1-20 of 26 results  for:

  • Education and scholarship x
  • Sex: Female x
Clear all

Article

Barr, Amelia Edith Huddleston (29 March 1831–10 March 1919), author and teacher, was born in Ulverston, Lancashire, England, the daughter of the Reverend William Henry Huddleston and Mary Singleton. When Barr was young, her family moved often, according to her father’s assignment as a Methodist minister. Although her early education was frequently interrupted by relocations, returns on the Reverend Huddleston’s investments allowed Barr to attend the best private schools wherever the church sent the family. Furthermore, reading sophisticated books and treatises to her father reinforced her formal schooling and contributed to an excellent early education. This childhood security ended abruptly in 1847, when a family friend absconded to Australia with the Reverend Huddleston’s fortune, and Barr had to earn her own living as a “second teacher” at a school in Downham Market. Soon the family’s monetary situation improved and enabled Barr, in 1849, to attend Normal School in Glasgow to learn the Stowe teaching method, with its emphasis on moral training, lifelong learning, and understanding rather than rote learning. Marriage, in 1850, to Robert Barr, a prosperous young Scottish wool merchant, ended her teacher-training program. Nevertheless, teaching, on a formal or informal basis, was an important part of Barr’s life for the next twenty years....

Article

Bates, Katharine Lee (12 August 1859–28 March 1929), educator and writer, was born in Falmouth, Massachusetts, the daughter of William Bates, a Congregational minister, and Cornelia Frances Lee, a former schoolteacher. When Bates was less than a month old, her father died, leaving the family in straitened circumstances. They remained in Falmouth for a dozen years, then moved to Wellesley, Massachusetts, which would be Bates’s home and professional base for the rest of her life. Although the family was unusually education-minded—Bates’s paternal grandfather had been president of Middlebury College, and her mother had graduated from Mount Holyoke Seminary (later Mount Holyoke College)—poverty prevented her older brothers from continuing their schooling. Because they contributed to the family’s income, however, Bates was able to complete high school and to enroll in the newly established Wellesley College, from which she received her B.A. in 1880....

Article

Caulkins, Frances Manwaring (26 April 1795–03 February 1869), author, was born in New London, Connecticut, the daughter of Joshua Caulkins, a seagoing trader who died in Haiti before her birth, and Fanny Manwaring. Her mother married Philemon Haven in 1807. Caulkins attended schools in Norwichtown and Norwich, Connecticut. She was a voracious reader and began early in life to collect information about history and genealogies. She lived with a maternal uncle in New London, where she began to publish essays in local newspapers about people and events of regional interest....

Article

Clifton, Lucille (27 June 1936–13 February 2010), (27 June 1936–13 Feb. 2010), poet, author of children’s books, memoirist, and college professor, was born Thelma Lucille Sayles in Depew, New York. Her parents, Thelma Moore Sayles and Samuel Louis Sayles, moved north during the Great Migration, Thelma coming from Georgia and Samuel from Virginia. Strong-willed and proud of his family roots going back to Dahomey, Africa, Samuel Sayles was a steelworker and widower who had a daughter by his first wife. In 1937, a year after Lucille’s birth, he fathered a third daughter by a neighbor woman. He and Thelma Sayles, a laborer turned homemaker, then had a son in 1938. The family moved to nearby Buffalo when Lucille was a young child. Although neither parent had attended school for more than a few years, both were avid readers. Her father was a storyteller, and Thelma Sayles enjoyed writing poems. Their daughter frequently told the story of sharing one of her early free-verse poems with her mother, who responded, “Baby, that ain’t no poem!,” and proceeded to show her daughter how to write rhymed, metrical verse....

Article

Conkling, Grace Walcott Hazard (07 February 1878–15 November 1958), poet and English professor, was born in New York City, the daughter of Christopher Grant, a Presbyterian minister, and Frances Post Hazard. In 1899 Conkling graduated with a bachelor of letters degree from Smith College, where she returned to teach English in 1914. First, she taught English, Latin, and Greek at Graham School in New York for a year (1901–1902) and then traveled to Europe, where she studied music at the University of Heidelberg in 1902–1903 and languages in Paris during 1903–1904. In 1905 she married Roscoe Platt Conkling, with whom she had two children. The Conklings lived for nearly five years in Mexico. Their daughter Hilda became known as a child prodigy after her mother had two collections of her poetry published, ...

Article

Crosby, Fanny (24 March 1820–12 February 1915), poet and author of gospel hymn texts, was born Frances Jane Crosby in Putnam County, New York, the daughter of John Crosby and Mercy Crosby, farmers. (Her mother’s maiden name and married name were the same.) At the age of six weeks, she developed an eye infection, for which a man falsely claiming to be a physician prescribed the application of hot poultices; the tragic result was permanent blindness. That same year her father died, and her mother went to work as a maid. Fanny was first sent to live with her grandmother, and later with a Mrs. Hawley, who realized the child’s precociousness and set her to memorizing much of the Bible. Within two years, Fanny had committed the entire Pentateuch (complete with genealogies), most of the poetic books, and the four Gospels to memory....

Article

Deutsch, Babette (22 September 1895–13 November 1982), writer, editor, and translator, was born in New York City, the daughter of Michael Deutsch and Melanie Fisher. She grew up in New York, was a student at the Ethical Culture school, and attended Barnard College, graduating in 1917. She worked briefly for ...

