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Ayres, Anne (03 January 1816–09 February 1896), founder of the first Episcopal women's religious order, founder of the first Episcopal women’s religious order, was born in London, England, the daughter of Robert Ayres and Anne (maiden name unknown). She emigrated in 1836 with her mother to the United States and settled in New York City on the lower west side of Manhattan....

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Page, Ann Randolph Meade (03 December 1781–28 March 1838), Episcopal slavery reformer, was born at “Chatham,” the family home in Stafford County, Virginia, the daughter of Col. Richard Kidder Meade, aide-de-camp of General George Washington, and Mary Fitzhugh Grymes. She grew up on “Lucky Hit,” her parents’ plantation in Frederick (now Clarke) County, Virginia. She was raised in an educated gentry family of English descent. As an evangelical, her mother taught her children not only reading and writing but also what evangelicals cherished—the importance of self-denial, simple living and service to slaves in contrast to what the gentry sought—a fashionable living reminiscent of the English nobility with servants to indulge their needs....

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Wedel, Cynthia Clark (26 August 1908–24 August 1986), Episcopal ecumenist, was born in Dearborn, Michigan, the daughter of Arthur Pierson Clark, a civil engineer, and Elizabeth Snow Haigh. She grew up in Buffalo, New York, and Evanston, Illinois. Wedel received her bachelor’s degree in 1929 and her master’s in 1930, both from Northwestern University. From 1931 until 1934 she was director of Christian education at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Evanston. In 1934 she went to New York City, where she was a fieldworker at the national headquarters of the Episcopal church, becoming in 1935 the director of youth work. In May 1939 she married Theodore Otto Wedel, a widower and sixteen years her senior, who at the time was general secretary for Episcopal college work. In 1939 the Wedels moved to Washington, D.C., where he became the canon chancellor of the Washington Cathedral of St. Peter and St. Paul and director of studies at the College of Preachers of the cathedral, a program of continuing education for clergy. From 1943 until 1960 he was warden of the College of Preachers. Cynthia Wedel called herself “the busiest volunteer in Washington,” working for the Red Cross, the Girl Scouts, and the Public Welfare Advisory Committee of the District of Columbia. Later President ...