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Bethune, Joanna Graham (01 February 1770–28 July 1860), founder of charitable societies, was born at Fort Niagara, Canada, the daughter of Isabella Marshall, a teacher and charitable worker, and John Graham, a surgeon for the British army. After John Graham’s death in 1773, the family returned to ...

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Hamilton, Elizabeth Schuyler (09 August 1757–09 November 1854), statesman's wife and charity worker, statesman’s wife and charity worker, was born in Albany, New York, the second daughter of Philip Schuyler, a revolutionary war general, and Catherine Van Rensselaer Schuyler. Schooled at home, her early years were typical of most young women of colonial, aristocratic families. At the age of twenty-two, she met ...

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Jacobs, Frances Wisebart (29 March 1843–03 November 1892), welfare worker and charity organizer, was born in Harrodsburg, Kentucky, the daughter of Leon Henry Wisebart, a cutter (probably a tailor) and an officer in the B’nai B’rith Jewish service organization, and Rosetta Marx. When Frances was a young child, the family moved to Cincinnati, Ohio, where German Jews had established their own press and a theological school. Raised in a traditional Jewish home, Frances received her education in the city’s public school system and went on to become a teacher at a school in Cincinnati....

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Richmond, Mary Ellen (05 August 1861–12 September 1928), charity organization leader and social work pioneer, was born in Belleville, Illinois, the second child of Henry Richmond, a carriage blacksmith, and Lavinia Harris Richmond, the daughter of a prominent Baltimore, Maryland, jeweler and real estate broker. The only one of four children to survive, Mary was orphaned at age seven owing to tuberculosis spawned by Civil War conditions in Baltimore, to which the family had returned in 1863....