Article

Ellet, Elizabeth F. (Oct. 1812 or 1818–03 June 1877), historian and poet, was born Elizabeth Fries Lummis in Sodus Point, New York, the daughter of Dr. William Nixon Lummis, an early and wealthy settler of Lake Ontario’s shores, and Sarah Maxwell. Elizabeth was educated at Aurora Female Seminary under the direction of an English Quaker, Susanna Marriott. She became fluent in French, German, and Italian. Her first book was a translation of Silvio Pellico’s tragedy ...

Image

Jessie Redmon Fauset. Oil on canvas, 1945, by Laura Wheeler Waring. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of the Harmon Foundation.

Article

Fauset, Jessie Redmon (27 April 1882–30 April 1961), writer, editor, and teacher, was born outside Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in Camden County, New Jersey, the daughter of Redmon Fauset, an African Methodist Episcopal minister, and Annie Seamon. Fauset was probably the first black woman at Cornell University, where she graduated Phi Beta Kappa with a degree in classical and modern languages in 1905. She taught briefly in Baltimore before accepting a job teaching French and Latin at the famed all-black M Street (later Dunbar) High School in Washington, D.C. While teaching, Fauset completed an M.A. in French at the University of Pennsylvania (1919)....

Article

Grimké, Angelina Weld (27 February 1880–10 June 1958), poet and teacher, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the daughter of Archibald Henry Grimké, an attorney and diplomat, and Sarah E. Stanley. Grimké’s parents separated when she was very young, and she, an only child, was raised by her father. Her mother’s absence undoubtedly contributed to Grimké’s reverential treatment of maternal themes in her poetry, short stories, and especially her only published play, ...

Article

Jordan, June Millicent (09 July 1936–14 June 2002), poet, essayist, professor, and activist, was born in New York City to Granville Ivanhoe Jordan and Mildred Fisher Jordan. Her Jamaican parents migrated to the United States during the interwar years, first settling in Harlem, where Jordan was born, and later moving to the Bedford-Stuyvesant section of Brooklyn. In the crucible of their immigrant striving—a rigorous itinerary of museums, planetariums, and symphonies; a precocious curriculum of ...

Article

Lowell, Amy (09 February 1874–12 May 1925), poet, critic, and lecturer, was born in Brookline, Massachusetts, the daughter of Augustus Lowell and Katherine Bigelow Lawrence. Both sides of the family were New England aristocrats, wealthy and prominent members of society. Augustus Lowell was a businessman, civic leader, and horticulturalist, Katherine Lowell an accomplished musician and linguist. Although considered as “almost disreputable,” poets were part of the Lowell family, including ...

Image

Josephine Miles Courtesy of the Library of Congress.

Article

Miles, Josephine (11 June 1911–12 May 1985), poet and educator, was born in Chicago, the daughter of Reginald Odber Miles, an insurance businessman, and Josephine Lackner Miles. Her father's work occasionally took the family to southern California, where the dry air of the nearby desert alleviated her chronic arthritis. After graduating from high school in Los Angeles, where she studied Greek and Roman classics, Miles studied at the University of California, Los Angeles (B.A., 1932), and at the University of California at Berkeley, majoring in the philosophy of language (M.A., 1934; Ph.D., 1938). Her dissertation, “Wordsworth and the Vocabulary of Emotion,” was published in 1942. Appointed to the Berkeley faculty in 1940, she rose from instructor (1940–1941) to assistant professor (1941–1947), associate professor (1947–1952), and university professor (1972–1978)....

Image

Marianne Moore Photograph by George Platt Lynes, 1935. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-101955).

Article

Elaine Oswald and Robert L. Gale

Moore, Marianne (15 November 1887–05 February 1972), poet, critic, and translator, was born Marianne Craig Moore in Kirkland, Missouri, the daughter of John Milton Moore, a construction engineer and inventor, and Mary Warner. Moore had an older brother, John Warner Moore. She never met her father; before her birth his invention of a smokeless furnace failed, and he had a nervous and mental breakdown and was hospitalized in Massachusetts. Moore’s mother became a housekeeper for John Riddle Warner, her father, an affectionate, well-read Presbyterian pastor in Kirkwood, until his death in 1894. Moore’s mother, always overly protective, moved with her children briefly to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and then to Carlisle, Pennsylvania, where Moore attended the Metzger Institute (now part of Dickinson College) through high school. In 1905 she entered Bryn Mawr College, in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania; published nine poems, including “A Jelly-Fish,” in its literary magazines ...

Article

Plummer, Mary Wright (08 March 1856–21 September 1916), library educator and poet, was born in Richmond, Indiana, the daughter of Jonathan Wright Plummer, a businessman, and Hannah Bullard. She attended the Friends Academy, a Quaker school in Richmond, until 1873 when the family moved to Chicago, where her father was employed as a druggist. Except for a year spent at Wellesley College (1881–1882), she remained in Chicago with her family until 1887. In that year she left to attend the beginning class of the first library school in the United States, the School of Library Economy, organized by ...

Article

Pool, Rosey E. (7 May 1905–29 Sep. 1971), poet, anthologist, and translator, was born Rosa Eva Pool in Amsterdam in the Netherlands, the eldest of two children of cigar dealer Louis Pool and domestic worker Jacoba Jessurun, both of Jewish descent. Pool started studying Germanic Languages at the University of Amsterdam in ...

Article

Sampter, Jessie Ethel (22 March 1883–11 November 1938), Zionist poet and educator, was born in New York City, the daughter of Rudolph Sampter, a lawyer, and Virginia Kohlberg. Her mother came from a traditional German-Jewish household, and her father, the son of East European Jewish immigrants, was an atheist affiliated with the Ethical Culture Society. Her father was a strong and supportive influence, reading and encouraging Sampter’s early writing....