 of 33 results  for:

  • publishing and the book trade x
  • Sex: Female x
Clear all

Article

Adams, Harriet Stratemeyer (11 December 1892–27 March 1982), author and partner in the Stratemeyer Syndicate, was born in Newark, New Jersey, the daughter of Edward Stratemeyer, an author and the founder of the Stratemeyer Literary Syndicate, and Magdalene Van Camp. Much of Adams’s life was influenced by her famous father. Circa 1905 he established the Stratemeyer Literary Syndicate, whereby he developed new juvenile series, hired writers to flesh out plot outlines he created, then successfully marketed the manuscripts to publishers. Exposure to her father’s career sparked an early interest in writing. Years later Adams recalled watching her father and one of his chief ghostwriters, ...

Article

Bailey, Lydia R. (01 February 1779–21 February 1869), printer, was born in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, the daughter of Captain William Steele and Elizabeth Bailey. The Steele family was landed gentry, and William Steele, his father, and his brothers served with distinction in the American Revolution. The brothers Steele established a paper mill in Lancaster County after the war, and William also was a prothonotary and a shopkeeper. Elizabeth Bailey was a sister of the printers ...

Article

Beach, Sylvia Woodbridge (14 March 1887–06 October 1962), bookstore owner and publisher, was born in Baltimore, Maryland, the second of three daughters of Sylvester Woodbridge Beach, a Presbyterian minister, and Eleanor Orbison, an artist. Disinclined toward both religion and formal education, she often pleaded illness and eventually fled the Presbyterian parsonage of Princeton, New Jersey, for Europe. Beach spent 1907–1908 and 1911–1912 in Florence, 1914–1916 in Spain, and in midsummer of 1916 settled in Paris, where her father had served as associate pastor at the American Church from 1902 to 1905. Paris would remain her home until her death there forty-six years later....

Article

Bryant, Louise Frances Stevens (19 September 1885–29 August 1959), social statistician and medical editor, was born in Paris, France, the daughter of Charles E. Stevens, a civil engineer, and Miriam Collins Nicholson. She spent her first three years touring Europe with her mother and sister while her father led government-sponsored prospecting operations in South America. In 1888 he died, leaving a sizable inheritance, and they settled in New York City. The inheritance dissipated in unfortunate investments, and in 1910 she moved with her family to Rahway, New Jersey. After attending Hunter College and the Normal College of the City of New York for a year, she matriculated in 1904 at Smith College, where she studied philosophy and zoology and received her B.A. in 1908. Later that year she married Arthur A. Bryant; they had no children....

Article

Clampitt, Amy Kathleen (15 June 1920–10 September 1994), poet and editor, was born in New Providence, Iowa, the daughter of Roy Justin Clampitt and Lutie Pauline Felt, farmers. As a child, Clampitt did not want to become a writer, but instead she wanted to become a painter. But, as a result of her grandfather’s influence, Clampitt read avidly and majored in English at Grinnell College in Iowa. She graduated in 1941. That same year Clampitt was awarded a fellowship to Columbia University, but she was disappointed by academic work and left without finishing her degree. Rather than return to Iowa, Clampitt stayed in New York City as a secretary for Oxford University Press. She subsequently served as promotion director for college textbooks until 1951....

Article

Cooper, Susan Augusta Fenimore (17 April 1813–31 December 1894), writer, was born at Heathcote Hill in Mamaroneck, Westchester County, New York, the daughter of the novelist James Fenimore Cooper and Susan Augusta DeLancey. The Cooper family members were devoted to one another, and the parents saw to it that each child received a fine education. Susan had tutors, attended private schools, spoke and read four languages, and studied American and English literature and history, as well as zoology and botany. She was also skillful in music, drawing, and dancing. She once danced in a great Parisian house to waltzes played by Chopin and Liszt while the hired musicians were eating their dinner....

Article

Crosby, Caresse (20 April 1892–24 January 1970), inventor, writer, and publisher, was born Mary Phelps Jacob in New York City, the daughter of William Jacob and Mary Phelps Jacob. William Jacob, who was independently wealthy, dabbled in business, and the family led a comfortable existence on Manhattan's Fifth Avenue....

Article

Deutsch, Babette (22 September 1895–13 November 1982), writer, editor, and translator, was born in New York City, the daughter of Michael Deutsch and Melanie Fisher. She grew up in New York, was a student at the Ethical Culture school, and attended Barnard College, graduating in 1917. She worked briefly for ...

Article

Draper, Margaret Green (fl. 1750–1807), printer and a publisher, was a . Nothing certain is known regarding her parentage or the place of her birth, although some sources suggest that she was a granddaughter of printer Bartholomew Green and the daughter of Thomas Green and Ann (maiden name unknown). What is known is that she married ...

