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Abbot, Henry Larcom (13 August 1831–01 October 1927), Union soldier and engineer, was born in Beverly, Massachusetts, the son of Joseph Hale Abbot and Fanny Ellingwood. Abbot’s father, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, was an educator and school principal. From 1850 to 1854 Abbot attended the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, graduating second in his class. As a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army Corps of Topographical Engineers, Abbot served first in the Office of Pacific Railroad Explorations and Surveys in Washington, D.C., and then in 1855 in California and Oregon surveying a railroad route....

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Babcock, Orville Elias (25 December 1835–02 June 1884), soldier, engineer, and presidential secretary, was born in Franklin, Vermont, the son of Elias Babcock, Jr., and Clara Olmstead. Graduating third in his class from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in 1861, he was commissioned a second lieutenant of engineers. During the first year of the Civil War he gained promotion to first lieutenant, serving successively in the Department of Pennsylvania and the Department of the Shenandoah. He was then transferred to the Army of the Potomac, where he served on the staff of ...

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Bailey, Joseph (06 May 1825–26 March 1867), military engineer, was born probably in Pennsville, Ohio, and moved to Illinois as a child. His parents’ names and occupations are unknown. He studied civil engineering and in 1846 married Mary Spaulding. They had one daughter. In 1847 he relocated to Kilbourn City, Wisconsin, where he became a successful lumberman and engineer....

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John G. Barnard. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-B8172-1641).

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Barnard, John Gross (19 May 1815–14 May 1882), soldier, engineer, and scientist, was born in Sheffield, Massachusetts, the son of Robert Foster Barnard and Augusta Roberta Porter. He was the younger brother of the distinguished educator Frederick Augustus Barnard, president and chancellor of the University of Mississippi and president of Columbia College (now Columbia University) in New York City. Barnard graduated second in his 1833 class of the U.S. Military Academy and was commissioned in the Corps of Engineers. He married Jane Elizabeth Brand, who died in 1853. He married Anna E. Hall Boyd in 1860....

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Foster, John Gray (27 May 1823–02 September 1874), soldier and engineer, was born in Whitefield Coos County, New Hampshire, the son of Perley Foster and Mary Gray. When Foster was very young, his family moved to Nashua, New Hampshire, where his father was major of the Nashua Light Artillery. Foster graduated fourth in his West Point class of 1846 and was commissioned in the Corps of Engineers. In 1851 he married Mary Moale (or Mole), with whom he had one child. After Mary’s death in 1871, he married Anna Johnson in 1872; the number of their children, if any, is unknown....

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William B. Franklin Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-B8172-3795).

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Franklin, William Buel (27 February 1823–08 March 1903), soldier and engineer, was born in York, Pennsylvania, the son of Walter S. Franklin, a clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives, and Sarah Buel. As a young man Franklin showed great promise as an engineer and a soldier. He gained admission to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point at the age of sixteen and graduated four years later first in the class of 1843, whose members included ...

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Gaillard, David Du Bose (04 September 1859–05 December 1913), soldier and engineer, was born in Fulton, Sumter County, South Carolina, the son of Samuel Isaac Gaillard (pronounced Ge- yard), a planter, and Susan Richardson Du Bose. He received an appointment to the U.S. Military Academy in 1880. His high standing in the graduating class of 1884 entitled him to a commission in the Corps of Engineers as a second lieutenant and admission to the army’s Engineer School of Application, Willets Point, New York. He completed the course in 1887 and was promoted to first lieutenant. That year he married Katherine Ross Davis; they had one child....

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Herman Hattaway and Eric B. Fair

Gillmore, Quincy Adams (28 February 1825–07 April 1888), soldier and engineer, was born in Black River, Lorain County, Ohio, the son of Quartus Gillmore and Elizabeth Reid, farmers. Gillmore attended a local high school, then taught for three years before his twentieth birthday. His scholarship, especially in mathematics, won him an appointment to the U.S. Military Academy in July 1845. Gillmore graduated first of forty-three cadets in the class of 1849. At this time he married Mary Isabella O’Maher. The couple would raise four sons....

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George Washington Goethals Photograph by Arnold Genthe, 1913. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-G432-0358-A).

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Goethals, George Washington (29 June 1858–21 January 1928), engineer and military officer, was born in Brooklyn, New York, the son of John Louis Goethals, a carpenter, and Marie Le Barron. At the age of fourteen he entered the College of the City of New York. In April 1876, after three years of college, Goethals won a cadetship to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. He graduated second in his class in 1880, a distinction that won for him a commission as second lieutenant in the Army Corps of Engineers....

