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Christian, Barbara (12 December 1943–25 July 2000), pioneering scholar in black feminist literary criticism, was born Barbara Theresa Christian in St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, one of six children of Ruth Christian and Judge Alphonso A. Christian. A precocious scholar from a young age, Christian graduated as high school valedictorian from Saints Peter and Paul Catholic School in St. Thomas at the age of fifteen. She matriculated to Marquette University, a Jesuit Catholic university located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where she earned a B.A. cum laude in 1963. She planned to become a medical doctor and declared a major in chemistry but changed course during her sophomore year when she discovered T. S. Eliot’s poem “The Wasteland.” Christian pursued her doctorate at Columbia University in New York City, in part because of its close proximity to Harlem. She studied contemporary British and American literature, obtaining an M.A. in 1964 and a Ph.D. with distinction in 1970. Her dissertation, “Spirit Bloom in Harlem. The Search for a Black Aesthetic during the Harlem Renaissance: The Poetry of Claude McKay, Countee Cullen, and Jean Toomer,” foreshadowed Christian’s lifelong commitment to illuminating and promoting the rich African American literary canon....

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Dykes, Eva Beatrice (13 August 1893–29 October 1986), scholar and educator, was born in Washington, D.C., the daughter of James Stanley Dykes and Martha Ann Howard. Eva Dykes graduated from M. Street High (later Paul Laurence Dunbar High School) in 1910. As valedictorian of her class, she won from Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority a $10 scholarship to attend Howard University, where she graduated summa cum laude with a B.A. in English in 1914. After a year of teaching Latin and English at the now defunct Walden University in Nashville, Tennessee, and for another year elsewhere, she was urged by James Howard, a physician and uncle on her mother’s side, to enter Radcliffe College in 1916. Subsequently, she earned a second B.A. in English, magna cum laude, in 1917. Elected Phi Beta Kappa, she received an M.A. in English in 1918 and a Ph.D. in English philology in 1921. Her dissertation was titled “Pope and His Influence in America from 1715 to 1850.”...

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Folger, Emily Jordan (15 May 1858–21 February 1936), student and collector of Shakespeareana, was born in Ironton, Ohio, the daughter of Augusta Woodbury Ricker and Edward Jordan, a newspaper editor, lawyer, and solicitor of the U.S. Treasury under Presidents Abraham Lincoln and Andrew Johnson...

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Guiney, Louise Imogen (07 January 1861–02 November 1920), poet and scholar, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the daughter of Patrick Robert Guiney, a lawyer and Union brigadier general in the Civil War, and Janet M. Doyle. She studied at the Jesuit Elmhurst Convent of the Sacred Heart in Providence, Rhode Island. In 1877, two years before she graduated, her father died from an old war wound; the martial and chivalric strains in her poetry have been attributed to his influence....

Article

Preston, Harriet Waters (06 August 1836–14 May 1911), writer and translator, was born in Danvers, Massachusetts, the daughter of Samuel Preston and Lydia Proctor. She was educated by private tutors at home and then lived abroad, mainly in Italy, France, and England. She returned to the United States in 1865, lived in New England, and turned her fluency in Latin, French, and Italian to good use as a translator. Throughout the 1870s and 1880s she frequently contributed critical articles and reviews to scholarly magazines such as the ...