Article

Duane, Margaret Hartman Markoe Bache (07 November 1770–28 May 1836), editor and printer, was born on St. Croix, the daughter of Francis Markoe and Elizabeth Hartman, Danish immigrant sugar planters. She lived on St. Croix on her parents’ plantation until her father’s death, probably in the late 1770s, when she moved to Philadelphia with her mother. They lived, for a time, with Margaret’s uncle, Abraham Markoe, a wealthy Philadelphia merchant who had constructed a large mansion in the heart of the city....

Article

Franklin, Ann Smith (02 October 1696–19 April 1763), printer and editor, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the daughter of Samuel Smith and Anna (or Ann; maiden name unknown). She grew up in Boston.

In light of her later successful career, it is reasonable to conclude that she was at least as well educated as most girls of her era. In 1723 she married ...

Article

Goddard, Mary Katherine (16 June 1738–12 August 1816), printer, newspaper publisher, and postmaster, was born in Groton, Connecticut, the daughter of Giles Goddard, a physician, and Sarah Updike Goddard, a printer. Growing up in New London, Connecticut, Goddard received an exceptional education for a woman in the 1700s, most of it from her mother, who had been taught by a French tutor. Little else is known about her early life....

Article

Goddard, Sarah Updike (1700–05 January 1770), printer and newspaper publisher, was born at Cocumscussuc, near the village of Wickford on Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, the daughter of Lodowick Updike and Abigail Newton, prominent landowners. Her paternal grandfather, Gysbert op Dyck, had emigrated from Germany to Long Island, New York, where he had purchased what later became Coney Island. Her father moved from New Amsterdam to Rhode Island and anglicized his name to Updike....

Article

Green, Anne Catharine (?–23 March 1775), colonial printer, was born probably in Holland. Nothing is known of her family or of her life until her marriage on 25 April 1738 to Jonas Green, a journeyman printer, in Christ Church, Philadelphia. In 1738 Jonas received a position in Annapolis with the expectation of becoming the printer to the province of Maryland, and Anne Catharine accompanied him to the provincial capital to begin what would be a 101-year printing dynasty in Maryland....

Article

Johnson, Eunice W. (4 Apr. 1916–3 Jan. 2010), fashion show producer and director, publishing company executive, and philanthropist, was born Eunice Walker, one of five children to Nathaniel Walker and Ethel McAlpine Walker in Selma, Alabama. Her father was a prominent physician in Selma, while her mother was a high school principal, who additionally taught art and education courses at Selma University, a private historically African American Bible college. Her maternal grandfather, Rev. Dr. William H. McAlpine, was the university’s co-founder and its second president, as well as the first president of the National Baptist Convention, U.S.A., Inc. (...

Article

Kirkus, Virginia (07 December 1893–10 September 1980), editor, book reviewer, and author, was born in Meadville, Pennsylvania, the daughter of Frederick Maurice Kirkus, a clergyman, and Isabella Clark. When Kirkus was eight years old, she told her father that when she grew up, she wanted to “make books.” The world of books became part of who she was....

Image

Blanche Knopf The Knopfs: [left to right] Blanche Knopf and Alfred Knopf, 1932. Photograph by Carl Van Vechten. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-118069).

Article

Knopf, Blanche Wolf (30 July 1894–04 June 1966), publisher, was born in New York City, the daughter of Julius W. Wolf, a wealthy jeweler, and Bertha Samuels. The younger of two children and the only daughter, she was raised in a prosperous Jewish household in New York City. She was taught by French and German governesses and attended the Gardner School. In 1911, while her family was spending the summer on Long Island near the Knopf residence, she met ...

Article

Massee, May (01 May 1881–24 December 1966), editor and producer of children's books, editor and producer of children’s books, was born in Chicago, Illinois, the daughter of Charlotte Maria Bull and Francis Spink Massee. When she was five, Massee’s family moved to Milwaukee, a German colony at the time. She did well in high school and before age eighteen completed a teaching program at the Milwaukee Normal School (later named the State Teacher’s College); she had to lie about her age to receive her certificate. Between 1901 and 1902 she taught elementary school, then worked at a library in White Water, Wisconsin. In 1904 she enrolled at the Wisconsin Library School in Madison....

Article

Miller, Olive Beaupré (11 September 1883–25 March 1968), author, editor, and publisher of books for children, was born in Aurora, Illinois, the daughter of William Beaupré, a banker, and Julia Brady. Miller liked to describe herself as “born with pencil in hand.” Before she learned to write, she recorded her first stories in picture form. By the age of seven, she was filling homemade notebooks with stories. Following a comfortable and carefree childhood, she went to Smith College, where she studied French and German, sharpened her writing skills, and contributed to college publications. After her graduation in 1904, she returned home and for several years taught English at the local high school. On 2 October 1907 she married Harry Edward Miller, a successful, self-made salesman, first of textbooks, then of commodities....