1-4 of 4 results  for:

  • Education and scholarship x
  • psychologist x
  • Sex: Female x
Clear all

Article

Calkins, Mary Whiton (30 March 1863–26 February 1930), psychologist and philosopher, was born in Hartford, Connecticut, the daughter of Wolcott Calkins, a Protestant clergyman, and Charlotte Whiton, a social activist. The close-knit family included two daughters and three sons, and Mary remained devoted to her family and its Christian values her entire life....

Article

Irwin, Elisabeth Antoinette (29 August 1880–16 October 1942), educator and psychologist, was born in Brooklyn, New York, the daughter of William Henry Irwin and Josephina Augusta Easton. Her father, a cotton merchant, provided a comfortable living, sending Irwin to Packer Collegiate Institute in Brooklyn and to Smith College (A.B., 1903). As with many Smith students of the day, Irwin became interested in the settlement house movement and in a career in social work. During the summer after graduation, she took classes at the New York School of Philanthropy (later the New York School of Social Work). That fall she began work supervising a playground (1903–1904) and then became a resident at the College Settlement on New York’s Lower East Side. She also worked for a time as a freelance journalist....

Article

Ladd-Franklin, Christine (01 December 1847–05 March 1930), psychologist and logician, was born in Windsor, Connecticut, the daughter of Eliphalet Ladd, a farmer and merchant, and Augusta Niles. Soon after the death of her mother, when Ladd-Franklin was twelve, she went to live with her paternal grandmother in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. She graduated from Welshing Academy, a coeducational institution in Wilbraham, Massachusetts, in 1865 as valedictorian of her class. When, because of financial reverses, her father could not afford to send her to Vassar College, a maternal aunt provided the necessary funds. At Vassar she studied astronomy with ...

Article

Pruette, Lorine Livingston (3 Nov. 1896–20 Dec. 1976), psychologist, social scientist, and feminist, was born in Millersburg, Tennessee to Eulalia Miller Pruette, a former schoolteacher, and Oscar Davis Pruette, a gentleman farmer. Raised a daughter of the South, Pruette spent her first five years in a small cottage on one hundred acres where her father raised pigs, hens, cattle, and horses. This first home was isolated and rural, and her parents’ marriage was contentious. Pruette later recalled her childhood as lonely and described herself as “the odd ball” (Trigg, p. 37)....