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Coppin, Fanny Jackson (1837–21 January 1913), educator, civic and religious leader, and feminist, was born a slave in Washington, D.C., the daughter of Lucy Jackson. Her father’s name and the details of her early childhood are unknown. However, by the time she was age ten, her aunt Sarah Orr Clark had purchased her freedom, and Jackson went to live with relatives in New Bedford, Massachusetts. By 1851 she and her relatives had moved to Newport, Rhode Island, where Jackson was employed as a domestic by ...

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Meyer, Lucy Jane Rider (09 September 1849–16 March 1922), educator and Methodist deaconess, was born in New Haven, Vermont, the daughter of Richard Dunning Rider and his second wife, Jane Child, farmers. After a happy childhood in a loving and supportive family, she obtained her secondary education by alternately teaching and attending school. At the age of sixteen she held a teaching position in a high school in Brandon, Vermont. She spent another year with a French family in Canada and one teaching in a Quaker school for freedmen in Greensboro, North Carolina. Entering Oberlin College in September 1870 at age twenty-one, she was granted junior standing in recognition of her experience and knowledge. She graduated with an A.B. degree in 1872. While at Oberlin she met and became engaged to a young man who had dedicated himself to service as a medical missionary. In support of him and his vocation, after graduation she entered the Woman’s Medical School of Philadelphia to become a doctor. During the winter of her second year, however, her fiancé died, and she left school, returning home to recover from the shock and to be with aging parents who needed her care....

Article

Newman, Angelia French (04 December 1837–15 April 1910), church worker, reformer, and lecturer, was born Angelia Louise French Thurston in Montpelier, Vermont, the daughter of Daniel Sylvester Thurston, a farmer and tanner, and Matilda Benjamin. When “Angie,” as she was commonly known, was about age seven, her mother died. Her father remarried shortly thereafter. Angie attended the local academy and later briefly taught school until around 1852, when her family moved to Wisconsin. In 1856, soon after her eighteenth birthday, she married Frank Kilgore, the son of a Methodist minister from Madison. The marriage was childless, and he died within a year. She subsequently worked as a teacher at Central Public School in Madison and spent one term (1857–1858) at Lawrence University in Appleton. In 1859 she married David Newman, a dry goods merchant; they would have two children....