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Coppin, Fanny Jackson (1837–21 January 1913), educator, civic and religious leader, and feminist, was born a slave in Washington, D.C., the daughter of Lucy Jackson. Her father’s name and the details of her early childhood are unknown. However, by the time she was age ten, her aunt Sarah Orr Clark had purchased her freedom, and Jackson went to live with relatives in New Bedford, Massachusetts. By 1851 she and her relatives had moved to Newport, Rhode Island, where Jackson was employed as a domestic by ...

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Morgan, Mary Kimball (08 December 1861–13 October 1948), Christian Science educator and college president, was born in Janesville, Wisconsin, the daughter of Freeman Aaron Kimball, a Union officer in the Civil War and later a merchant, and Helen Maria Chapin. Mary was educated in the St. Louis, Missouri, public school system and later tutored at home. Poor health prevented her from attending college. In 1885 she married William Edgar Morgan; they had two children....

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Thurston, Matilda Smyrell Calder (16 May 1875–18 April 1958), founder and first president of Ginling College for Women, was born in Hartford, Connecticut, the daughter of George Calder, a carpenter, and Margery Patterson. Both of her parents had emigrated from Great Britain. Staunch Presbyterians, they maintained a tightly knit family. Matilda Calder left home for the first time to enter Mount Holyoke College, where she thrived on the intellectual stimulus of college life. In her senior year at Mount Holyoke, her interest in a missionary career was aroused by the visit of missionaries to the college and by her participation in a mission study class on India. She soon joined the Student Volunteer Movement for Foreign Missions (SVM). This organization, founded in 1886, encouraged college students to become missionaries....