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Graham, James Duncan (04 April 1799–28 December 1865), army officer, was born in Prince William County, Virginia, the son of William Graham, a revolutionary war veteran and physician, and Mary Campbell. Graham enrolled in the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, New York, on 19 June 1813 and graduated on 17 July 1817. While at West Point, Graham studied mathematics under former U.S. astronomer ...

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Gridley, Richard (03 January 1711–21 June 1796), artilleryman, military engineer, and entrepreneur, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the son of Captain Richard Gridley and his third wife, Rebecca, whose maiden name is uncertain. His father, a currier by trade and an active militia officer, died when young Richard was only three years old. In 1719 his widowed mother married Benjamin Landon, a Boston shopkeeper. After grammar school, Richard was apprenticed to a merchant. In 1731 he married Hannah Deming; they had nine children....

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Groves, Leslie Richard, Jr. (17 August 1896–13 July 1970), army officer and engineer, was born in Albany, New York, the son of Leslie R. Groves, Sr., a Presbyterian minister, and Gwen Griffith. When his father became an army chaplain, Groves accompanied him around various camps in the United States, Cuba, and the Philippines. In 1913 he enrolled for a year at the University of Washington and also completed two more years at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology before entering the U.S. Military Academy in 1916. Groves graduated fourth in his class in November 1918 and was commissioned a second lieutenant of engineers. He subsequently attended the Engineer School at Camp A. A. Humphreys (now Fort Belvoir, Va.) for an additional year of training before completing a three-month tour of occupation duty in France with the American Expeditionary Force immediately after World War I. By 1919 Groves was back at the Engineer School, where he completed several civil engineering courses and graduated in 1921. In 1922 he married Grace Wilson; they had two daughters....

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Andrew A. Humphreys. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-B8172-1423).

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Humphreys, Andrew Atkinson (02 November 1810–27 December 1883), Union soldier and engineer, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of Samuel Humphreys and Letitia Atkinson. Humphreys’s grandfather, Joshua Humphreys, designed the first warships for the U.S. Navy during the administration of George Washington...

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Ives, Joseph Christmas (25 December 1828–12 November 1868), soldier, engineer, and explorer, was born in New York City, the son of Ansel Wilmot Ives and Laura (maiden name unknown), occupations unknown. Little is known of his early years. Apparently, he was raised in a boardinghouse in New Haven, Connecticut. He attended Yale College and graduated fifth in his class at West Point in 1852. Commissioned as a brevet second lieutenant of ordnance, Ives served at the Watervliet, New York, arsenal (1852–1853) and was transferred to the topographical engineers in 1853. He was an assistant topographical engineer on the Pacific Railroad Survey (1853–1854) and in the Pacific Railroad Office in Washington, D.C. (1854–1857). In 1855 he married Cora Semmes, who came from a prominent southern family; they eventually had three children, all sons, two of whom would serve in the U.S. military. In 1857 Ives was promoted to first lieutenant and was named to lead an expedition up the Colorado River in order to develop potential routes of supply in the event of a war between the national government and the Mormon settlements in Deseret (Utah)....

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Jadwin, Edgar (07 August 1865–02 March 1931), soldier and engineer, was born in Honesdale, Pennsylvania, the son of Cornelius Comegys Jadwin, a druggist, and Charlotte Ellen Wood. He attended Lafayette College for two years and then in 1886 received an appointment to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, from which he graduated first in his class four years later. Jadwin was commissioned a second lieutenant in the Army Corps of Engineers and assigned as senior inspector on the project to enlarge the immigration station at Ellis Island, New York. In February 1891 he reported to the Engineer School of Application at Willet’s Point, New York, where he took the postgraduate course; he remained as quartermaster of the battalion of engineers until 1895, when he became the assistant to the district engineer in Wilmington, North Carolina, working on various river and harbor improvements. In October 1897 he became an assistant in the Fortification Section in the Office of the Chief of Engineers in Washington, D.C....

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Long, Stephen Harriman (30 December 1784–04 September 1864), army explorer and engineer, was born in Hopkinton, New Hampshire, the son of Moses Long, a farmer, tradesman, and local politician, and Lucy Harriman. In 1809 he graduated from Dartmouth College, and he spent the next five years teaching at Salisbury, New Hampshire, and Germantown, Pennsylvania. In those positions he demonstrated a high level of mathematical skill while becoming a surveyor and an inventor. Soon he came to the attention of U.S. army chief of engineers General ...