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Hovey, Henrietta (06 April 1849–16 March 1918), Delsartean teacher, was born Henriette Knapp in Cooperstown, New York, the daughter of Edgar Knapp and Catharine Tyler. Hovey’s lifelong interest in clothing reform is traced to an early experience when a doctor, to combat her frailty and ill-health, prescribed loose-fitting garb that would allow easy breathing and free motion. By her early twenties, Hovey was designing her own unique uncorseted costumes—subtly colored flowing gowns that became her hallmark—and lecturing on the aesthetic and health aspects of dress. To improve her speech for such presentations, she entered the Boston School of Oratory in the early 1870s where she was introduced to the system of expression developed by François Delsarte (1811–1871), a French theorist and teacher of acting, voice, and aesthetics. Delsarte’s theory was an elaborate derivation of his personal interpretation of the Christian Trinity and featured particular attention to the relationship between body, mind, and spirit in the practical work of expression in any of the arts. Hovey’s interests expanded to include physical culture and expression, and she traveled to Paris where she met Delsarte’s widow and studied with his son Gustave before the latter’s death in February 1879. In the late 1860s or 1870s she married Edward B. Crane; their son was born on 21 April, probably in 1878—possibly in 1867....

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Wade, Margaret (30 December 1912–16 February 1995), basketball coach and physical education teacher, was born Lily Margaret Wade, in McCool, Mississippi, the eighth and last child of Robert Miller Wade and Bettie Veal Wade, farmers. Margaret grew up at a time when high school women’s basketball was extremely popular in small towns and rural communities throughout the country. Her parents farmed land near Cleveland, Mississippi, and she played forward for the Lady Wildcats of Cleveland High School. After graduating in 1929 she enrolled at the recently opened Delta State Teachers College in Cleveland, where she studied physical education. Delta State started a women’s basketball team her freshman year, and Wade played the first three seasons. The team, however, proved short-lived. A national group of college-based female physical educators had launched a campaign against women’s competitive sports, arguing that women were better served by “moderate” exercise and noncompetitive play. After the 1932 season Delta State administrators succumbed to those arguments and ruled that basketball was “too strenuous for young ladies.” Wade and her teammates were furious. “We cried and burned our uniforms,” she later recalled, “but there was nothing else we could do.”...

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Wightman, Hazel Hotchkiss (20 December 1886–05 December 1974), tennis player, teacher, and patron, was born Hazel Virginia Hotchkiss in Healdsburg, California, the daughter of William Joseph Hotchkiss, a ranch owner and cannery founder, and Emma Lucretia Grove. In poor health as a child, Hazel became robust and athletic playing baseball, cricket, and field sports with her older brothers Miller, Homer, and Marius, and her friends. In 1900 her father moved his office to San Francisco, California, and the family’s residence to Berkeley, California, where his children played lawn tennis. Two years later her brothers took Hazel to watch the Pacific States (later Pacific Coast) championships in San Rafael, California. She thought a Sutton sisters baseline duel monotonous but, on a subsequent trip, thrilled to the spectacular volleying, smashing, and net attack of the brothers Samuel and Sumner Hardy, former Pacific champions. The youngsters played on the asphalt court at the University of California at Berkeley during early mornings; they later played on their home makeshift court, where erratic bounces on gravel forced them to volley constantly to sustain rallies. Hotchkiss also practiced solo against a barn wall. Self-taught, she quickly mastered grips, strokes, footwork, and proper balance, and her forte as a net and overhead attacker was established early....