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Coman, Katharine (23 November 1857–11 January 1915), economic historian and social reformer, was born in Newark, Ohio, the daughter of Levi Parsons Coman and Martha Seymour. An abolitionist and leader of a voluntary group serving in the Civil War, Katharine’s father held various occupations, including those of teacher, storekeeper, and lawyer. Because of poor health he moved his family to a farm near Hanover, Ohio, after the Civil War. Both of Katharine’s parents had college degrees, her father from Hamilton College and her mother from an Ohio seminary. Consequently, they sought good educations for all their children, male and female alike. As a young girl, Katharine took lessons in Latin and mathematics along with her brothers. She first attended Steubenville Female Seminary, but when the school refused to give her more challenging studies, Levi Coman moved his daughter to the high school of the University of Michigan. She later entered the university and received a bachelor of philosophy degree in 1880....

Article

Wright, Muriel Hazel (31 March 1889–27 February 1975), historian and Choctaw activist, was born in Lehigh, Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory, the daughter of Eliphalet Nott Wright, a doctor, and Ida Belle Richards, a Presbyterian missionary teacher. Wright’s one-fourth Choctaw descent was through her paternal grandfather, the Reverend Allen Wright, principal chief of the Choctaw Nation from 1866 to 1870, who proposed the name of Oklahoma for Indian Territory. Her father practiced medicine in the Choctaw Nation and served as company physician for the Missouri-Pacific Coal Mines. Throughout Wright’s youth, her father held several influential positions as a Choctaw delegate to the U.S. government during the allotment and disposition of Indian lands and the abolition of tribal governments prior to Oklahoma statehood in 1907....